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L I E> KAR.Y 

OF THE 

UN IVERSITY 

Of ILLINOIS 

cop. 1* 



HISTORY 



OF 



McHENRY COUNTY 



ILLINOIS 



BY 



SPECIAL AUTHORS AND CONTRIBUTORS 




VOLUME II 



ILLUSTRATED 



CHICAGO 
MUNSELL PUBLISHING COMPANY 

PUBLISHERS 

1922 



In the first century of the Christian era, Tacitus (perhaps the 
greatest of Roman historians) wrote that the object of history was 
"to rescue virtuous acts from the oblivion to which the want of 
records would consign them." 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



CHAPTER XL 



THE PART OF BIOGRAPHY IN GENERAL HISTORY CITIZENS OF MCHENRY 

COUNTY AND OUTLINES OF PERSONAL HISTORY — PERSONAL SKETCHES 
ARRANGED IN ENCYCLOPEDIC ORDER. 

The verdict of mankind has awarded to the Muse of History the 
highest place among the Classic Nine. The extent of her office, how- 
ever, appears to be, by many minds, but imperfectly understood. The 
task of the historian is comprehensive and exacting. True history 
reaches beyond the doings of court or camp, beyond the issue of battles 
or the effects of treaties, and records the trials and the triumphs, the 
failures and the successes of the men who make history. It is but an 
imperfect conception of the philosophy of events that fails to accord 
to portraiture and biography its rightful position as a part — and no 
unimportant part — of historic narrative. Behind and beneath the ac- 
tivities of outward life the motive power lies out of sight, just as the 
furnace fires that work the piston and keep the ponderous screw revolv- 
ing down in the darkness of the hold. So, the impulsive power which 
shapes the course of communities may be found in the moulding influ- 
ences which form its citizens. 

It is no mere idle curiosity that prompts men to wish to learn the 
private, as well as the public, lives of their fellows. Rather is it true 
that such desire tends to prove universal brotherhood; and the interest 
in personality and biography is not confined to men of any particular 
caste or vocation. 

The list of those to whose lot it falls to play a conspicuous part in 
the great drama of life, is comparatively short; yet communities are 
made up of individuals, and the aggregate of achievement — no less than 
the sum total of human happiness — is made up of the deeds of those 
men and women whose primary aim, through life, is faithfully to per- 
form the duty that comes nearest to hand. Individual influences upon 

459 



460 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

human affairs will he considered potent or insignificant, according to 
the standpoint from which it is viewed. To him who, standing upon 
the seashore, notes the ebh and flow of the tides and listens to the sullen 
roar of the waves, as they break upon the beach in seething foam, seem- 
ingly chafing at their limitations, the ocean appears so vast as to need 
no tributaries. Yet, without the smallest rill thai helps to swell the 
"Father of Waters," the mighty torrent of the Mississippi would be 
lessened, and the beneficent influence of the Gulf Stream diminished. 
Countless streams, currents and counter currents — sometimes mingling, 
sometimes counteracting each other — collectively combine to give motion 
to the accumulated mass of waters. So it is — and so must it ever be — 
in the ocean of human action, which is formed by the blending and 
repulsion of currents of thought, of influence and of life, yet more 
numerous and more tortuous than those which form the "fountains 
of the deep." The acts and characters of men, like the several faces 
that compose a composite picture, are wrought together into a compact 
or heterogeneous whole. History is condensed biography; "Biography 
is History teaching by example." 

It is both interesting and instructive to rise above the generaliza- 
tion of history and trace, in the personality and careers of the men from 
whom it sprang, the principles and influences, the impulses and ambi- 
tions, the labors, struggles and triumphs that engross their lives. 

Here are recorded the careers and achievements of pioneers who, 
"when the fullness of time had come," came from widely separated 
sources, some from beyond the sea, impelled by divers motives, little 
conscious of the import of their acts, and but dimly anticipating the 
harvest which would spring from the sowing. They built their primi- 
tive homes, toiling for a present subsistence while laying the founda- 
tions of private fortunes and future advancement. 

Most of these have passed away, but not before they beheld a devel- 
opment of business and population surpassing the wildest dreams of 
fancy or expectation. A few yet remain whose years have passed the 
allotted three-score and ten, and who love to recount, among the cher- 
ished memories of their lives, their reminiscences of early days. 



[The following items of personal and family history, haying been arranged in 
encyclopedic (or alphabetical) order as to names of the individual subjects, no spec-id 
index to this part of the work will be found necessary.) 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 461 

CHARLES T. ABBOTT. 

Charles T. Abbott, proprietor of a general repair shop at Woodstock, 
is a skilled machinist, and owner of a valuable farm in Greenwood Town- 
ship. He was born in McIIenry County, September 29, 1859, one of the 
three children of his parents, George and Emeransa Abbott, natives of 
Ohio. George Abbott was a fanner and cattle dealer, and held govern- 
ment contracts for supplying cattle to the army during the Civil War. 
His death occurred in December, 1889, and his wife died in February. 
1890. 

Charles T. Abbott attended the local schools of his native county, and 
until 1902, was engaged in farming, but in that year he entered his pres- 
ent line of business. He specializes in Pennsylvania lubricating oils and 
grease, and conducts a garage and general repair business, doing an 
annual business of about .$15,000, and giving employment to four persons. 
In addition to his tine farm of 183 acres in Greenwood Township, Mr. 
Abbott owns his residence at Xo. 219 Lumber Street, and is a man of sub- 
stance in his community. 

On September 29, 1885, Mr. Abbott was married to Miss Mary Pierce, 
a daughter of John Pierce, who came from one of the eastern states to 
Mellenry County. Mr. and Mrs. Abbott have the following children : 
Lela M., who is the wife of J. D. Manor; George V., now associated with 
his father, served in the First Mechanical Regiment, Company Seven, 
was second in the Ford automobile race held in Chicago in 1916, when he 
drove a machine at an average rate of seventy-five miles an hour ; Ivan, 
who is attending the University of Illinois and taking a course in elec- 
trical engineering, and Harold A., who is attending school. Mr. Abbott 
and family belong to the Methodist Episcopal church. In politics he is a 
Republican, and fraternally he belongs to the Odd Fellows. A skilled 
man in his line, Mr. Abbott's services are in great demand bj- those desir- 
ing expert assistance, and the volume of his trade has increased with each 
vear he has been in business. 



CHARLES H. ACKMAN, JR. 

Charles H. Ackman, Jr., supervisor of Coral Township, and one of 
the leading men of McHenry County, resides at Union, where he is 
engaged in a real estate business, although he owns two farms in Coral 



LIBRARY 

UNIVERSE OF ILUtm* 



462 HISTOKY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

Township and is interested in the operation of a threshing outfit. He 
was horn in Cook County, Illinois, April 27, 1876, one of the eight chil- 
dren of his parents. His father, Charles H. Ackman, Sr., was born in 
Cook County, Illinois, but later came to McIIenry County, in 1907, and 
was one of the prosperous farmers here until his death, August 20, 1917. 
His widow survives him and lives in Kane Count}', Illinois. 

Charles H. Ackman attended the common and high schools of his 
native county, and lived on a farm until 1916, when he removed to Union, 
retaining, however, one farm of 127 acres, and another of 128% acres, 
both in Coral Township. 

On October 10, 1900, Mr. Ackman was married to Miss Emma 
Wiesche, a daughter of Christian Wiesche, one of the pioneers of Coral 
Township. Mr. and Mrs. Ackman have four children, namely: "Wayne 
C, LeRoy W., Thelma H. and Harvey H., all of whom were born in 
McHenry County. The family all belong to the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, and Mr. Ackman belongs to the Evangelical Church. He is a 
Republican, and was highway commissioner for nine years, and was 
elected supervisor in 1916. Fraternally he belongs to Oriental Lodge 
No. 358, A. F. & A. M., and Coral Lodge No. 769, I. O. O. F. 



FRANCIS J. AICHER. 



Francis J. Aicher, D. D. S., is one of the capable and skilled members 
of the dental profession, engaged in active practice at McHenry. He 
was born at Washburn, 111., February 1, 1890, one of three children born 
to his parents, Benedict and Anna (Fecht) Aicher. Benedict Aicher was 
born in Germany and came to the United States in 1861, and after stop- 
ping for a time in New York City, came on to Illinois, and went into a 
real estate and stock business at Washburn, 111. There he lived until 
death claimed him, in 1900. The mother of Francis J. Aicher, who was 
his second wife, survives him. By a former marriage, Benedict Aicher 
had four children. 

Doctor Aicher attended the common and high schools of Washburn, 
and then took a three years' course in the Dental School of the North- 
western University, from which he was graduated in 1913. Finding the 
opening he sought at McHenry, he located in this city immediately fol- 
lowing his graduation, and since then has built up a very desirable prac- 
tice, and has earned the confidence of his patients. 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 463 

Like other McHenry County men, Doctor Aicher is very patriotic, 
and when his country entered into the World War, he offered his serv- 
ices, and on September 15, 1917, was commissioned a first lieutenant in 
the Dental Reserve of the United States Army. He belongs to the 
Knights of Columbus and the Modern Woodmen of America. In politics 
he is independent in his views. The Catholic Church holds his member- 
ship. 



ALFRED 0. ALLBEE. 



Alfred 0. Allbee, one of the energetic and prosperous farmers of 
Dorr Township, was born in Seneca Township, April 16, 1872, a son of 
Oren and Christina (Lindsay) Allbee, natives of Collins Center, and 
Buffalo, N. Y., respectively, the date of her birth being November 25, 
1828. The paternal grandfather was Adolphus Allbee, and he came to 
what was then the wilderness of New York state from Vermont, with 
four or five brothers, and became pioneers of that region. 

When he was eighteen years old Oren Allbee came to Illinois to join 
his old employer Alvin King, who had come to McHenry County, and 
entered land. After a short time, Oren Allbee bought a farm in Seneca 
Township, three miles west of Woodstock, on the Marengo road, which 
he kept as his homestead, although he bought and sold several other 
farms. His death occurred at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Flanders, 
of Seneca Township, in February, 1914, when he was eighty-six years 
old. He had been retired for some years after becoming very successful 
as a farmer. His wife died in December, 1907. They were married 
November 23, 1863. She was a daughter of Thomas and Mary (Mathew- 
son) Lindsay, both of Scotch birth, who came to New York City, where 
Mrs. Allbee was born September 30, 1838. When she was still a child 
her parents came to McHenry County, locating on a farm in Don- 
Township, two miles south of Woodstock, which property is still in the 
family. They were among the pioneers of this section, and made the 
trip overland with ox teams. The father was killed by an accident in 
the timber, and he left seven children, all small, namely: Thomas, 
who had the homestead, died at Woodstock in 1902 leaving no issue; 
Arthie, who is the only survivor, lives at Wayne, Nebr. ; Jennie M., 
who married William Scott, lived on a farm near the homestead, where 
both died; Christina, who became Mrs. Allbee; Mrs. Robert Richards j 



li. I HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

who died in Dakota: Mary, who married Thomas Wier, went to Kansas 
and then to Idaho, where she died in 1 9 1 S ; and Archie, who left home 
when young. The old Lindsay homestead is owned by Mrs. Daggetl 
of Woodstock. 

Orel) Allliee was well known as an auctioneer for many years. While 
a strong Republican, he was no politician. He had three children, 
namely: Nellie, who married George Redpatli, died in young woman- 
hood; Alfred O., whose name heads this review; and Mary, who married 
Will Flanders of Seneca Township. 

Alfred 0. Allbee remained on the homestead until he was thirty years 
old, when he bought a farm in Boone County. On November 29, 1902, 
he was married to Mrs. Ina (Elliott) Gillette, a daughter of George 
Elliott. After a few years in Boone County, Mr. Allbee sold his farm 
and came back to McHenry County, buying a tract of land in Coral 
Township, on which he remained for five years. In 1917 he bought his 
present place of 107 acres in Dorr and Nunda Townships. It is well 
improved and fitted for modern dairying. He has a herd of cattle and 
carries on general farming. Like his father he is a Republican, but no 
office seeker. He and his wife have had the following children born to 
them: Hal Eldon, and Majorie Esther, both of whom are at home. 
Mr. Allbee and his wife are connected with some of the oldest and most 
influential families in McHenry County, and come of as fine American 
stock as can be found in the country, and they live up to the best stand- 
ards of citizenship in every respect. Mr. Allbee is an expert farmer, and 
his fine farm shows that the owner takes a pride in his premises and knows 
just what he is about when he directs any work. 



CHARLES W. ALBRIGHT. 

Charles W. Albright, one of the prosperous men of McHenry County, 
who is helping to maintain its prestige as a great dairying center, owns a 
valuable farm four miles east of Algonquin in Algonquin Township. He 
was born in Barrington Township, Cook County, Illinois, November 11, 
1873, about three miles east of his present farm, a son of Christ and 
Charlotte Albright, natives of Germany, who with two children came to 
the United States about 1866, and in 1S76 bought land on Crystal Lake, 
in Algonquin Township, one mile east of the farm now owned b.y Charles 
W. Albright. This farm comprised forty acres and was developed into 



HISTORY OF McHENEY COUNTY 465 

an excellent farm, on which Christ Albright lived into old age, dying at 
his home in McHenry County at the age of eighty-six years. His wife 
had died six years previously. Their three children to reach maturity 
were as follows : Ernest, who died in Dundee Township, aged forty- 
three years, was a farmer, and left a widow and six children; Mary, who 
is .Mrs. William Mitchell of North Dakota, and Charles W., whose name 
heads this review. 

Charles W. Albright remained on the homestead until he was twenty- 
six years old, when he rented a farm for a few years and then located 
on his present one, then owned by Robert Haeger, father of Supervisor 
Haeger. After renting it for two years he went on the farm of William 
Brandt for fifteen years. Finally in 1912 he bought the Haeger farm, 
which comprises 130 acres, for which he paid $110 per acre. He has re- 
built the barn, erected a silo and rebuilt the house, and has a nice place. 
Dairying is his main feature and he keeps thirty-five cows of the Holstein 
strain. The farm is well located for dairying purposes, and he has it 
drained properly. Since buying the farm he has placed ten more acres 
of it under cultivation. In 1919 he bought sixty acres adjoining the 
homestead. For three years Mr. Albright served as road commissioner, 
and has been a capable official. 

When he was twenty-six years old Mr. Albright was married to Min- 
nie Golderman, of Algonquin Township, a daughter of Fred and Louise 
Golderman, who came to McHenry County at an early date. Both are 
now deceased, but were at one time engaged in farming two and one-half 
miles east of Algonquin. Mr. and Mrs. Albright have four children, 
namely : William, Stella, Laura and Hazel, all of whom are at home. 
Mr. Albright has worked very hard to accomplish what he has and de- 
serves his present prosperity. He stands very high in his neighborhood, 
and his associates recognize that he is a man of his word, and one who 
knows how to get things done right. 



CHARLES T. ALLEN. 



Charles T. Allen, formerly assistant state's attorney of McHenry 
County, is the junior member of the law firm of Lumley & Allen, of 
Cary. He was born in Algonquin Township, McHenry County, Feb- 
ruary 27, 1882, one of the six children of Thomas C. and Margaret 
(Brannan) Allen. Thomas C. Allen was born in Ireland, but came to 



466 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

the United States with his parents when a mere infant, and spent the 
greater part of his life in Algonquin Township. For some years he 
was general superintendent of the Washington lee Company at Cary, 
but retired several years prior to his death, which occurred December 
10, 1913. 

Charles T. Allen attended the public schools of McHenry County and 
the Elgin Academy, from which he was graduated. He then studied law 
at the Northwestern Law School, being graduated therefrom in 1910, 
and was admitted to the bar. In the fall of thai year he opened an office 
at Woodstock, the county seat, and one at Cary, where he retained his 
residence. In 1915 lie formed a partnership with V. S. Lumley, a prom- 
inent attorney of the McHenry County bar. Later, upon the election of 
Mr. Lumley to the office of state's attorney. .Mr. Allen was appointed 
assistant state's attorney and proved himself a very capable official. From 
this position on .March 1. 1921, he resigned on account of the large pri- 
vate practice he had acquired and his extensive real estate interest along 
Fox River, and since then has maintained his office almost exclusively at 
Cary. .Mr. Allen has been for the last ten years and is now city attorney 
of Algonquin and Cary, both of this county. In polities he is a Republi- 
can. 

In 1903 Mr. Allen was married to .Miss Vera Mentch, and they have 
twii sons. Russell C. and Robert E. Mr. Allen is a Mason. Odd Fellow and 
Elk, and also belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America and Royal 
Neighbors. He and his family reside at Cary. 111., where he is most 
highly esteemed as a man and attorney, as well as throughout McHenry 
County, where his professional duties and his past connections with the 
state's attorney's office has given him a large acquaintance. 



HENRY PHILIPS ALLEN. 

Henry Philips Allen, now- deceased, was formerly one of the highly- 
esteemed and reliable men of Dorr Township. He was born in Madison 
County, N. Y., February 26, 1839, a son of Thomas and Mary (Williams) 
Allen. In 1840 the family came to McHenry County, settling in Dorr 
Township, adjoining the farm later owned by Henry Philips Allen, five 
miles south of Woodstock, which property is still in the family. It was 
a tract of timber land, but from it Thomas Allen developed a good home, 
and lived on it until his death, December 11, 1883, when he was aged 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 467 

eighty-nine years. His widow died July 3, 1886, aged eighty-seven 
years. They had three children, namely: James, who owned a farm 
adjoining the homestead, but retired to Woodstock, there dying, being 
survived by his widow and daughter, Mrs. George G. Miller; Henry P., 
whose name heads this review; and Frank, who inherited the homestead, 
but became a machinist, worked at Union and later at St. Charles, 111., 
and now lives in California. 

Henry P. Allen was reared on his father's farm and remained on it 
until his marriage. He studied to be a teacher, but never followed that 
calling. On January 16, 1866, he was married to Louisa Hope, a 
daughter of William and Elizabeth Hope. Mrs. Allen is the only sur- 
vivor of her father's family of four sons and two daughters, and the 
only one who continued to reside in McHenry County. She was only 
seventeen- years old at the time of her marriage. Mr. and Mrs. Allen 
began their married life in the house still occupied by Mrs. Allen, on 
fifty acres of land which were taken from his father's homestead, to 
which he added until he had 100 acres. He followed general mixed 
farming, and for a few years conducted a store at Union. Mr. Allen 
died January 1, 1911, after a major operation in a hospital. Mr. and 
Mrs. Allen became the parents of the following children: George, 
who died in boyhood; Rose, who married John Wallace of Seneca Town- 
ship; Jessie, who married Charlie Gule, of Dorr Township; Dora, who is 
at home; Kittie, who is Mrs. George Pugh, owns a part of the old Allen 
farm; Harry A., who is operating his father's homestead. Both Rose 
and Jessie Allen were school-teachers prior to their marriage and very 
successful in their chosen calling. The present house on the homestead 
has been thoroughly modernized and has electric lights, is heated by a 
furnace, and has other first-class improvements. Harry A. Allen is 
conducting this farm so as to make it one of the model ones of the 
county. Henry Philips Allen was one of the upright, honorable men 
of his community, and when he died Dorr Township suffered a loss it 
could ill afford. However he left behind him some fine children who are 
a credit to their name and to the township which gave them birth and 
fostered them. 



Y. B. ANDERSON. 
Page 150. 



His HISTORY OP McHENRY COUNTY 

LEWIS J. ASHBURN. 

Lewis J. Asliliuni, successful business man and vice-presideni of the 
Eerrick Feed Company of Harvard, is rightly cumbered among the 
representative citizens of Me Henry ( lounty. He was born in Wisconsin, 
October 19, 1889, and is one of the five children of Ole and Julia ( Larsen I 
Ashburn, prosperous farming people of Rock County, Wis. 

Growing up on his father's farm, Lewis J. Ashburn attended the dis- 
trict schools of his native county, and the Sharon High School, and after 
being graduated from the latter, he took a business course in the Southern 
Wisconsin Business College at Janesville, W T is. In 1910 Mr. Ashburn 
came to Harvard and entered the employ of Hunt, Helm, Ferris & Com- 
pany. After remaining with that concern for two years, and lieing 
employed in the First State Bank for four years, he went into business 
for himself and for a time conducted a popular grocery and meat market. 
Disposing of his business he formed his present connections which are 
congenial and profitable, and has risen to be the vice-president of his 
company. 

On June 5, 1893, Mr. Ashburn was united in marriage with Miss 
Elsie Mae Crosby, who was born February 18, 1889. Mr. and Mrs. 
Ashburn have one daughter, Dellora Mae, who was born May 8, 1919. 
An alert and astute business man Mr. Ashburn has risen through his 
own efforts, and deserves the prosperity which has attended him. 



W1LLIA1I A. AUSTIN. 



William A. Austin, now living retired at Richmond, is a justice of the 
peace and a very representative man in every particular. He was born 
August 10, 1885, a son of William H. and Angeline (Austin) Austin, 
both of whom are deceased, the latter passing away in Ohio. William II. 
Austin was colonel of the regiment raised in McHenry County for serv- 
ice during the Civil War, and after its close he went to Nebraska, where 
he died as the result of injuries received in that conflict. He and his wife 
had the following children : David, who died at the age of sixteen years, 
about the time of the birth of William A. ; Hattie B., who married Lewis 
Vogel, deputy assistant secretary of state, resides at Springfield, 111.: 
Edward, who is the owner of the old farm in Richmond Township, two 
miles south of Richmond, and William A., whose name heads this review. 



HISTORY OF McHBNRY COUNTY 469 

William A. Austin remained at home until he was sixteen years old, 
and attended the Richmond High School. At his father's death he as- 
sumed charge of one of the farms owned by the elder man, and for the 
subsequent five years was engaged in dairying and stock growing. At 
the expiration of that period, he moved to Richmond and the farm is now 
operated on shares by a tenant. This farm is a very valuable one and 
a herd is kept of about thirty-five cows of the Ilolstein strain. The 
buildings on the farm were erected by his father for dairying purposes. 
.Air. Austin is convinced of the wisdom of handling only good stock, and 
his product is excellent in this respect. While he is not now on the farm, 
he supervises the work, having learned to be a practical farmer from his 
father, who at one time was one of the most extensive agriculturalists of 
the county, owning 560 acres of land. 

William A. Austin was married September 20, 1911, to Marietta 
Johnsen, a daughter of Ole and Anna Johnsen, of Richmond Township, 
who was only eighteen years old at that time. Mr. and .Mis. Austin have 
four children, namely: Edwin, Harold, Arlen, and Donald P. A strong 
Republican, like his estimable father, Mr. Austin is now- serving as a jus- 
tice of the peace. He belongs to Richmond Lodge, A. P. & A. M. Brought 
up in the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which his parents were con- 
sistent members, Mr. Austin is himself a member of it, and contributes 
very liberally toward its support. 

Mr. Austin is a man of public spirit, and in his operations he has 
been broad enough to take advantage of the experience of others and so 
has rendered a service to his community by redeeming farm land through 
effective drainage. In his office as justice, he displays good common sense 
and excellent judgment with reference to human nature, and few of his 
decrees are reversed by a higher court. 



EDWARD E. AYER. 



Edward E. Aver, one of the most distinguished men McHenry County 
has produced, is known all over the civilized world as the greatest living 
authority on the history of the American Indian. He has not confined 
his studies to this one line, however, but is equally well informed upon a 
variety of subjects, all of his intellectual development being entirely the 
outgrowth of his own endeavors, for he is a self-made man in the best 
sense of the word. 



470 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

When he was eighteen years old, Edward E. Aver left his home in 
Harvard and went to Nevada, where he worked in a quartz-mill for a 
time, going on to San Francisco, where he was engaged in chopping wood 
and working in a saw-mill. With the outhreak of the Civil "War, he 
offered his services to his country by enlisting in the First California Cav- 
alry, and saw service in California, Arizona ami New .Mexico, being dis- 
charged with the rank of second lieutenant. He then retraced his steps 
to Harvard, where he arrived July 1, lst>4, joining his father, who had 
an interest in a general store at that place, and being taken into partner- 
ship. Soon thereafter, he came to Chicago to buy goods, and on this trip 
secured Prescott's "Conquest of Mexico.'* which he claims opened the 
door for him into a new world and inspired him to strive to educate him- 
self and gain an understanding of the higher things. Mr. Aver has pros- 
pered in a material way since that day, but he is far prouder that he was 
the first president of the Field Museum, and chairman of the collection 
committee, trustee of the Art Institute, director of the Chicago Historical 
Society, president of the Archaeological Society, member of the Missouri 
and Wisconsin Historical societies, member of the Chicago Commercial 
Club, director and advisor of the Crerar Library, and a recognized bib- 
liophile of international reputation. 

His collections embrace African jewels, illuminated manuscripts, 
Korans, Persian manuscripts, laces, furniture, porcelains, lusters, pew- 
ters, embroidery stuffs, Navajo, Mexican, Algerian and Tunisian blan- 
kets and many other articles of great value. At the Newberry Library 
are two rooms which bear his name in which are to be found 17,000 vol- 
umes of printed books and 4,000 separate manuscripts, some of them 
volumes; thousands of printed maps; 300 manuscripts; 2,62.") portraits 
or drawings by artists in the field, 390 prints, 9,770 photographs, includ- 
ing 8,000 of "The Pictorial History of the Philippines;" sixteen editions 
and different works of John Smith, twenty-two editions of Hennepin, 
twenty editions of Jonathan Carver, titty-three editions of Las Casas, 
every early edition of Champlain, every early edition of Lescarbot, every 
early edition of Sagard, about 3,000 volumes in the Indian languages, cov- 
ering 220 tribes in America, thirty-eight in the Philippines, and one in 
the Sandwich Islands; the finest set of Ptolemy known, sixty volumes 
including five in manuscript ; one of the great collections of Ortelius and 
Apianus and general geographical atlases; thirty-nine out of the forty- 
one Cremaisi in existence in the original editions ; the twenty-six Gilmary 
Shea: the eight O'Callaghan; all of the Margry; the Cleveland edition 
of over seventy volumes; the Quebec edition and many manuscripts; and 



HISTORY OP McHENRY COUNTY 471 

100 Mexican pietographs on maguey paper and leather; as well as first 
and early editions on all parts of North America pertaining especially to 
Indian history, including 351 titles of Captivities; 1,260 of the 2,625 por- 
traits and drawings are by Burbank, 400 are by Waldeck, fifty by Carl 
Bodnier ; 250 are lead-pencil portraits by Catlin, with a short biography 
of each. What Mr. A,yer considers the very gem of his whole collection 
is Prescott's ''Conquest of Mexico" in three carefully tooled volumes 
bound in the very best Grolieresque red binding by Binder Zaehnsdorf, 
which were the first books he ever bought, about August 1, 1864, and the 
foundation of his great history of the North American Indian Library. 



EDWARD M. AYLWARD. 

Edward M. Aylward, senior member of the firm of Aylward Bros., 
breeders of high grade stock, is one of the foremost business men of 
Hebron, and he is the senior member of the grain house of Aylward, 
Slavin & Randall. He was born at Walworth, Wis., February 19, 1879, 
one of the nine children of his parents, Richard W. and Mary (Cleary) 
Aylward. Richard W. Aylward was born in Ireland, but came to the 
United States in 1850, and after a stay at Walworth, Wis., located in 
McHenry County, whei-e he still resides, having, during all of his active 
years, been a farmer. His wife died September 28, 1899. 

Edward M. Aylward attended the schools of McHenry County, and 
was reared upon his father's farm. He spent two years in railroading, 
and then in 1912, began breeding stock, specializing on Holstein cattle, 
and his annual business is now about $200,000. Mr. Aylward gives em- 
ployment to six people and he and his brother are recognized as leaders 
in their line. In 1918 Mr. Aylward formed a partnership with Messrs. 
Slavin and Randall for the purpose of handling grain, and this firm is 
doing an immense business. 

On September 25, 1901, Mr. Aylward was united in marriage with 
Miss May Monear, a daughter of Wallace Monear, and they have three 
children, namely: Viola M., Florence and Edward M. The family all 
belong to the Catholic Church. In politics Mr. Aylward is a Republican, 
but he has never taken an active part in public life, as his time has been 
too fully occupied with his business affairs. Mr. Aylward is proud of 
the fact that his father served his adopted country during the Civil War, 
enlisting in 1861, and being a brave soldier until his honorable discharge. 



172 HISTORY OP McHENRY COUNTY 

The family is one of the mosl highly esteemed in McHenry County, and 
Mr. Aylward is a worthy member of it. 



FRANK F. AX TELL. 



Frank F.Axtell, president of the First State Bank of Harvard, and 
one of the most prominent men of McHenry County, is generally recog- 
nized as one of the representative financiers of this part of the state. 
He was born in New York state. October 29, 1847, only child of Alonzo 
E. and Mary M. (Lambert) Axtell. Alonzo E. Axtell was born in 
New York state, and, coming to Harvard, became interested in mer- 
chandising upon an extensive scale. He was also one of the early 
bankers of McHenry County, and developed into a very prominenl and 
influential man. 

Frank F. Axtell attended the schools of Boone County. 111., where the 
family located in 1851, and Harvard, where they came in 1858. His 
first employment was as a clerk in his father's store, and he remained 
with him until 1889, when he organized, as a private concern, the bank 
of which he is now the executive head, and re-organized it as a state bank 
in 1909. Mr. Axtell is a member of the American Bankers Association 
and the Illinois Bankers Association, and he was associated with the 
Chicago Board of Trade for a number of years. 

Mr. Axtell was married to Miss Cynthia A. Austin, a daughter of 
Pasco Austin, and they have one son, E. E. Axtell, who is the cashier of 
the bank of which his father is president. A daughter, Darline V., 
died in 1911. She was born in 1882, was a graduate of Vassar College, 
and a lovely girl, only tw-enty-nine years of age at the time of her death. 
Mr. Axtell is a Republican. Ever since he came to Harvard lie has 
taken an intelligent and effective interest in its development, and is 
justly numbered among its most representative men anil desirable 
citizens. 



CHARLES W. BAILEY. 



Charles W. Bailey, M. I)., one of the leading physicians and surgeons 
of McHenry County, is successfully engaged in a general practice at 
Hebron, and he is also connected with the financial life of the city as a 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 473 

director of the Bank of Hebron. He was born at Denver, Colo., the only 
child of his parents, Jefferson A. and Eliza (Bringham) Bailey. Jeffer- 
son A. Bailey was engaged in farming for many years in the vicinity of 
Walworth, Wis., but his wife died in 1874. 

Doctor Bailey attended the common and high schools of Illinois, and 
then took a course at the Northwestern University, from which he was 
graduated in 1895, following which he took a medical course in the med- 
ical department of the same institution. Doctor Bailey then took a course 
at Rush Medical College, and was graduated in 1900, and for the suc- 
ceeding year was interne at St. Mary's Hospital of Milwaukee, Wis. He 
then located at Hebron, where he has since remained. In August, 1918, 
Doctor Bailey was commissioned captain in the medical corps for service 
during the World War, and was at Camps Greenleaf and Forest for 
three months. On December 23, 1918, he was honorably discharged, and 
returning to Hebron, resumed his practice, which is a very large one, 
for his patients have great confidence in his skill and knowledge. He 
belongs to the county," state and American medical associations. 

In 1904 Doctor Bailey was married to Miss Ida Groesbeck, a daughter 
of William Groesbeck, and a member of an old pioneer family of Me- 
Henry County. Doctor and Mrs. Bailey have the following children: 
Alice E., who was born in 1906 ; Francis J., who was born in 1909, and 
John W., who was born in 1914. The fraternal connections of Doctor 
Bailey are with Hebron Lodge No. 604, A. F. & A. M. ; Harvard Chapter 
No. 91, R. A. M. ; Cavalry Commandery No. 25, K. T., and he is also a 
Shriner. Politically, he is a Republican. Recognizing the weight Doctor 
Bailey's name would have, the Bank of Hebron induced him to consent 
to serve upon its directorate in December, 1916. As a medical man and 
citizen, Doctor Bailey has proven his sterling worth, and no one stands 
any higher in public esteem in this part of the state, than does he. 



SOLOMON BAIRD. 
Page 132. 

JOHN BALDOCK. 



John Baldock, who is now living retired at Alden, was formerly 
extensively engaged in business as a lumber and feed merchant, and he 
has also served his township as supervisor. He was born in England, 



474 HISTORY OP McIIENRY COUNTY 

August 16, 1846, one of four children born to his parents, Matthew and 
Susan (Coy) Baldock, also natives of England, who came to the United 
States in 1852, locating at what is now Chemung, but was then known 
as Big Foot. Later Matthew Baldock moved to Alden, where he died 
in 1S93. 

John Baldock attended the common schools of Harvard, and grew 
up in McHenry County. After having been engaged in farming for 
some years, in 1890 he organized a lumber and feed business, and con- 
ducted it until 1910, when he sold it to his son, Jay L. Baldock, and his 
son-in-law, Nathan B. Clawson, who conduct it under the name of 
Baldock & Clawson. In February, 1865, Mr. Baldock enlisted for 
service during the Civil War, and was discharged, September 25, 1865, 
and he has been a member of the local post G. A. R. since its organiza- 
tion. He is a Republican, and was elected supervisor of Alden Town- 
ship, and served for sixteen years, and he was a justice of the peace for 
eleven years. 

In 1869 Mr. Baldock was married to Miss Mary A. Seward, who died 
in 1871. Later he was married (second) to Miss Roxie A. Ferris, who 
belonged to a well known McHenry County family. She died February 
9, 1913. By his second marriage Mr. Baldock had two children, namely: 
Jessie M., who is the wife of Nathan B. Clawson and has had the following 
children — Frank, George and Eugene, the last two died in childhood; and 
Jay L., who married Edith Snell, a daughter of John Snell, and they have 
two daughters, Florence and Dorothy. The family all belong to the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Baldock is highly esteemed by all 
who know him, and his prosperity is well deserved. 



AMORY BARBER. 



Aniory Barber, one of the farmers of Riley Township who is con- 
nected with some of the leading families of McHenry County, deserves 
a place in a record of this high class. He was born in the village of 
Java, Wyoming County, N. Y., a son of Humphrey and Maria (Potter) 
Barber, natives of Massachusetts and New York, respectively, who 
came to McHenry County in 1851, to join her brother, Almon Potter, 
who had already settled in this region, taking up government land. 
Humphrey Barber entered forty acres of land, now owned by Amory 
Barber, which is located seven miles south of Marengo, nine miles west 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 475 

of Huntley, and there he died at the age of sixty-eight years, and she 
when eighty-six, in 1901, having survived him for twenty years. In 
addition to farming, Humphrey Barber discharged the duties of a justice 
of the peace for many years, having his office in his residence. He was 
a Universalist. The children born to him and his wife were as follows: 
Lester, who lived at home for some time, moved to Coral Township, 
then retired to Marengo, where he died about 1916; Lucinda, who mar- 
ried William Mallory, died in McHenry County, leaving one child; 
Lucius, who enlisted at the outbreak of the Civil War in Company D, 
Fifteenth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, served through the war, was cap- 
tured at Acksworth and confined in Andersonville prison, from which he 
was later exchanged, but not until his health was undermined, and he 
died a number of years ago from the effects of the hardships he endured ; 
Amanda, who married W. B. Sheldon, a farmer of McHenry County, 
died here as did her husband; ,Nivvie, who married W. B. Mallory after 
the death of her sister, died a few years later, but he survives and makes 
his home at Elgin; Rose, who married F. E. Stevens of Coral Township; 
and Amory, whose name heads this review. 

Amory Barber owns the homestead of his father, which comprises 
eighty acres of land. Formerly he carried on dairying almost exclu- 
sively, but of later years has devoted more time to grain production. 
He is a strong Republican and has served as supervisor of Riley Town- 
ship, and as a justice of the peace. 



RICHARD W. BARDWELL. 

Richard W. Bardwell, superintendent of the public schools of Wood- 
stock, and one of the leading educators of this part of Illinois, is held in 
the highest esteem by all who have the honor of his acquaintance. He 
was born at Tipton, Iowa, May 14, 1889, a son of Conrad Myron and 
Anna Louise (Wollbcn) Bardwell, the former of whom was born at 
Northampton, Mass., October 9, 1860, and the latter at Marengo, 111., 
December 9, 1867. 

The Bardwell family was founded in America in 1720 by Robert 
Bardwell, who landed from England at Boston, Mass., in that year. 
On the maternal side, the family originated in Scotland, and came from 
thence to the United States, locating in Illinois. Conrad M. Bardwell 
is a man of high standing and considerable influence among the educators 



476 HISTORY OF McHENR"? COUNTY 

of the state, and for many years has been superintended of differenl 

public schools. He is a man of force of character, bill also one of fine 
human qualities, with a large circle of friends both within his profession 
and out. lie has been honored with various offices within the associa- 
tions of education, and in 1909 he was president of the State Teachers 
Association. 

Richard W. Bardwell was graduated from the University of Illinois, 
and immediately thereafter accepted the principalship of the schools of 
Hebron, 111., holding this position during 1910 and 1911, when he took 
the same position at Delavan, 111., remaining there until 1914, when he 
came to Woodstock, where his career has been eminently satisfactory in 
every respect, and his schools and pupils show a remarkable improvement 
under his supervision. 

On July 10, 1912, Mr. Bardwell was married, at Evanston, 111., to 
( iertrude Smith. She is a daughter of Townscnd and ( 'harlot te (MiddeU) 
Smith, natives of Beverly, England. Mr. Smith is deceased, but for 
years was a well known real-estate broker of Chicago. Mr. and Mrs. 
Bardwell have the following children: Elizabeth, who was born May 2, 
1913; and Richard M., Jr., who was born September 21, 1915. Mr. 
Bardwell belongs to Hebron Lodge No. 604, A. F. & A. M , and the 
Order of the Eastern Star, and he is also a member of the college frater- 
nities of Psi Upsilon and Phi Delta Phi. 



EDWARD C. BARNARD. 

Edward C. Barnard, now deceased, was one of the well known figures 
in McHenry County business life, and owned and operated the mill at 
Solon Mills in Richmond Township. He was born at Solon Mills, 
October 19, 1S48, and died June 11, 1918, in his seventieth year. He 
was a son of George and Ruth (Yates) Barnard, the latter being a de- 
scendant of Lord Wellington of England. George Barnard owned a 
farm near Greenwood where he died, and was a farmer and miller, 
operating a mill at Solon Mills for many years. Both he and his wife 
lived to an old age. One of their sons, Ensley Barnard is conducting 
the old farm near Greenwood. 

Edward ( '. Barnard learned the milling business and for a time 
operated a mill at Silver Lake, near Cary Station. Later he bought a 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 477 

mill from a Mr. Northrup five miles south of Richmond, on the Nip- 
persink, and operated it from 1884 until 1911, when his health failing, 
he sold it. The old mill still stands, but has not been operated for 
some years, although the water power is excellent. Mr Barnard also 
owned 300 acres of land in the vicinity of his mill, but he left the farm 
in 1916 to move to Richmond. 

Mr. Barnard was married his bride being eighteen years old at that 
time. Mr. and Mrs. Barnard had one son, Earl Clement Barnard. He 
married Bertha Marsh, and they have a son, Clement. Earl C. Barnard 
has spent some time in Kansas, but is now living with his mother, and 
the farm is rented. Mr. Barnard was a public-spirited man, of high 
standing in his community. He was a charter member of Nunda Lodge, 
A. F. & A. M., and later was connected with the Masonic lodge at 
Richmond. 



CHARLES P. BARNES. 

Charles P. Barnes at present County Judge of McHenry County, has 
an extensive acquaintance among the judges and lawyers throughout 
Northern Illinois, on account of the many important jury cases he has 
conducted in his own and the adjoining counties, and his ability as a 
successful criminal lawyer is admitted by all. 

He was born in the town of Nunda, in the county of McHenry, 111., 
on February 14, 1862, a son of Charles C. and Lydia (Sayles) Barnes, 
the former being killed at the Siege of Vicksburg in 1863, as a soldier 
in the Union Army, leaving a widow and two children, besides Judge 
Barnes. When eleven years old he commenced working out by the 
month and, in the summer of 1873, worked eight months for the com- 
pensation of $7 per month. He worked for his board in winters, and 
attended the district schools, and at the age of eighteen years became 
a stationary engineer for the Clayson Drying Company, at Nunda. 
From his boyhood he had taken a deep interest in law suits, and often 
walked several miles to hear the trial of a case before a justice of the 
peace and early acquired a desire to become a lawyer. During the fall 
and early winter preceding his commencement of the study of law, in 
a regular law office, he conducted five cases before justices of the peace 
at Nunda and Crystal Lake, and won four of the five. 



478 HISTORY OP McHENRY COUNTY 

In March 1881 being then only nineteen years of ago, he entered 
the law office of Attorney O. II. Gilmore at Woodstock, and 
worked on a farm near the outskirts of the city for his board, 

in order that lie might pursue his law studies. After spending a little 
over one year in the office of Attorney 0. II. Gilmore, who later became 
County .Judge, he entered the office of former County Judge B. N. 
Smith, and from that office went before the Appellate Court at Ottawa 
in the month of March, 1883, and passed a successful examination and 
was admitted to the bar of this state, and immediately entered upon 
the practice of law in the City of Woodstock, where he has lived con- 
tinuously until the present time. 

In July 1885, he formed a partnership with Hon. Merritt L. Joslyn, 
who was Assistant Secretary of the Interior during the administration 
of President Arthur, and for nearly three years the firm practiced law 
together under the firm name of Joslyn & Barnes. Later he was as- 
sociated with Attorney D. T. Smiley under the firm name of Barnes & 
Smiley, and this partnership continued for nearly three years. For a 
short time, he was in partnership with Attorney John J. Cooney, now 
deceased, who at one time was a student in his office. Attorneys D. T. 
Smiley, F. R. Jackman, F. B. Bennett, John J. Cooney, Arthur J. Mul- 
len and J. I. Lang all studied law in his office, and all passed successful 
examinations before the Appellate Court for admission to the bar. 

Judge Barnes has acted for the defense in some of the most cele- 
brated criminal trials that have ever taken place in the Circuit Court 
of his county, and has an enviable record as a successful jury lawyer. 
He enjoys the unusual distinction of never having a jury return a ver- 
dict against his side on which the client could be sentenced to the peni- 
tentiary. 

He is Republican in politics, but in 1912 stood with the Roosevelt 
movement under the head of the Bull Moosers and was chairman of 
the Roosevelt movement in McHenry County. In 1916 he sought the 
Republican nomination for states attorney having for his opponents, 
Attorneys D. R. Joslyn, then states attorney, and V. S. Lumley, who 
had previously served in that capacity and in the three-cornered fight, 
he was defeated by Mr. Lumley who received the nomination. In the 
fall of 1918, after helping Attorney Calvin J. Hendricks of Harvard to 
secure the Republican nomination he was placed on the ticket to fill 
the vacancy caused by the death of Attorney Hendricks and as County 
Judge has made a record that is highly commended by the attorneys 
and the people who have had business before his court. 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 479 

C. PERCY BARNES. 

C. Percy Barnes, attorney, junior member of the legal firm of 
Barnes & Barnes, is one of the able young men of Woodstock, and is 
associated with his distinguished father in the practice of his profession. 
He was born at Woodstock, May 22, 1886, one of the three children 
of his parents, Charles P. and Lanta (Young) Barnes. 

C. Percy Barnes attended the local schools, and Kent Law School 
of Chicago, from which he was graduated in 1908, thus following in his 
father's footsteps, and adopting the law as his profession. Immediately 
thereafter he was admitted to the bar, and locating at Woodstock, has 
since been in an active practice, his father being the senior member 
of the firm of Barnes & Barnes. In 1910, C. Percy Barnes was elected 
city attorney of Woodstock, which office he still holds. 

C. Percy Barnes was married to Miss Ruth Freestone, and he and 
his wife are members of the Congregational Church of Woodstock. 
In politics he is a Republican. His knowledge of men and their motives, 
and his keen, analytical mind enable him to handle the cases entrusted 
to him efficiently and successfully, and he has been connected with some 
very important jurisprudence that is not confined to the boundaries of 
his own county. 



DARWIN A. BARROWS. 

Darwin A. Barrows, who belongs to one of the prominent pioneer 
families of McHenry County, is serving his township as assessor, and 
is numbered among the representative retired farmers of Harvard. 
He was born in the county, a son of Dexter and Olive E. (Simpson) 
Barrows, who had eight children. Dexter Barrows was born in Ver- 
mont, but came to McHenry County in an early day, and became one 
of the prosperous farmers of this section. He lived to the unusual age 
of ninety-three years. 

Darwin A. Barrows was reared on his father's farm, and attended 
the local schools. During the Civil War, he enlisted in Company E, 
Ninety-fifth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, although only sixteen years 
old, and served until the close of hostilities, when he was mustered out. 
Returning home, he resumed farming, and became the owner of a valu- 
able farm in Dunham Township. A few years ago he retired from his 
agricultural activities, and located at Harvard, where he owns his com- 



ISO HISTORY OF McHBNEY COUNTY 

fortable residence. A man of mure than average ability, he lias been 
called upon to hold public office, and for seventeen years he was town 
clerk and he has hern township assessor for five terms. 

On June 15, L870, Mr. Barrows was married to Marion E. Billings, 
and they had the following children: Mildred, who married Ernes! F. 
Goodknecht; Nellie (!., who married Archie (liven, and Marion, who 
married Gardner A. Knapp, superintendent of the county home at 
Hartland. 



EBER E. BASSETT. 



Eber E. Bassett, postmaster of West McHenry, is one of the sub- 
stantial men of McHenry County, and one who has long; been appreciated 
by his fellow citizens. His appointment came as the just reward of 
faithful service to the government as a rural free delivery carrier, and 
since taking hold of the office, he has increased very materially its 
annual business, and the efficiency of the service. Mr. Bassett was 
reappointed to the office in September, 1917, and he has one assistant 
under him. His appointment followed the raising of the office to 
third class. 

Eber E. Bassett was born in McHenry County, June 17, 1875, one 
of the two children of Wilbur F., born in Ohio, and Jennie (Earl) Bassett. 
born in Vermont. W. F. Bassett came to McHenry in 1854, with his 
parents, John E. and Celestia Bassett. 

Jennie (Earl) Bassett came to McHenry in 1868. For some years 
following their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Bassett were engaged in farming, 
but are now retired. Eber E. Bassett attended the local schools, and 
took a business course at the Elgin Academy during the fall and winter 
of 1896-97. Until 1905, he was engaged in farming, but in that year 
became a letter carrier on the rural free delivery route, and continued as 
such until his appointment as postmaster in 1914. He is a Republican 
in politics. On December 18, 1S97, he was married to Miss Cora 
Martin, a daughter of Peter S. and Wealthy A. (Farmer) Martin, and 
they have two children, namely: Lisle E., and Floribel. The family 
belong to the Methodist Episcopal Church of West McHenry. Mr. 
Bassett's fraternal affiliations are with the Modern Woodmen of America, 
and Mrs. Bassett is a member of the Royal Neighbors. Accommodating 
and capable, Mr. Bassett is giving universal satisfaction as postmaster, 



HISTORY OF McHEXRY COUNTY 481 

and is correctly regarded as one of the most representative men of his 
community. 



ROCKWELL M. BEAN. 

Rockwell M. Bean, assessor of Seneca Township, and one of the 
leading farmers of McHenry County, owns and operates a fine rural 
property known as Maple Farm, which is located three and one-half 
miles northeast of Marengo, and eight miles southwest of Woodstock. 
He was born on his grandfather's old home farm, October 10, 1863, a 
son of William and Philenia (Mead) Bean, and grandson of Simeon Bean 
of New Hampshire. William Bean was also born in New Hampshire, 
but when he was eight years old his father brought him to Illinois, and 
in 1836 secured government land in the woods of McHenry County. 
Simeon Bean was a leading man of those early days, and lived to be 
sixty years of age. A man of educational advantages far beyond those 
of his associates, he was called upon to attend to much public business, 
as well as settle estates and act as administrator of estates. Both he 
and his wife were school-teachers in New Hampshire, and after coming 
to McHenry County he continued to teach during the winter months, 
and at one time was county superintendent of schools. His children 
weru as follows: Ellen, who married Daniel Fellows, died at St. Charles, 
111., at the age of fifty years; Louise, who married Allen Paddock, is 
deceased, having passed away at the Paddock home in New York, but 
she and her husband are both interred in the new cemetery at Marengo; 
Joseph, who died at the age of twenty years while a student at college; 
John, who lives in Minnesota; and William, who was the oldest born. 

William Bean spent two years at Waterloo, Iowa, but returned to 
McHenry County, and securing the old homestead, lived upon it until 
his death, in August, 1907, three years subsequent to the death of his 
wife. He erected the buildings now standing on the Bean farm, and 
made other improvements, which are now being enjoyed by outsiders 
as the farm was sold after his death. He was a leader in his community, 
public spirited and able and served twenty-one years as a member of 
the school board. The Presbyterian church of Marengo had in him 
one of its most active workers and devout members. William Bean and 
his wife had the following children: Frank W., who left home at the 
age of sixteen years to go to Nebraska, attended college, became a 



482 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

minister of the Methodist Episcopal church, and died at Clay Center, 
Nebr., August 24, 1918; Carlton S., who is a farmer of Davenport, 
Nebr.; Rockwell M., whose name heads this review; William K., who 
is a fruitgrower of Michigan; Mae, who is Mrs. L. J. Hand of Marengo; 
and Rose, who is Mrs. Edward Thomas of Belvidere, 111. 

On October 12, 1887, Rockwell M. Bean was united in marriage witli 
Marian Drury, a daughter of L. and Roxa (Angier) Drury, natives of 
Massachusetts. Following his marriage Mr. Bean spent three years 
on a large rented farm owned by H. W. Belding, and then went to 
Davenport, Nebr., operating 600 acres of land, a portion of which he 
had purchased, and remained there for seven years. Here he met with 
disaster in the form of continuous droughts so that for the years he was 
there he made nothing and was glad to get away alive. When he finally 
arrived in McHenry County he had only twenty-eight cents in cash, 
and had to provide for his family comprising a wife and two little children. 
In addition to all this he had a debt of 81,000, and in order to secure 
his present farm he had to go still deeper into debt, but during the sub- 
sequent years he has cleared off his obligations, and not only has a 
valuable farm, but excellent buildings. His barn is a basement one and 
he has accommodations for twenty cows, for he specializes in dairying. 
Both he and Mrs. Bean are consistent members of the Baptist church, 
and he served for eight years consecutively as superintendent of the 
Sunday school of his church, and for one year was county superintendent 
of the temperance department. In 1918 Mr. Bean was elected assessor 
of his township, and has proven very acceptable to the people. Mr. 
and Mrs. Bean have three children, namely: Arthur W., who married 
Cora M. Lowe, has a son, Clarence A., and conducts a garage at Marengo; 
Myron, who is on a farm near his father, married Caroline L. Lundy, 
and has two children, Marion L. and Marjorie W. ; and Harold, who 
is at home. He went into the service under the First Draft, but was 
rejected after reaching the training camp in Georgia on account of 
disability. All of the sons have had high-school educations, and are 
young men of ability and a superior order of integrity. 



ALFRED G. BEATH. 



Alfred G. Beath, one of the foremost men of Marengo, owns and 
operates a fine, modern mercantile establishment, and is regarded as 







1 




HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 483 

an excellent representative of the best business interests of McHenry 
County. He was born in England, June 17, 1851, one of the eight 
children of his parents, Robert and Sarah (Peck) Beath. Robert Beath 
was a baker by trade, and not liking conditions in England, he brought 
his family to the United States, settling at Rockford, 111. 

Alfred G. Beath was reared at Rockford, having been brought there 
when four years old, and attended its common and high schools. Learn- 
ing the trade of a baker, he worked at it, and November 6, 1883, he 
established himself in the baking business at Marengo, conducting it 
until 1912, when he branched out as a general merchant, and now 
carries a stock valued at $10,000, and owns the building in which it 
is located. 

In 1879 Mr. Beath was united in marriage with Miss Catherine 
Pherris, and they had one child, Mabel, who married Doctor Ashbaugh, 
one of the leading physicians and surgeons of Marengo. Mrs. Beath 
died in 1915. Mr. Beath belongs to the Episcopal Church. Politically 
he is a Republican, and he was elected a justice of the peace in 1918. 
He is a Mason, and is High Priest of Lansing Chapter No. 73; and 
belongs to Calvary Commandery, of Woodstock, and Tibutu Shrine, of 
Rockford, Illinois. Having traveled extensively and being an exhaustive 
reader, Mr. Beath is one of the best posted men of Marengo, and his 
advice is often sought by those who realize that they can rely upon his 
store of knowledge and good judgment. 



EDWARD C. BELL. 



Edward C. Bell, one of the substantial farmers of McHenry Town- 
ship, owns and operates a farm on the outskirts of Ringwood. He was 
born two miles north of Ringwood, in McHenry Township, May 6, 
1856, a son of John B. and Nancy (Coates) Bell, both natives of Ireland, 
who were married in England, and soon thereafter came to the United 
States. Immediately after landing in this country they came direct 
to Ringwood, reaching it in 1851 or possibly in 1852. For a short 
period they resided in the village of Ringwood, and then moved on the 
farm of eighty acres on which Edward C. Bell was born. It was a new 
farm with poor buildings, but John B. Bell was an excellent farmer 
and business man and improved his property and added to his farm 
until he owned between 500 and 600 acres. Later on in life, he moved 



48-4 HISTORY OP McHENRY COUNTY 

to Ringwood, 1 milt a large house, ami he died there in September, L905, 
aged eighty-two years; his widow surviving him about twelve years, 

dying when eighty-seven years old. 

Edward C. Boll was reared on the farm, and adopted farming as his 
life work. For twenty-five years he rented land from his father, and 
then boughl 240 acres in Richmond Township, four miles north of 
Ringwood, remaining on it eleven years, during that period developing 
it into a dairy farm. He enlarged the bam and made other improve- 
ments, and then sold it in 1911, and bought his present farm of fifty 
acres adjoining Ringwood. The buildings are in excellent condition, 
and the house was erected by James Green after the loss of the original 
one by fire. Since buying this property Air. Roll has built a silo and 
now carries on general farming, although on his other farm he bud 
eat tie of the Ilolstein strain. 

On February 10, 18S1 Mr. Bell was married to Florence Motley, 
of Richmond Township, a daughter of Robert and Ann (Silli Motley, 
natives of England, Mrs. Motley having been born in the same section 
of Yorkshire as Mr. Bell's father, and Mr. Motley was born in Lincoln- 
shire. They were married in Mclienry County, and lived on their 
farm until Mrs. Motley died. Mr. and Mrs. Bell have the following 
children: Louis, who is conducting the farm; Robert, who died at the 
age of twenty years; Bertha, who is Mrs. Esh of Spring Grove; Walter, 
who died in 1918, aged thirty years; Mary, who is Mrs. Glenn Esh of 
Spring Grove; and Howard, who is at home. 



FRED B. BENNETT. 



Fred B. Bennett, one of the prominent lawyers of McHenry County, 
real estate owner, and a director of the United State Bank of ( Yystal 
Lake, is recognized as a representative man of his locality. He was 
born in Lake County, Illinois, August 2G, 1871, one of three children 
of his parents, John K. and Louisa (Lytle) Bennett, well-known farmers 
of Lake County, both now deceased. 

Fred B. Bennett attended the local schools of Cuba Township, Lake 
County, and the high school of Barrington, Cook County. Illinois. He 
then read law with Hon. C. P. Barnes of Woodstock, ami was sub- 
sequently admitted to the bar. Immediately thereafter, he commenced 
the practice of his profession in the office of Mr. Barnes, later leaving 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 485 

to form a law partnership with Frank R. Jackman, the firm being 
known as Jackman & Bennett. This association continued for about 
eight years and until the death of Mr. Jackman in 1908, since which 
time Mr. Bennett has continued the practice of law alone. He is the 
legal advisor of the Hoy Banking Company of McHenry, and of the 
Ringwood Bank, and the United States Bank of Crystal Lake, and is 
a recognized authority on real estate and corporation law. In politics, 
a Republican, he has served as city attorney for Huntley and McHenry, 
and is in every respect one of the leading men of the county. 

In 1898 Mr. Bennett was married to Miss Kate C. Hibbard, a 
daughter of John L. Hibbard of Woodstock, and they have a daughter, 
Katherine R., who is at home. Mr. Bennett and his family belong to 
the Congregational Church. He is a Thirty-second Degree and Knight 
Templar Mason, being a past commander of Calvary Commandery 
No. 25, and also belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America and the 
Royal Arcanum. A profound scholar and able lawyer, Mr. Bennett is 
naturally well versed upon many subjects, and his advice is sought by 
all classes. 



FILLMORE S. BENNETT. 
Page 151. 



WALTER C. BESLEY. 



Walter C. Besley, D. D. S., one of the leading dental surgeons of 
McHenry County, is engaged in an active practice at Woodstock, where 
he is held in the highest esteem, not only in a professional capacity, but 
personally as well. He was born at Chicago, 111., July 27, 1875, a son 
of George W. and Sophia (Cone) Besley, who had three children. George 
W. Besley was for thirty years a druggist of McHenry, McHenry 
County, later on moved to Woodstock, where he died in January, 1916, 
his wife having previously passed away. 

After attending the local schools of McHenry County, and the 
McHenry High School, Walter C. Besley took a course in dentistry at 
the Northwestern University, from which he was graduated in 1897, 
and immediately thereafter embarked in a general practice at Wood- 



isii HISTORY OP McHBNRY COUNTY 

stock, where he has since remained. His offices are conveniently 
located over the State Bank of Woodstock. 

On June 6, 1900, Doctor Besley was married to Miss Cora G. Bennett, 
and they have the following children: George V., and Walter B. Doctor 
Besley and his family belong to the Congregational Church of Wood- 
stock. In politics he is a Republican, and for the past eight years he 
has served continuously as a member of the city council. He is a 
Mason, an Odd Fellow, and an Elk, and prominent in all of these orders. 
Skilled in his profession, his success with his patients has resulted in 
the building up of a large and constantly increasing practice, and the 
establishment of his reputation as a very valuable citizen in his 
community. 



GUSTAVUS F. BINNEWIES. 

Gustavus F. Binnewies, one of the retired farmers of Harvard, was 
formerly very active in agricultural matters in McHenry County, and 
still owns his farm in Dunham Township. He was born on this farm, 
three miles southwest of Harvard, August 22, 1858, a son of Christian 
and Caroline (Kappenberg) Binnewies, natives of Germany. The 
parents came to the United States in 1853, and after a stay in Pennsyl- 
vania, moved to McHenry County, 111., where they bought a small 
farm, adding to it until they had 160 acres, and forty acres of timber 
in another farm. The original house is still in use, although different 
additions and many improvements have been made to it. The father 
put about half the farm under cultivation, carrying on general farming. 
He came to this country with nothing, but owing to the opportunities 
here offered, he was able to acquire a valuable property. His death 
occurred on the farm, October 16, 1886, at the age of sixty-seven years. 
His widow survives and makes her home with her son, G. F. Binnewies. 
Of their children, four now survive, namely: Anna, who lives with her 
mother and brother; Minnie, who married Harve McWilhams, who is 
a factory man living at Harvard; Carrie, who married Henry Hopper- 
stead, who is in a store at Capron; and Gustavus F. One son died at 
the age of nineteen years while attending Rockford College and Ida, 
Josephine and Caroline are also deceased. 

Gustavus F. Binnewies remained on the homestead and took charge 
of it when his father was taken sick, and he is still interested in it, 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 487 

although for the past fifteen years he has lived in Dunham Township. 
The present tenant had been on the farm for fifteen years, and he is 
Mr. Binnewies' partner in handling stock. With his leaving the farm, 
Mr. Binnewies did not lose interest in it, but has kept up the improve- 
ments, and has a very fine property, that he holds at a high figure. 

Mr. Binnewies has never married, his sister, Miss Anna being house- 
keeper for him and his aged mother. He is a Republican, but aside 
from being a school director, as was his father before him, Mr. Binnewies 
has not cared to hold office. In the early days of McHenry County, 
the home of the Binnewies family was the stopping place for the traveling 
ministers of the German Evangelical faith who used to hold services 
in the schoolhouses of the neighborhood. When a church of this creed 
was established at Harvard, they attended it, and gave it their support. 
Mr. Binnewies is recognized as one of the representative men of his 
country, and his family is justly numbered among the pioneer ones of 
this region. 



RICHARD BISHOP. 

Page 131. 

FRED A. BOHLANDER. 

Fred A. Bohlander, one of the leading merchants of McHenry 
County, owns and operates a fine dry goods establishment at West 
McHenry, and he is also a director of the West McHenry State Bank. 
He was born at Monroe, 111., May 21, 1863, one of the seven children 
born to his parents. His father, Peter Bohlander, was born in Germany, 
but came to the United States in 1833. He lived at West Chicago, 
moving thence to South Chicago, and finally to Monroe, 111., where he 
died in 1901. His wife, whose maiden name was Schroeder, died 
in 1894. 

Fred A. Bohlander was reared on his father's farm, and early learned 
to make himself useful in its conduct. He attended the local schools, 
and was well grounded in the common branches. When he left home 
to start in business on his own account, he connected himself with the 
wholesale shoe trade, continuing in it until 1901, when he came to West 



I— HISTORY OF McHBNBY COUNTY 

McHenry and founded his present house. He carries a full and com- 
plete line of ready-to-wear garments for women, men's furnishing 
goods, clothing, groceries, shoes and rubber goods, tin and granite ware, 
notions, toys and all goods ordinarily carried by a modern department 
store. His stock is a very large and comprehensive one, and the prices 
are as low as is consistent with the quality and service. In August, 
1916, Mr. Pohlander was elected a director of the West McHenry 
State Bank, his association giving added prestige to that institution. 

In 1S90 Mr. Bohlander was married to Miss Anna Warneke, a 
daughter of August Warneke, of Will County, 111., and they have one 
son, Roy, who is now at Sycamore, 111., married Viola Cole. Mr. and 
Mrs. Bohlander belong to the Evangelical Protestant Church. In 
political faith, he is a Republican. A man of importance in his com- 
munity, Mr. Bohlander was connected with the various movements 
connected with the war activities here, and has otherwise proven his 
good citizenship and worth as a man. 



WILLIAM A. BOIES. 



William A. Boies, one of the most highly respected men of McHenry 
County, who was formerly a successful agriculturalist of Coral Town- 
ship, is now living retired on his fine farm one mile west of Marengo. 
He was born at Homer, Courtland County, N. Y., December 15, 1841, 
a son of Israel and Mary (Ives) Boies, the former born in Massachusetts, 
and the latter in Connecticut. The Horace Boies, one time governor of 
Iowa, was a first cousin of Israel Boies, and the family is one found all 
over the country. In 1859 Israel Boies brought his family west to Dar- 
lington, Wis., where they lived for five years, and then came to McHenry 
County, settling at Marengo. 

William A. Boies was educated in New York. He was married, 
February 20, 1865, at Darlington, Wis., to Lottie Shimmins, who was 
born on Long Island, N. Y., Oct, 23, 1842, but brought to Wisconsin 
when a child. After his marriage, Mr. Boies rented his present farm, 
and during the period he was preparing to buy it, his father, Israel, 
dealt in cattle, buying at Darlington and shipping to Chicago, having 
had much experience in stock dealing in New York state. In fact it 
was the realization of the better opportunities he would have in the 
west to buy cattle that brought him to Wisconsin. During his earlier 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY ls;i 

experiences in the east, Israel Boies drove both cattle and sheep to 
the New York and Philadelphia markets, from rural regions, where 
he had bought them. In 1878 he went to Byron, 111., and established 
himself in a butter manufacturing business, and after he had sold it 
at a fair profit, he built another butter factory at Davis Junction, 111., 
and another at Genoa, 111., and operated the latter until 1882, when he 
returned to McHenry County and spent his remaining years at the 
home of his son, William A. Boies, in Coral Township. 

In the meanwhile William A. Boies had been associated in the stock 
business with his father, operating the Marengo end of it, but in 1868 
bought what had been the Orsan Rogers farm. Here during the follow- 
ing year he began making butter, producing his own milk and keeping 
forty cows. The butter was made by his mother, who was so expert 
that the demand for her product increased to such an extent that in 
1870, William A. Boies erected a building that is still standing, and in 
order to increase the output, began buying milk of his neighbors. In 
time he commenced shipping to eastern markets, receiving what was 
then considered a gilt-edged price, forty cents per pound. Ordinary 
butter then sold for twenty cents per pound. Until about 1875 Mr. 
Boies practically controlled the milk supply of his neighborhood, but 
his success encouraged others to enter his line, and similar creameries 
were established. His own butter was known as "Creamery" butter, 
and there was such a demand for it, especially in Rhode Island, that 
he could not supply it. Recognizing his ability, the owners of the other 
creameries endeavored to secure him as manager, and he undertook 
too many responsibilities, as during five years he had charge of nineteen 
creameries, one of them being in Boone County. Disaster overtook 
these many enterprises, numerous causes contributing, but the same 
condition prevailed all over the state. The men who had assumed 
management were carried down, and the majority of them lost their 
entire investment, and Mr. Boies was no exception. About 1884, the 
bottom having fallen out, a change began, which has resulted in the 
establishment of the present system of handling the milk. It is claimed 
that one contributing cause of failure was excessive speculation on 
the Board of Trade. While the project was not a success, the foundation 
was laid for the development of McHenry into the leading dairy county 
of Illinois. The early creameries had to contend with many difficulties, 
among them being the lack of proper equipment. They had no means 
of testing the milk, nor of preserving it, and disaster was certain. 

Mr. Boies shouldered his responsibilities, and went to work to clear 



490 HISTORY OF McHENBY COUNTY 

off his debts incurred by the inevitable bankruptcy. Although offered 
a very Battering position at a high salary in Pennsylvania, he borrowed 
sufficient money to go into general fanning, and through that calling 
rehabilitated himself financially among the people who had so highly 
trusted him. Here he raised Holstein cattle, and was very active until 
about 1918, when he retired. To liquidate his debts he sold his farm, 
but bought it back again in 1890, and still lives upon it. He owns 
588 acres on the Grant Highway. To his credit be it said that while 
he lost everything, no farmer who dealt with him was out a cent, al- 
though he could, had he cared to do so, have evaded many of his obli- 
gations. 

Mr. and Mrs. Boies have two children, namely: Philip, who operates 
the home farm, is unmarried, and lives at home; and Jessie M., who 
married N. L. Jackson, a real estate dealer of Belvidere, 111. While he 
is not connected with any religious organization, Mr. Boies attends the 
services of the Presbyterian Church of which his wife is a member, and 
he gives it a generous support. Looking back over his life, Mr. Boies 
takes great pleasure in the fact that in spite of disaster he has kept his 
name clean, and his credit good. At no time was that credit impaired, 
for his associates knew that his word was good as gold and that what 
he promised to carry out, he would do without any evasion, and time 
has proved this to be correct. Such a man is a valuable asset to any 
community, and Coral Township is proud of him and what he stands 
for. 



EMIL W. BOLLE. 



Emil W. Bolle, a general farmer and dairyman of Grafton Township, 
owns and operates 200 acres of valuable land. He was born in Switzer- 
land, May 21, 1868, a son of Charles and Mary (Corsell) Bolle, and a 
grandson of Joseph Bolle, a native of France. Charles Bolle was born 
in Germany, and was a civil engineer. 

Emil W. Bolle attended the common and high schools of Germany, 
and came to the United States in 1903, settling in McHcnry County. 
Prior to coming here, he was superintendent of a large tanning factory 
at Berlin, Germany. Since coming here, he has been engaged in farming. 
In 1913, he bought his present farm of 200 acres in Grafton Township, 
and he milks twenty-four cows. 




<UL -vrv c ^v^fJL- Sn^tw 



>u 




HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 491 

In 1893 Mr. Bolle was married to Teressa Risto, born in Germany. 
Mr. and Mrs. Bolle have the following children: Emil, Arthur, Hattie, 
Eugene, Agnes, Lucy and William. Mr. Bolle is an independent Repub- 
lican, casting the vote accorded him for the man he deems best fitted 
for the office in question. He belongs to the Odd Fellows and Mystic 
Workers of the World. The family belong to the Evangelical church. 
Thrift}' and hard working, he has made a success of his undertakings 
in his adopted country. 



FRED G. BOSSHARD. 



Fred G. Bosshard, president of the Woodstock Implement Com- 
pany, incorporated, is one of the live and energetic young business 
men of McHenry County, who deserves the success his efforts have 
brought him. He was born at La Crosse, Wis., June 11, 1886, one of 
the two children of Edward and Marie (Sulzer) Bosshard. Edward 
Bosshard was born in Wisconsin, in the city of Sauk, and in his home 
state his useful life was spent, he being for a number of years one of the 
substantial merchants of Sauk. He died in that city in 1893. 

At the age of eight Fred B. Bosshard went to Switzerland, and 
attended the graded and high schools of Winterthur. Returning to 
La Crosse in 1903 he took a course at the Keef College of La Crosse, 
from which he was graduated in 1905, following which he accepted a 
position with the La Crosse Plow Company as bookkeeper. Leaving 
that concern in 1910, he went to Beaver Dam, Wis., as head book- 
keeper of the J. S. Rowell Manufacturing Company, and from there 
came to Woodstock in 1912, and organized his present business under 
his own name. The following year it was incorporated as The Wood- 
stock Jmplement Company, with Alvin J. Eppel as secretary and 
treasurer. The firm handles farm machinery, tractors, gasoline engines, 
wagons, carriages, automobiles, tires and supplies, and does well work. 

In 1911 Mr. Bosshard was married to Miss Inga M. Solbery, a 
daughter of Louis Solbery, and they have one child, Winifred L. Mr. 
and Mrs. Bosshard belong to the Presbyterian church. In politics he 
is a Republican. His fraternal connections are with the Masonic order. 
The beautiful family residence at No. 418 Jefferson street is noted for 
its delightful hospitality, and here Mr. and Mrs. Bosshard entertain 
their many friends. 



192 BISTORT? OF Mi BENRY COUNTY 

J. L. BQSSLER. 

Now thai the supplying of the world as weD as this country with 
foodstuffs lias become of such paramount importance, the work of the 
fanner has increased in value ami dignity. Among those of McHenry 
County whose labors have been directed along t his exceedingly important 
line is ,1. L. Bossier of Greenwood Township. 

The birth of J. L. Bossier occurred on the farm he now owns and 
occupies, on Section 28, Greenwood Township, October 28, 1874, he 
being a son of John J. Bossier, born in France. When he came to the 
I'nited Slates, the father first located in Lake County, 111., migrating to 
McHenry County in the early sixties, and settling on section 28, Green- 
wood Township, where he developed a farm, and here died. He was 
married to Thressa Benisch, born in Austria, who survives him, and 
lives with her son, J. L. Bossier. They had a daughter, Minnie E., 
who is now deceased. 

J. L. Bossier was reared on the homestead, and alternated attending 
the district schools, with work on the farm, learning from experience 
how to be a practical agriculturalist. lie now owns 160 acres, twenty 
acres being in pasture, twenty acres in timber, and the remaining 120 
acres being the well tilled land of the homestead. Mr. Bossier has 
made many improvements on his farm. In politics he has always been 
independent, preferring to use his own judgment with reference to voting, 
rather than be bound down by party ties. He is a member of the Knights 
of Columbus, and belongs to the Catholic church, as does his mother. 
An industrious, capable man, he has well earned the confidence and 
esteem he inspires. 



ALBERT E. BOURNE. 
Page 132. 

JAMES THOMAS BOWER. 

James Thomas Bower, one of the retired business men and farmers 
living at Richmond, has been very active in the affairs of his township 
ami village, and faithfully discharged the duties of a number of public 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 493 

offices. lie was born at Chicago, December 8, 1S53, and comes of 
an old and honored family here, his father having been a heavy land- 
owner. When he was nineteen years old he left the homestead, and 
going to Fulton, 111., spent some time at that place, and then returned 
to McHenry County. In September, 1885, Mr. Bower was appointed 
postmaster of Richmond, and re-appointed under the second Cleveland 
administration. From 1890 to 1900 he conducted a harness shop, and 
then was engaged in a fire insurance business. For ten years he was 
on the board of review, from 1907 to 1917, and he has filled all of the 
local offices, although a Democrat and living in a strong Republican 
township, which speaks very well for his personal popularity. For 
twenty years he has been township clerk, and police magistrate, and 
has served as member and president of the village board, is now its 
clerk, and is one of the best known men in the country. When his 
father died, Mr Bower inherited the old home farm of 411 acres, three 
miles east of Richmond, and since it has come into his efficient hands, 
he has made many improvements, including the remodeling of the 
buildings, the erection of two silos and the installation of everything 
to put the farm in fine shape. Dairying is the principal feature, and 
from forty to fifty cows are kept. Mr. Bower has a tenant operating 
his farm on shares. 

So well known is Mr. Bower as a man of the utmost probity, that 
he has oftentimes been called upon to act as administrator of estates, 
conservator of properties and guardian of orphans. A Mason, he 
belongs to Calvary Commandery, K. T., and visits the national conclaves, 
and also belongs to the Eastern Star, of which Mrs. Bower was worthy 
matron at the time of her demise, May 12, 1908. 

In September, 1880, Mr. Bower was married to Mary Ella Potter, 
and they had one son, Earl E., who is connected with the National 
City Bond House of New York, with headquarters at Omaha, Ncbr., 
spent nineteen years in the Woodstock Bank, and was cashier for six- 
teen years, being at that time regarded as one of the most efficient 
financiers of the country. Mr. Bower has a pleasant home at Richmond, 
which was the girlhood residence of his wife. A public-spirited man, 
Mr. Bower has given his services to the school board since 1890, and 
can be counted upon to protect the interests of the children, providing 
for them suitable surroundings and efficient teachers. It would be 
difficult to find a more thoroughly representative man than Mr. Bower, 
who in every capacity measures up to the highest standards of American 
citizenship. 



494 HISTORY OF McHENEY COUNTY 

DANIEL B. BOYLE. 

Daniel B. Boyle, general manager and junior member of the well 
known firm of Shurtlett & Peters Company, dealers in grain, coal and 
lumber, is one of the progressive business men of Marengo, as well as 
of McHenry County. He was born at Marengo, November 29, 1877, 
one of the nine children of his parents, Daniel and Mary (Tracy) Boyle. 
Daniel Boyle. St., was born in Ireland in 1836, but came to the United 
States in the early sixties, and locating at Marengo, here rounded out 
his useful life. His wife died in 1888. 

Daniel B. Boyle attended the common and high schools of his native 
place, and commenced his business career in 1903 with Redpath & 
Compan3% grain dealers, continuing with them until the business was 
sold in 1907, at which time he formed his present partnership. Mr. 
Boyle has six persons under his supervision, and the business shows a 
healthy annual increase. 

In 1906 Mr. Boyle was united in marriage with Miss Fiances M. 
Redpath, a daughter of David Redpath, and a member of one of the 
prominent families of McHenry County. Mr. and Mrs. Boyle have 
two children, namely: Margaret L., who was born in 1908; and Lindsey 
B., who was born in January, 1910. Mr. Boyle is a consistent member 
of the Roman Catholic church. The business acumen of Mr. Boyle is 
shown in his management of his concern, and his upright policies have 
won for it a patronage that is gratifying and profitable. 



GILBERT BRAINARD. 



Gilbert Brainard, now deceased, was formerly one of the leading 
agriculturalists of McHenry County, but lived at Harvard for several 
years prior to his death which occurred in December, 1911, when he 
was fifty-four years old. He was married at Lawrence, 111., to Emma 
Brown, who was born on a farm near Lawrence, to which her father 
had come from one of the eastern states. The homestead of Gilbert 
Brainard which is well improved, comprised 300 acres, he having de- 
veloped the property, but the house now standing has been built since 
his death. Mr. Brainard specialized on raising cucumbers for sale to 
pickling factories. For some years he was connected with the McHenry 
County Fair Association, served on the school board for years, and was 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 495 

a very public-spirited man. His political convictions made him a 
Republican. The Methodist Episcopal church had in him an earnest 
member, and he was one of the original class at Lawrence, that later 
founded the church at Harvard, and Mr. Brainard was a class leader 
of the latter for several years. Mrs. Brainard died a year before him. 
They had the following children: Charles Gilbert and Susie May, who 
died young; Emma, who owns the old homestead, and built the residence 
at Harvard she now occupies, is very active in community work; Charles 
Gilbert, who lives at Round Lake; and Susie May, who lives at home, 
is a teacher at Woodstock. 



CHARLES L- BRATZLER. 

Charles L. Bratzler owns and operates 160 acres of valuable land in 
Algonquin Township, where he is engaged in breeding pure-bred cattle, 
is a resident of Algonquin, and serving as assistant supervisor of his 
township. He is also secretary for R. E. Haeger, widely known as a 
cattle man. Mr. Bratzler was born in Algonquin Township, November 
19, 1889, a son of J. C. and Eva M. (Jayne) Bratzler, who had four 
children. J. C. Bratzler was extensively engaged in farming in Algon- 
quin Township, where he died in 1902. 

Charles L. Bratzler attended the common and high schools of Algon- 
quin, and his first business experience was with a bank. In 1909 he 
became secretary of R. E. Haeger, which position he still retains. That 
same year he was made assistant supervisor of Algonquin Township, 
and is still representing his township on the county board. In politics 
he is a stanch Republican, and one of the leaders of his party in this 
part of the county. 

On July 15, 1915, Mr. Bratzler was united in marriage with Miss 
Susie M. Binnie, a daughter of Alexander Binnie, and a member of one 
of the pioneer families of Kane County. His fraternal affiliations are 
with the Masons and Elks. Mr. Bratzler has long been connected 
with the breeding of pure-bred Holstein cattle, and his success in this 
line has made his name a well known one among cattlemen. 



MARTIN C. BREMER. 



Martin C. Bremer, now living retired at Marengo, is one of the 
highly respected men of McHenry County, who is entitled to the regard 



496 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

of his fellow citizens. He was Ikimi ai Elk Grove, Cook County, III.. 
May A, lstio. a son of Henry and Dorthea (Steege) Bremer. Henry 
Bremer was born in Germany, ami when eighteen years old he came in 
the United States, ami became a fanner in Cook County, 111., where 
the mother died when her son, Martin, was ten years old. Henry Bremer 
was married (second) to Sophie Hawaiian, who survives him, and lives 
at Marengo. In 1882 Henry Bremer came to McHenry County, locat- 
ing on a farm four miles northwest of Marengo, a portion of which is 
still owned by Martin Bremer, and the other pari by his brother Henry. 

When he was twenty-eight years old Martin Bremer was married 
to Dorothea Schroder of Huntley, who died two and one-half years 
later, leaving him with the following children: Fred, who married Ethel 
Beardsley, lives at Marengo: and his three children, Ethel, Ralph and 
Jean; Amanda, who married George Rappich; has a daughter, Adeline, 
and lives at Marengo; and Herman, who married Elizabeth Husfeldt. 
was in the service during the World war, is now at home witli his father, 
and lives on the home farm. On June 10, 1918, Mr. Bremer was mar- 
ried (second) to Mrs. Louisa (Stumme) Strubing, also born at Elk 
Grove, 111., but married at Elgin, 111., where her first husband Mr. 
Strubing, had been a merchant. By her first marriage Mrs. Bremer 
had two daughters, namely: Loretta and Ruth Strubing, both of whom 
live at Elgin. There are no children of Mr. Bremer's second marriage. 
The Lutheran Church of Marengo has in Mr. and Mrs. Bremer faithful 
members and he is a trustee. 

After some years devoted to the operation of his farm, Mr. Bremer 
retired, ami now makes his home at Marengo, where he finds congenial 
surroundings. He has been in past years a hard worker, ami knowing 
how to save his money and invest it, he can now enjoy the comforts of 
life without undue exertion. 



WHITNEY BRIGHAM. 



Whitney Brigham, one of the prosperous farmers of Hebron Town- 
ship, lives two miles west of Hebron, and was born on his present farm, 
February 9, 1878, a son of Charles Morris Brigham. The father was 
also born on this farm, August 7, 1845, and died July 19, 1894. The 
grandparents of Whitney Brigham, Whitney and Mary (Colson) Brig- 
ham natives of Vermont, on September (i, 1839 entered 120 acres of 



HISTORY OF MeHENRY COUNTY 497 

land in Hebron Township, long before the railroad was built or there 
were improvements in the county. 

Charles Morris Brigham was married when twenty-five years of 
age to Fanny Campbell, a native of Vermont, who was brought to 
Illinois when she was two years old, and she survives her husband and 
makes her home at Hebron. They had the following children: Bertha 
B., who is the widow of Mark Stone, lives at Richmond; Florence, who 
lives with her mother at Hebron; Grace M., who married Edgar Swan, 
lives at Liberty ville, 111.; and Whitney, whose name heads this review. 

Whitney Brigham has spent his life upon his present farm. He was 
married February 20, 1901 to Clara Tribbey, born at Janesville, Wis., 
a daughter of Erastus and Jane (Shirley) Tribbey, natives of Vermont 
and Germany, respectively, who came to McHenry County shortly 
prior to Mrs. Brigham's marriage. Mr. Tribbey died October 5, 1918, 
at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Brigham. Mr. and Mrs. Brigham 
have four children, namely: Shirley, Joyce, Libbey Jean and Beulah 
Belle. 

Mr. Brigham has 240 acres in his farm where he carries on dairy- 
ing with fifty cows. His house was erected by his grandfather, but 
later was rebuilt. He has two cement silos, one 14 x 40 and the other 
18 x 44 feet. Mrs. Brigham belongs to the Baptist church, but her 
husband is not connected with any religious organization. Fraternally 
he is a Woodman. 



SAMUEL RIGHT BROWN. 

Samuel Right Brown, now deceased, was born at Bedford, Mass., 
November 17, 1817, and he died at Cary, 111., February 2, 1908, having 
lived in retirement in that village for some seventeen years prior to his 
demise. He was married at Bath, N. Y., to Sallie Ann Cass, born 
June 3, 1817, at Bath, N. Y. After his marriage he came to Kankakee, 
111., where a brother, Darien E. Brown had already located, and about 
two years later, Samuel R. Brown came to McHenry County, to join 
Mrs. Brown's two sisters, Lucy, who was Mrs. A. L. Weaver; and 
Matilda, who was Mrs. David Miller, both of Algonquin Township, 
where their husbands had secured land from the government. Samuel 
R. Brown rented the farm he later bought, on which was an old house. 
It was partly covered with timber. He cleared off the land, drained 



!!'> HISTORY OF McHBNRT COUNTY 

it ami put up a good set of buildings, to which a silu and other improve- 
ments have since been added. For years Mr. Brown made butter for 
private customers in addition to carrying on his farmings, becoming 

one of the well known men of his community. On December 3, 1902, 
Mr. Brown had the misfortune to lose his wife. They were the parents 
of the following children: William C, who enlisted when only sixteen 
years old in Company I. Ninety-fifth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, under 
( 'aptain .lames Xish, and he served through the Civil War, coming out of 
the conflict without any wounds but with his health so impaired that he 
died fifteen years later; Samuel K.. who is a well-known stockman, lives 
at Cary with his sister; Martha, who is the widow of Mark Osgood, 
also lives at Cary: Charlotte, who died at the age of eighteen years, 
had attended the academy at Elgin; Julia, who lives at Cary, is a very 
progressive lady, who during the World War was active in Red Cross 
work, and belongs to the Woman's Club, Royal Neighbors and Ladies' 
Aid Society: Darwin, who is a prominent man and successful farmer of 
Lake County, 111.; Melvin, who is deceased, was a prominent cement 
contractor, and passed away at Wancenda, 111., in 1913; Daniel M., was 
a milk dealer of Chicago for some years, was educated in the Elgin 
Academy; and Dora, who married Ben Rand of Crystal Lake, died when 
about fifty years of age. The Brown family is one of the best-known 
ones in McHenry County, and its members during their long residence 
here have been connected with some of the most constructive work (if 
their section, and are recognized as being typical of the advanced spirit 
which seems to prevail in this portion of Illinois. 



ARCHIE H. BROTZMAN. 

The star on the service flag in the home of Arthur II. Brotzman has 
turned to gold; there is a vacant chair in the family circle; aching hearts 
seek solace for the supreme sacrifice which took from a useful, happy 
life one of McHenry County's most promising young men, Horace A. 
Brotzman. The great patriotism of this family has been called upon 
more heavily than that of any other at Marengo, and its members can 
only be consoled by the remembrance of the fact that their gallant young 
soldier died in defense of what all of them believed to he right and good, 
and that he did not try to shirk his duty, but met the requirements of 
Vnerican manhood as a good citizen should. 




^c«^ ^to^ r ^L 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 499 

Arthur H. Brotzman, fn. mili nrly called "Archie," is now living retired 
a1 Marengo, but he was formerly engaged in farming. He was born a1 
Huntley, this county, April 22, 1869, a son of John Brotzman, a native 
of Ohio, who spent his boyhood in Madison County, that state, to which 
his father, John, had come from Pennsylvania in an early day. In 
1859 John Brotzman, the younger, came to Illinois, his brother, Naliuin, 
who still resides in Riley Township, coming later. Nahum Brotzman 
was a loyal soldier during the Civil War, and has been an able official of 
Riley Township, serving it as supervisor for the past thirty years. There 
is no more true blue American in the township than he. His son, Earl 
Brotzman, is well known at the Chicago Stock Yards, having been for 
the past quarter of a century connected with the commission firm of 
Miller, White and Wood. 

Upon his arrival in McHenry County, John Brotzman settled at 
Huntley on a farm. Like his brother he served his country during the 
Civil War, enlisting in the Fifty-second Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and 
served for three years and three days, or until peace was declared. 
Although not wounded, a horse was shot under him. Returning to 
McHenry County he resumed his farming. Soon after the close of the 
war he was married to Libbic Melvin, who came from Michigan to 
McHenry County as a teacher in Riley Township and Coral Township, 
and was engaged in educational work for several years. After their 
marriage Mr, and Mrs. Brotzman located on the farm near Huntley, 
now owned by Archie H. Brotzman. In the spring of 1870 John 
Brotzman bought the farm in Riley Township, four and one-half miles 
south of Marengo, where he died November 7, 1918, aged eighty-four 
years, having been born February 15, 1834. His wife died in the 
seventies, when twenty-seven years old, leaving two children, namely: 
Libbie, who is Mrs. William Weaver, lives on the old homestead, and 
Archie H. Brotzman. This farm was a run-down one of 120 acres, 
which he put in good shape, adding to it until there were 1823-ii acres in 
it. On it he erected a fine set of buildings so that it is a valuable prop- 
erty. John Brotzman served for thirty years as township clerk, and for 
twenty-five years as assessor, being in both offices continuously. He 
was a Republican, and very active in local affairs. An excellent judge 
of horses, as well as a lover of them, John Brotzman became well known 
at exhibits of driving horses, and did a good business in matching teams 
and selling them. He always drove a good grade of horse himself, and 
was a magnificent driver. 

Archie H. Brotzman remained at home and attended the local schools 



.".(in BISTORT OF McHENRY COUNTY 

When 1h^ was twenty-four years old ho was married to Sadie fiance, a 
daughter of Charles and Eveline (Frayer) [lance, the latter now a 
resident of Marengo. Mr. I lance was a carpenter and building con- 
tractor, who died May 30, 1007. After his marriage A. II. Brotzman 
boughl a farm two miles from the old farm, Imt sold it eight years later, 
and rented land for a time. He then boughl another farm of forty 
acres. About 101(> he moved to Marengo. He has always been inter- 
ested in handling stock, and ships to the Chicago market. He has also 
handled milk cows for the dairymen's trade, and has been interested in 
other branches of the agricultural industry. He is a member of the 
Mystic Workers. 

Mr. and Mrs. Brotzman have had the following children horn to 
them: John, who was sent overseas from Camp Tremont, August 26, 
1917, was in Siberia for some months as a soldier of the National Army; 
Horace, who was in the coast artillery, enlisted May 12, 1918, and June 
28, 1918, died at Fort Weatherill on Narragansett Bay as a result of an 
accident, when only twenty-one years of age; Eloise, who is in the office 
of the Ellison Machine Company; Florence, who was graduated from 
the Marengo High School in 1919; and Clifford, who is at Woodstock. 
The death of Horace Brotzman was a heavy blow not only to his im- 
mediate family but to the community where he had been reared, and 
where he was known as a bright, clean, ambitious young man, whom it 
was fell was destined for a happy and successful future. War exacts a 
heavy price, and the family and friends of this young soldier are [laying 
it in losing him from their midst, and his community suffers because he 
was not spared for constructive work in its behalf. 



SAMUEL W. BROWX. 



Samuel \Y. Brown, postmaster of Ringwood, and owner of one of the 
leading drug stores of McHenry Township, is one of the best known men 
of this section of McHenry County. He was born in McHenry County 
August 23, 1880, one of the two children of his parents, Jonathan E. and 
Emma (Rugg) Brown, the former of whom was born in New Hampshire, 
but came to McHenry County in an early day, locating at Hebron in 
1S49, but later moving to Ringwood. where he died in 1914. His widow 
survives him. 

Samuel W. Brown attended the grammar and high schools of 



HISTORY OF McIIENRY COUNTY 501 

McHenry County, the Elgin Academy and a business college, from 
which he was graduated in 1896. He then took a course in pharmacy 
at the Northwestern University, and following his graduation, embarked 
in his present business. He handles a complete line of drugs, paints, 
oils, wall paper, school books, stationery, and similar commodities, his 
stock being valued at $5,000. A staunch Republican, he was appointed 
postmaster November 24, 1904, by President Roosevelt, and so capable 
has he proven himself that he has since been continued in office by the 
successive presidents. 

On September 12, 1906, Mr. Brown was married to Miss Lora 
McDonnell, a daughter of James McDonnell, a veteran of the Civil 
War, and a prominent resident of McHenry County. Mr. and Mrs. 
Brown have a son, Leonard J., who was born September 13, 1914. Mr. 
Brown is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and Mrs. Brown 
belongs to the Catholic church. His fraternal affiliations are with the 
Masons and Woodmen of America, and he is as popular in these orders 
as he is with the community at large. 



THERON HOMER BROWN. 

Theron Homer Brown, police magistrate of Woodstock, and one of 
the solid and representative men of McHenry County, enjoys the esteem 
of all with whom he is brought into contact on account of his fair and 
impartial methods of dispensing justice. He was born in New York, 
October 13, 1857, one of the four children of his parents, Alexander A. 
and Anna G. (Tucker) Brown, the former of whom was a prosperous 
farmer of New York state. 

Theron Homer Brown was reared in his native state, where he 
attended the public schools. Until 1901, he was engaged in farming, 
but in that year he came to Woodstock and embarked in an insurance 
business. For eight consecutive years he served McHenry County as 
superintendent of the poor farm, leaving that position to accept that 
of police magistrate when he was elected as such in 1910. So capable 
did he prove, that he was re-elected on his record, in 1914, and is still 
serving. 

Mr. Brown was married to Miss Rosa A. Thompson, a daughter of 
Edward Thompson, and they had a son, Volney E., who is at home. 
The first Mrs. Brown died October 1, 1916. On July 29, 1918, Mr. 



502 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

Brown married her sister, Mrs. Minnie Fuller, of Indianapolis, Ind. 
Mr. Brown and his family belong to the Methodist Episcopal church of 
Woodstock. He is a member of the Blue Lodge, Chapter and Com- 
mandery of the Masonic fraternity, and of the Modern Woodmen of 
America, serving the last named order as clerk. So uniformly just are 
the decisions of Magistrate Brown that very few of them are reversed 
by I hi' higher courts, and his record is one of which anyone in a similar 
office might well he proud. 



WILLIAM BRUEDIGAN. 

William Bruedigan is a man who is successfully carrying on a business 
established by his father, and giving the community of Crystal Lake 
excellent service as a machinist and expert blacksmith. He was born 
at Crystal Lake, 111., July 18, 1883, and is one of the four children of 
his parents, Henry and Augusta (Kollankork) Bruedigan, natives of 
Germany, who came to the LTnited States at an early day. They located 
at Crystal Lake, and here Henry Bruedigan established his son's present 
business, continuing his interest in it until his retirement in 1914. 
Although now living in retirement from the cares of business, he takes 
an intelligent interest in local affairs, and is a very desirable citizen. 

William Bruedigan was reared at Crystal Lake, and attended its 
grammar schools, and was taught his trades by his father, early gaining 
a practical knowledge of life and its requirements. His father took 
him into the business twenty years ago, and when he retired, the son 
became the sole owner, operating as Bruedigan & Co. In November 10, 
1910, William Bruedigan was married to Miss Rose Miller. Mr. Bruedi- 
gan is a Republican. He and his wife belong to the Lutheran church. 
A young man of industrious habits, he has increased his trade, and 
firmly established himself in the confidence and respect of his com- 
munity. 



JOHN Bl'CHTK. 



John Buchte, mayor of Union, and general superintendent of Libby, 
McNeill & Libby's establishment at this city, is one of the leading men 
of his part of the county, and deserves the prosperity which has attended 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 503 

liis career. He was born February 15, 1883, one of the ten children of 
Conrad and Caroline (Hemming) Buchte. Conrad Buchte was engaged 
in farming for a number of years and after having secured a comfortable 
fortune, retired, and is spending his declining years in ease. 

John Buchte attended the common and high schools of his neighbor- 
hood, and gained a practical knowledge of farming from his father. 
His first business venture was in a mercantile line, and he continued 
in it until he was offered his present position, when he was twenty-six 
years old. This involves heavy responsibilities, but he has proven 
himself capable of meeting them, and manages his fifty employes effi- 
ciently. A Mason, he belongs to Oriental Lodge No. 358, A. F. & A. 
M. of Union, and he also belongs to the Eastern Star. In politics he is 
a Republican. A man of unusual business ability, his worth is appre- 
ciated by all who know him. 



JOHN V. BUCKLAND. 



John V. Buckland, proprietor of the Ringwood Nursery, is one of 
the best known men in his line in this part of the state, and enjoys a 
patronage which extends over a wide territory. He was born at Green 
Lake, Wis., August 9, 1859, a son of Romulus A. and Laura E. (Smith) 
Buckland. 

Romulus A. Buckland was a native of Brandon, Vt., where he 
received his education. He came west in 1849, and stopped at Dundee, 
111. The following year he was engaged with a party of engineers to 
survey and locate the railroad from Elgin to Richmond, with head- 
quarters at McHenry. There he made the acquaintance of Laura E. 
Smith. After their marriage they lived for some time at Smith's 
Corners, then moved to Rochester, Wis., but finally located at Green 
Lake, Wis., where he was engaged in farming in connection with his 
brother until 1865, when he concluded to change his occupation, on 
account of failing health. They returned to Ringwood, lived about a 
year at Smith's Corners, and in 1867 he located and built a cheese 
factory and dwelling at Ringwood, and moved his family there in 
December of that year. In the spring of 1869, Mrs. Buckland's health 
began to fail rapidly. She died June 22, 1869, and was buried in Ring- 
wood Cemetery. She left four children, namely: Moseley A., who was 
named for his old railroad companion; John Y., whose name heads this 



504 



HlsTOKY OF McHENRY COUNTY 



review; Clara E. and Howard A. Romulus A. Buckland was married 
(second) to Harriel A. Pike, a Dative of New Hampshire, who came to 
Ringwood as a teacher. She had entered the educational field in the 
south as an instructor of colored children after the close of the Civil war. 
She joined relatives at Ringwood after her experiences in the south, and 
was engaged to teach the Ladd School at Ladd's Corners, and later 
taught at Greenwood and Woodstock, returning to Ladd's Corners 
where she was married Augusl 8, 1S70. 

R. A. Buckland died August 8, 1885, after many years of failing 
health. In 1895 .1. V. Buckland erected a new residence and remodeled 
t ho factory building into a barn. 

Harriet A. Buckland died October 31, 1918, and was buried in Ring- 
wood Cemetery. 

John V. Buckland has operated both the farm and nursery and 
has been a very busy man. He has ten acres devoted to nursery stock, 
and also grows fruits, supplying a general line of trees, shrubs, and 
plants to the local trade, although he has an excellent patronage from 
the proprietors of summer resorts who desire to beautify their places 
with his landscape stock. He has studied landscape gardening, and is 
often called upon to assist in planning for this class of work. Mr. 
Buckland keeps a few high-grade Jersey cows and Barred Plymouth 
Rock chickens. He is not married, his step-mother managing his house- 
hold. Fraternally Mr. Buckland is a Mason and Woodman. He has 
never aspired to public life, his time and attention being fully occupied 
with his varied duties. 



BILLINGS BURTON. 



Billings Burton, now deceased, was a retired farmer of Harvard, 
and one of the most highly esteemed men of the county, who richly 
deserved the confidence of his fellow citizens. He was born at Cana- 
joharie, Montgomery County, N. Y., April 26, 1821. In the fall of 
1841, he came to Illinois, landing at Southport, now Kenosha, and 
walked the remaining forty-four miles to Harvard. After looking about 
him, he selected what is now Chemung Township, and entered govern- 
ment land six miles northwest of Harvard. 

In 1844, Billings Burton was married to Harriet J. Sweasey, who 
came from Springfield, Otsego County, X. Y., to Illinois, with her 



HISTORY OF McIIENRY COUNTY 505 

parents in the early forties. She was born October 22, 1828, and died 
May 13, 1910. In 1901 Billings Burton sold his farm, which is how 
owned by Blake Bell, and moved to Sharon, but later settled at Har- 
vard, where he rounded ovit his long and useful life, passing away in his 
eighty-sixth year. Few men are permitted to see so many radical 
changes as did Mr. Billings Burton. When he arrived in McHenrv 
County almost the entire region was either prairie land with unturned 
sod, or densely timbered sections, and all of the present development 
has in large part been accomplished since he, as a young man, walked 
that forty-four miles between Kenosha and Harvard. He was a man 
of sound judgment and broad outlook, and while of course he could 
not have foreseen what was going to happen in its entirety, still he did 
have faith enough in the future of McHenrv County to decide to spend 
in it the best years of his life. That he succeeded admirably in develop- 
ing a valuable property, and establishing here a family that has gained 
distinction, shows that he knew what he was doing when he readied 
that decision. 

Billings Burton has passed from his old life, but he has left to repre- 
sent him and his good wife twenty-eight grand-children, eighteen great- 
grand-children, his brother, Charles Burton of Sharon, in addition to his 
eleven children, who are as follows: James 0., who lives in LeRoy 
Township; Orrin, who lives at Sharon, 111.; Menzo, who lives in Che- 
mung Township; Mrs. Sarah Corkins, who lives at Peabody, Kans.; 
Mrs. Mahala Piper, who lives at Sharon, 111.; Mrs. Joe Englehardt, who 
lives at Sharon; Mrs. L. Kizer, Mrs. J. B. Englehardt, Mrs. Horton 
Gillis and Mrs. Clara Spicer, the last four living at Harvard; and Mrs. 
Charles Quackenbush, who lives near the old Burton homestead in 
Chemung Township. His daughter, Mrs. George Little, and his sisters, 
Mrs. Mercy Burr and Mrs. Elizabeth Hollester, died subsequent to 
his demise. 



MENZO E. BURTON. 



Menzo E. Burton, whose finely developed farm is located on section 
G, Chemung Township, lives on the old Merriam farm of 150 acres, of 
which sixty acres are in Boone County. He was born on the old Burton 
farm, May 19, 1871, and was the youngest son of the family of Billings 
Burton, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work. He left 
home when twelve years old and has earned his own way ever since. 



506 HISTORY OP M< IIKXIJY COUNTY 

Learning the buttermaking trade, lie was engaged in ii in Wisconsin, 
Illinois. Iowa, Ohio, Oklahoma. Texas, Colorado and Missouri, and 
assisted in establishing a number of creameries in these different states. 
It was his custom to erect the building, install the machinery and lien 
educate someone to take charge, after which he would go on to another 
community. Oftentimes, however, he was called backbyurgenl appeals 
of the stockholders who wished to have his expert knowledge and 
experience to guide their enterprise. Still later he covered North 
Dakota, Minnesota and other western states, twenty-two in all, and in 
each state established creameries at various producing centers, the 
majority of which are still in operation. Mr. Burton was thus occupied 
for about twenty years of his life. 

He had been married at the age of twenty-one years at Williams Bay, 
Wisconsin, to Lottie Green, and she died six and one-half years later. 
He was married (second) to Hattie L. Merriam, a daughter of Hamilton 
and Mary Merriam, who owned the present farm of Mr. and Mrs. 
Burton, to which she was brought from Linn, Wisconsin, when five years 
old. Mrs. Burton's parents died in Sharon, firm in the faith of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. At their death, Mr. Burton bought the 
Merriam farm, and has made many changes upon it. This farm was 
entered from the government by a Mr. Bird, and he built the first 
house, but it was destroyed by fire in 1914, and in 191S Mr. Burton 
replaced it with a fine modern structure. He has added twenty-two 
acres across the railroad, so that there are now 150 acres in the 
farm, the greater part of which is cultivated. Here Mr. Burton carries 
on grain and stock farming with a gratifying success. 

Mr. Burton was called upon to make the supreme sacrifice as his 
eldest son, the gallant young soldier Serg. Burnice Burton, was killed in 
action during the first big drive on Verdun, October 16, 1916. He 
enlisted at Panama in the English Aviation Service, going there from 
Virginia where he was operating a creamery, at the outbreak of the 
World War. He left a widow, whose maiden name was Helen CTaypool, 
whom he had married in Oklahoma, and two sons, Bernard and Theodore. 
Serg. Burton was an experienced flyer and had been at the front some 
time. His family received a characteristically cheery letter from him 
just a week before he was killed. Like so many heroes of that mighty 
conflict, he was very young, only twenty-three when stricken from the 
rolls of life. All that is mortal of this young man who loved humanity 
better than he did his own safety, is buried near Verdun, and his grave 
is properly indicated and marked. By his second marriage, Menzo E. 





<A /U^c^f* 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 507 

Burton has the following children: Paul Everett, who is a graduate of 
the Sharon High School; Victor Carroll and Donald M., who are attend- 
ing the Sharon High School; and Bessie Louise, who is the youngest. 
All of these children are living at home. 

The father of Mrs. Burton, the late Hamilton Merriam, was born 
near Syracuse, N. Y., May 23, 1832, and he died at Sharon May 23, 1901, 
on his sixty-ninth birthday, where he was living retired. As a child he 
was taken by his parents, Allen and Permelia Merriam, to Walworth 
County, Wis. They were natives of New York, who died near Linn, 
Wis. Hamilton Merriam was married in 1800 to Mary Brown, also 
born in New York, who came to Wisconsin when eighteen years old. 
Until her marriage she was a school teacher. In 1881 Mr. and Mrs. 
Merriam came to McHenry County and bought the Henry Bird place, 
two miles east of Sharon. Mr. Bird lived on his farm until he retired 
and went to Sharon where he died at an advanced age. Mr. and Mrs. 
Merriam had the following family: Permelia Belle, who is Mrs. Duncan 
Stevenson of Madison, Wis.; George, who lives near Palmyra, Wis.; 
Wallace, who lives near Darius, Wis.; Orrin, who lives on a part of the 
Merriam farm; Hattie, who is Mrs. Burton; and Fred, who lives at 
Janesville, Wis. 

The Burton family is another of the highly respected ones of McHenry 
County that is connected by intermarriage with a number of others that 
belong in the best class of those who aided so materially in the settlement 
and development of this important section of the state. Mr. Burton 
and his wife are potent factors in the neighborhood, and their children 
are bright young people who give promise of becoming useful and enter- 
prising citizens. 



D. C. BUSH. 
Page 132. 

JOHN CAREY. 



John Carey, a prominent man and retired farmer of McHenry, at 
one time owned and operated one of the largest farms in McHenry 
County, but since 1915 has lived at ease, having fairly earned the right 



508 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

to do so by long years of arduous labor in tilling the soil. He was born 

in Lake Comity, 111.. July 1.5, 1853, and has been a resident of McHenry 
County since 1S57, at which time his parents, John and Mary (Dorev 
Carey, came here. The father. John Carey, was horn in Ireland, hut 
came to the United States in 1848, and first settled in Lake County. 
111. His life was spent in farming, and he owned and operated a large 
amount of land. His death occurred in McHenry County in 1897. 
lie and his wife had five children. 

John Carey, the younger, attended the schools of McHenry County, 
and was reared on his father's farm. All of his efforts were directed 
towards farming, and he still owns 400 acres of very valuable McHenry 
County farm land. He married Miss Mary Phalen, a daughter of 
Thomas Phalen. They became the parents of eight children, of whom 
six survive. The family all belong to the Catholic Church. In politics 
Mr. Carey is a Democrat. During his entire life, Mr. Carey has been 
deeply interested in local improvements, and with the entry of this 
country into the World War, he proved his loyalty and public spirit in 
many ways. 



MERVILLE A. CARMACK. 

Merville A. Carrnack, one of the leading lawyers practicing at the 
McHenry County bar, has long been a resident of Woodstock, and one 
of its representative men. He was born in Dunham Township, this 
county, August 23, 1872, a son of Abraham and Caroline C. (Niewerth 
( armack. Abraham Carrnack was twice married and had seven children. 
He was born in Crawford County, Pa., and when he attained to his 
majority he came west to Illinois, settling in McHenry County, where he 
was engaged in farming. This county remained his home until his 
death, which occurred February 17, 1892. His wife died several days 
before him, passing away on February 11, of that same year. 

Merville A. Carrnack attended the district schools of his native town- 
ship, Harvard High School and other preparatory schools, and when 
he attained to manhood, he began reading law under Hon. O. H. Gill- 
more, being admitted to the bar in 1901, and immediately thereafter 
began to practice his profession. Since then, he has been connected 
with some very important jurisprudence, and has built up an enduring 
reputation for knowledge of the law, and skilful handling of cases. 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 509 

In 1906 Mr. Carmack was married to Miss Belle G. Allen, a daughter 
of E. W. Allen, and a member of one of the old established families of 
McHenry County. Mr. and Mrs. Carmack have three children, 
namely: Klaron M., M. Allan, and Carrol. Their residence is at No. 
377 Lincoln Avenue, Woodstock. Mr. Carmack's political opinions 
make him a Republican of the progressive type. He is a Mason in good 
standing. 



CHARLES D. CARPENTER. 

Charles D. Carpenter, now living retired at Marengo, is one of the 
highly respected men of McHenry County, where he has passed the 
greater part of his life. He was born in Delaware County, N. Y., 
October 2, 1848, a son of Chester L. and Olive M. (Bloom) Carpenter, 
natives of New York and Pennsylvania, respectively. In 1849 he came 
with his parents to Illinois, his father locating on a farm ten miles south- 
east of Beloit, Wis., where the family resided until 1855, when they 
moved to McHenry County, purchasing a farm on the Kishwaukee 
River Road, two and one-half miles from Marengo. Here the family 
home was made for many years. 

On February 22, 1871, occurred the marriage of Charles D. Carpenter 
and Luzena Joslyn, who was born in Seneca Township, this county, 
August 13, 1851. At the time of his marriage, Mr. Carpenter moved 
on to a farm in Boone County, ten miles northeast of Belvidere, where 
he and his wife resided for twenty-three years. In 1894 they removed 
to Marengo, where for several years he was engaged in the stock business, 
handling principally cattle and horses, which he purchased from local 
breeders and shipped to Chicago. He is a director of the Dairymen's 
State Bank of Marengo, and has held this office for several years. While 
a Republican, he has kept out of politics. The Methodist Episcopal 
church holds his membership as it does that of his wife, both being 
regular attendants at its services. When the church and parsonage 
was erected, he served on the building committee, and has been a 
member of the board of trustees of the church for over twenty-five 
years. He is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, and the 
Mystic Workers. He and his wife have two daughters, namely: Mary, 
who married E. R. Hyndman, proprietor of a garage at Capron, 111., 
and Ruby, who is the wife of G. F. Colver, a farmer residing near 
Marengo. 



510 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

JAMES F. CASEY. 

James F. Casey, one of the leading attorneys practicing at the bar 
of Woodstock) is one of the besl examples of i lie self-made men furnished 
by McHenry County. Be was born ai Huntley, 111.. March li. 1863. 
a son of Daniel and Nancy Byron (Fitzgerald) Casey, and grandson of 

Daniel Casey. The elder Daniel Casey was horn in County Limerick, 
Ireland. He grew up in his native land, was there married, and located 
on a small farm, hut during the terrible famine of 1847, he brought his 
family to the United States, settling in Virginia, where he died. His 
children were as follows: Robert, Daniel, Jr., Michael and Mary. 

Daniel Casey. Jr., the father of James F. Casey, was about thirteen 
years old when the family emigrated to the United States, and after 
his arrival in this country, attended the common schools, and later 
became a farmer. At an early age, he was married at Boston. Mass., 
his wife also being a native of County Limerick, Ireland, and a daughter 
of Garrett Fitzgerald, a man of superior education, who had been a 
teacher in Ireland, which lie left in 1S4S, locating first at Boston. Mass., 
hut leaving that city two years later for Chicago, where he died when 
between eighty and ninety years old. The children of Garrett Fitzgerald 
were as follows: James, Garrett, Mary, Kate, Eliza and Nancy. The 
eldest son, James, who was a promising young lawyer of Chicago, at 
tin' beginning of the Civil war, enlisted and became captain of Company 
I, Twenty-third Illinois Volunteer Infantry, Col. James A. Mulligan 
commanding, what was popularly known as the famous "Irish Brigade." 
and participated in many hard-fought battles. Captain Fitzgerald 
was a zealous member of the Fenian organization. The daughter, Eliza, 
was married, and at an early day moved to Kansas, where she was 
massacred at the time of the Quantrell raid against Lawrence in that 
state. Shortly after his marriage, Daniel Casey, Jr., and his wife came 
to Chicago, where they lived for about four years, but in 1851 moved 
to McHenry County, settling near Huntley, where Mr. Casey bought 
land and began improving a farm. He died March 3, 1863, of typhoid 
fever, when he was about forty years of age. Mrs. ( !asey survived him 
many years, dying at the age of seventy-six. She was a very devout 
Christian, and during her life was the correspondent of some of the 
dignitaries of the Catholic church, among them Bishop Foley and 
Father Daman of Chicago. She received many personal letters from the 
Pope of Rome. She was a faithful mother, and after the death of her 
husband, maintained a good home for her children, early instilling into 



HISTORY OF McHEXRY COUNTY 511 

their minds the precepts of virtue and right living. Self-sacrificing to a 
remarkable degree, she labored with untiring zeal to bring up and educate 
her family that they might occupy good positions in life. 

James F. Casey was only three days old when his father died, and 
he was reared at Huntley by his mother, and to her early training he 
owes his perception of the underlying principles of character on which 
his success in life has been founded. He was kept at a good school 
regularly until he was about thirteen years old, when he found employ- 
ment at farm work, his first duty as a boy being the watching of sheep, 
for which he received $2 per month. Later when he was able to handle 
general farm work, he received $5 per month. Still later he was ad- 
vanced until he received $11 per month. Having reached the highest 
limit in wages, as then paid, he left the farm, and going first to Huntley, 
and later to Chicago, he secured better paying employment. All this 
time he had continued his studies, and by careful economy, managed 
to save a little money, so that he was able to attend school, being grad- 
uated from the Huntley High School when sixteen years old. He then 
attended the Elgin Academy for three winters, at the same time working 
in the summers. At the age of twenty years, he received a first-class 
certificate as a teacher from the county superintendent of schools. 
In 1881, he organized a private grammar school at Elgin, and in the 
meanwhile, having been studying law, in 18S3, he entered as a student 
the law office of Judge Ranstead, a prominent attorney of Elgin, and 
after taking a course at the Union College of Law at Chicago, was 
admitted to the bar in 1887. On September 6 of that year he located 
at Woodstock, where in 18S8 he formed a partnership with Hon. M. L. 
Joslyn, which association was continued until March, 1897, when it 
was dissolved, and since then Mr. Casey has been alone. Some of the 
jurisprudence with which he has been associated includes the following 
cases: the J. G. Templeton murder case, in which he appeared for the 
defendant and secured an acquittal for his client; the case of Mrs. Woolerl 
for shooting her daughter, in which he appeared for the defense, and 
she was judged insane; the murder case of Joseph Held and Dr. Koehler, 
in which he secured acquittal for his clients; and in the case of John 
Flusky against James Clancy, Mr. Casey succeeded in saving an estate 
valued at $150,000 for the rightful owner. This case was carried to the 
Supreme Court. Politically Mr. Casey is a Republican, and has taken 
an active part on the stump in every campaign since the one in which 
James G. Blaine was a presidential candidate. Mr Casey served for 



512 HISTORY OF M< BENRY COUNTY 

one term as chairman of the McHenry County Republican Central 
( ommittee. 

t)n October 30, 1888. Mr. Casey was married to Minnie Simmons, 
a native of Woodstock, who died May 22. 1890, leaving one daughter, 
Sylvia. Mr. Casey is one of the besl known lawyers of northern Illinois, 
and enjoys a practice which is widespread and lucrative. Personally, 
he is one of the most affable of men, and his kindly manner and ready 
sympathy win him friends wherever he is known, while his professional 
ability and scholarly attainments gain for him the respect and confidence 
of his profession and community. He owns two farms of 530 aires in 
Nunda Township on Fox River. There are good buildings and good 
stock on these farms and he prides himself on his properties. 



WILLIAM J. C. CASELY, M. D. 

William J. C. Casely, M. D., one of the leading physicians and 
surgeons of Marengo, who has long been recognized as an honor to his 
profession, is connected with St. Joseph's Hospital of Elgin. He is the 
only child of his parents, William J. and Caroline (Reed) Casely, and 
he was born in Marengo Township, April 22, 1862. William J. Casely 
was horn in England, and when a mere lad he was apprenticed to the 
cabinetmaking trade, and after he had learned it, he followed it the 
remainder of his life. In young manhood he came to the United State-. 
and located at Marengo. 

Doctor Casely attended the common and high schools of Marengo, 
the University of Illinois at Champaign, 111., and was graduated from 
the Chicago Medical College in 1885. Immediately thereafter he estab- 
lished himself in a general practice at Marengo, where he has since 
resided, with the exception of ten years spent at Chicago, where he was 
appointed by Mayor Harrison, the elder, examining surgeon of the police 
department. Doctor Casely is a member of the McHenry County 
Medical Society, the Illinois Medical Society, and the American Medical 
Association. In politics, he is a Republican, but has never sought 
publicity, having preferred to give his time and attention to his profes- 
sion. Fraternally, he is a Mason. 

In 1886 Doctor Casely was married to Miss Rachel Pringle, a daughter 
of Patterson Pringle, a member of one of the pioneer families of McHenry 
County. The first Mrs. Casely died in 1900. In 1903 Doctor Casely 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 513 

was married (second) to Miss Emma C. Lane, a daughter of Frederick 
Lane, well known in McHenry County affairs. Doctor Casely has two 
children, namely: Robert E. and William E. The family belong to the 
Presbyterian church. Doctor Casely takes a deep interest in anything 
pertaining to the advancement of his community. His office and 
residence are on East Washington Street, Marengo, in the heart of the 
city, a few doors from the main street. 



PROF. JOHN W. CASTELO. 

Prof. John W. Castelo, superintendent of the Huntley school, and 
one of the eminent educators of McHenry County, is held in the highest 
esteem by all who know him. He was born at Toledo, 111., August 15, 
1S80, one of the five children of his parents, Calvin B. and Lizzie (Walker) 
( astelo. Calvin B. Castelo was a contractor and was engaged in that 
line until his death, which occurred in 1917. 

John W. Castelo attended the common and high schools, and then 
prepared himself for his profession of teaching by courses at the Val- 
paraiso University, and the Northwestern University, at Evanston, 111. 
In 1900 he began teaching in his native city, going thence to Oxford, 
Iowa, as superintendent of its school. From 1910 to 1914 he was county 
superintendent of schools of Cumberland County, 111., and then was at 
the Chicago University studying law. From 1915 to 1918 he was 
superintendent of the schools of Roanoke, 111., and in the latter year he 
was called to take charge of the Huntley school. 

In 1915 Professor Castelo was married to Miss Manda Walker, a 
daughter of Charles E. Walker, of Chicago, and they have two children: 
John W., who was born July 19, 1916, and Shirley May, who was born 
April 18, 1919. Mrs. Castelo is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church and he of the Presbyterian Church. In politics he is a Democrat. 
He belongs to Toledo Lodge No. 834, A. F. & A. M., and he also is a 
member of the Knights of Pythias and Modern Woodmen of America. 
A man of studious habits and possessing a natural talent for imparting 
knowledge to others, he has made his efforts in the educational field 
count for much, and is highly appreciated by all who know him. 



ROLLO GUY CHAMBERLIN. 

Rollo Guy Chamberlin, D. D. S., mayor of West McHenry, one of 
the leading men of McHenry County, is the exponent of the best element 



514 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

in this section, and a man of high principles and upright living. He 
was born in Michigan, .January 13, 1874, a son of Nathan and Jane 
i< raver) Chamberlin, the former of whom was a farmer of Michigan, 
and died in 1900. 

Hollo Guy Chamberlin attended the common and high schools, and 
was graduated from the latter in 1902, and then took a course in dentistry 
at the Illinois Dental College at Chicago. Following his completion of 
this course, he located at West McHenry, where he has since been 
engaged in the practice of his profession, and he has here built up a large 
and constantly increasing practice. In political faith he is a Republican, 
and in 1917 was elected mayor of West McHenry by a large majority, 
running ahead of his ticket because of his personal popularity. 

On September S, 1900, Doctor Chamberlin was married to Miss 
Fannie Densmore, a daughter of James A. Densmore, and they have the 
following children: Greeta M., Louise, and Rollo D. Doctor and Mrs. 
Chamberlin belong to the Methodist Episcopal Church. He maintains 
membership with the Masonic order and the Modern Woodmen of 
America. He and his wife belong to the Eastern Star. 



THOMAS CHARLES. 



Thomas Charles, one of the highly esteemed men of Woodstock, is 
now retired, but was formerly one of the energetic farmers of McHenry 
County. He was born in Pembrookshire, Wales, October 9, 1844, a 
son of David J. and Mary Ann Charles, of Welsh ancestry. In 1853 
they came to the United States, sailing from Liverpool, England, landing 
at New York City after a very stormy passage of seven weeks on the 
water. In 1867 Thomas Charles came to McHenry County and worked, 
making butter and cheese, for Robert Stewart in Hebron Township 
until 1870, having learned this trade in New York state. Mr. Charles 
then went with Henry Mead, proprietor of a creamery, and in 1872 
took charge of the Richmond factory which he operated for John 
McConnell, Peter Whitney, Doctor Bennett and others. 

In 1873 Thomas Charles was married to Mary E. Stewart, of Hebron 
Township, a daughter of Robert S. and Susan Stewart, and then began 
farming, renting land for six years in Hebron Township. He also ran 
a dairy to produce milk. Mrs. Charles died in August, 1878. In 1881, 
Mr. Charles was married (second) to Emma Murphy of Greenwood 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 515 

Township, a daughter of Owen J. and Emma C. Murphy of the same 
township. After his second marriage, Mr. Charles bought a farm, com- 
prising 138 acres of land, in Seneca Township, five miles west of Wood- 
stock, on the Marengo road. After remaining on that property for 
two years he traded it for property belonging to his father-in-law, Mr. 
Murphy, who continued to live with him, Mrs. Murphy having died. 
This farm comprised 232 acres and was located five miles north of 
Woodstock, on the Greenwood road. Mr. Murphy, who had been 
one of the pioneers of the county, died there in 1892, aged seventy-eight 
years. He came to the county from Virginia and obtained his farm 
from the government. After Mr. Charles secured this property he 
erected new buildings and made many improvements, and lived on it 
until when in 1913, he retired to Woodstock. He specialized on dairy- 
ing, milking over twenty cows. As his attention was fully occupied 
with his farm, Mr. Charles never cared to enter public life. 

By his first marriage Mr. Charles had a son, Robert S., who is 
managing his father's farm. The children born of Mr. Charles' second 
marriage are as follows: Paul L., who went to Winnipeg, Canada, in 
young manhood; Fred, who is on the old homestead; and Emma O., 
who is doing office work, lives at home. Mrs. Charles is a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church which her parents were instrumental 
in establishing in their vicinity. Mr. Charles is a straight Republican, 
but acts independently when he deems it best to do so. He and his 
family stand very high in McHenry and deserve the confidence dis- 
played in them, for they are fine people. 



EUGENE L. CHURCH. 



Eugene L. Church, one of the substantial residents of Harvard, has 
been an important factor in the industrial life of the city. He was born 
in Walworth County, Wis., eight miles north of Harvard, May 10, 1850, 
a son of Cyrus and Emily (Russell) Church, natives of Connecticut 
and Ohio, respectively, who were married in Wisconsin, to which state 
their families had come in 1836. Cyrus Church and his wife spent their 
lives on their Wisconsin farm, where he died at the age of eighty-two 
years. In addition to their son, Eugene L., they had a daughter, now 
Mrs. J. D. Clark of Harvard. 

Eugene L. Church was reared on his father's farm and was given an 



516 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

academic course. For sonic years after reaching maturity he traveled 

mi the road, but in 187S, come to Harvard to continue the manufacture 
of several patents, among them a Hon carrier for use in barns, which lie 
had commenced at Rockford, 111., two years previously. At different 

times lie had partners, and continued his business until 1000. lie man- 
ufactured in addition to his carrier, hog tools, and was very successful, 
dealing with retailers. In 1882 he secured an interest in a Hour-mill, 
hut sold it. preferring to devote his attention to his manufacturing. 
However, during the time he was connected with the mill he had it 
remodeled, and the new-process machinery installed. During 1881 he 
Imilt his present residence which is one of the show places of Harvard. 
Mr. Church owns the double brick block which bears his name and also 
the site of his former factory, having sold his plant in 1900. At present 
he is giving some attention to the conduct of his wife's farm in Wis- 
consin. Politically he is a Republican, has represented his ward in the 
city council, and has been on the school board for twenty-one years. 
during which period the schools were remodeled and modernized. 

In 1879 Mr. Church was united in marriage with Anna Hall of Wal- 
worth County, Wis., member of one of the pioneer families of that 
region. She owns the farm her grandfather entered from the govern- 
ment many years ago. Mr. and Mrs. Church have three daughters, 
namely: Ethel and Eloise, both of whom are at home; and Lucy, who 
is a teacher, who, after teaching for five .years at Fergus Falls, Minn., 
is now principal of the high school of Geneva, 111. She is a graduate of 
Beloit College, and a lady of unusual intellectual endowments, whose 
success in her chosen field is a source of gratification to her parents. 



LAWRENCE S. CHURCH. 
Page 132. 



PHILANDER W. CLARK. 

Philander W. ('lark, now deceased, was for many years one of the 
leading agriculturalists of Greenwood Township and a man of high 
standing in McHenry County. He was born in New York state, June 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 517 

20, 1838, but came to Greenwood Township in 1800. Mr. Clark was 
married to Rebecca J. Matthews, also a native of New York state, 
July 5, 1839, who survives him, and lives on their farm in Greenwood 
Township, being now over eighty years of age. They had the following 
children: Clinton H.; Minnie E., who is Mrs. George W. Maetsberger; 
Frank, who now operates the home farm, Lutie E., who is Mrs. M. 
Thomas; Matie M., who is the widow of Phil S. Harrison; Clyde C, 
who is with his brother Frank, is a member of the Modern Woodmen 
of America. He married Maude Abbott, who was born in McHenry 
County, June 8, 1879, a daughter of T. A. and Julia (Ryder) Abbott, 
natives of Illinois. George Abbott, Mrs. Clyde Clark's paternal grand- 
father, came to Illinois from New York state in 1845. Clyde Clark ami 
his wife have the following children: Alice May, born February 1'5, 1911 ; 
Leta, born December 13, 1912; Gordon, born April 5, 1915; and Eleanor, 
born July 30, 1917. 

The farm on which Mrs. Clark and her two sons are still residing 
is located on section 26, and contains 120 acres of as fine land as can 
be found in McHenry County. The family is one of the most highly 
esteemed in this section, and its members are important people in the 
county. 



SAMUEL D. CLARK. 



Samuel D. Clark, one of the progressive business men of Hebron, 
is successfully engaged in purveying choice meats and groceries and 
enjoys a wide-extended trade from the people of Hebron and its vicinity. 
He was born in Wisconsin, August 22, 1851, one of the five children of 
his parents, Osias and Lydia (Graves) Clark. Osias Clark was born in 
New York state, but later moved to Wisconsin, all of his active life 
devoting himself to farming. Both he and his wife are now deceased. 

Samuel D. Clark was reared on his father's farm, and attended the 
local schools. He was engaged in farming for a time, and then learned 
the butchering trade, and followed it until in 1898, when he came to 
Hebron and opened his present market. Later, he branched out, and 
now handles a choice line of fancy and staple groceries, his stock aggre- 
gating $3,000. 

In 1872 Mr. Clark was married to Miss Elizabeth Robinson, a 
daughter of Thomas Robinson, and they have three children, namely: 
William D., who is associated with his father in business; Byron W., 



518 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

who is engaged in business in California; and Kate, who is the wife of 
Montgomery Householder, of Hebron. Mr. < 'lark and his family belong 
to the Methodist Episcopal church. Politically he is a Republican. 
Recognized as the leading merchant of Hebron, Mr. Clark enjoys a 
patronage from the very best people of the city, who have implicit 
confidence in him and his judgment, and rely upon him for high grade 
foodstuffs, knowing that Ids prices will be as low as consistent with 
their quality, and that his service is at all times uniformly excellent. 



NATHAN B. CLAWSON. 

Nathan B. Clawson, junior member of the well known lumber and 
feed firm of Baldock & Clawson of Alden, is one of the successful business 
men of McHenry County, and belongs to one of the pioneer families 
of this region. He was born in Wisconsin, a son of George T. and 
Amanda M. (Helm) Clawson. Nathan B. Clawson attended the com- 
mon schools, and in 1910, he formed his present connection, his partner 
being Jay L. Baldock. This business house, which is one of the largest 
of its kind in this locality, was founded by John Baldock in 1890, and 
operated by him until 1910, when he sold to the present firm, the mem- 
bers being his son and son-in-law, respectively. The firm deals exten- 
sively in lumber, coal and feed, the annual sales aggregating $50,000. 

On October 24, 1894, Mr. Clawson was united in marriage with 
Miss Jessie M. Baldock, a daughter of John Baldock. Mr. and Mrs. 
Clawson became the parents of the following children: George, who was 
born September 18, 1895, died January 2, 1908; Eugene, who was born 
May 10, 1905, died July 23, 1905; and Frank, who was born June 27, 
1906. 

In politics Mr. Clawson is a Republican. Mr. and Mrs. Clawson 
belong to the Methodist Episcopal church. He belongs to Hebron 
Lodge, A. F. & A. M. One of the alert business men of Alden, Mr. 
Clawson deserves the prosperity which has attended him, and is de- 
servedly numbered among the representative men of the county. 



JOHN F. CLAXTON. 



John F. Claxton, proprietor of the "Woodland Dairy Farm," located 
one mile east of the city of McHenry, is one of the progressive agricul- 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 519 

turalists of McHenry County. He was born in Nunda Township, three 
miles south of McHenry, November 11, 1857, a son of John and Maria 
(Page) Claxton, the latter being a daughter of Joseph Page, sister of 
William Page and aunt of Charles E. Page, and a native of County 
Kent, England. A sketch of the Page family is given elsewhere in this 
work. John Claxton was born in the County of Norfolk, England, 
August 14, 1815, and when he was eighteen years old came to the 
United States, landing at Boston, Mass., making the trip in a sailing- 
vessel that took seventy-two days on the water. He later worked in 
a mill in Oneida County, N. Y., remaining with one company for fifteen 
years, but received such small wages that he decided to seek better 
opportunities, and coming to Illinois, rented land in McHenry County 
for a year, and then bought seventy acres of land in Nunda Township, 
all of which was then raw prairie. After four years on it, he exchanged 
that farm for 160 acres, taking possession of it in 1862. On the place 
were an old house and barn, and before he moved to it, he erected 
portion of the present residence. He died on this farm, October 6, 1885, 
his widow surviving him until October 26, 1892, he being sixty-nine years 
old at the time of death, and she seventy-six. Five years prior to his 
death John Claxton was kicked by a horse, and he never fully recovered. 
He and his wife had the following children: Mary, who is the widow 
of Charles H. Parks, lives at McHenry; William, who died during the 
Civil war, while a member of the One Hundred and Forty-seventh 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry, after a year's service, being then but eigh- 
teen years of age; Emma, who is the widow of William H. Mudget of 
Chicago; and John F., whose name heads this review. 

John F. Claxton took charge of the homestead when his father was 
injured, and when he died, bought the interest of the other heirs in the 
farm. Since then he has bought the old Wilson farm of 200 acres adjoin- 
ing his original farm on the east, so that he now owns and operates 
360 acres of very valuable land. The present residence, which was 
built by his father, was remodeled by him in 1911, and he put in hot 
and cold water, electric lights and other modern improvements. He 
enlarged his barn and built two silos and a dairy barn to accommodate 
his herd of forty-five thoroughbred cattle and his registered bull. He 
also has a fine drove of Poland-China hogs. Mr. Claxton is a stalwart 
Republican, but aside from serving on the board of education, has not 
sought political honors. As a member of that body, he has rendered 
very efficient service for sixteen years, for twelve of them being con- 
nected with the McHenry district. 



520 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

» >n January 18, 1882, Mr. Claxton was united in marriage with 

Mercy E. Fryer, a sister of the first wife of Charles I.. Page of McHenry, 
and a daughter of .lames and Julia Fryer, natives of County Kent and 
London, England, who came to the United States and landed at New 
York City, where their daughter was born. In 1850 they came west to 
Illinois, and located in McHenry County. In 1886 or 1887, Mr. and 
Mrs. Fryer went to Dakota, where both died, leaving two daughters, 
Mrs. Claxton and Mrs. Page in McHenry County. Mr. and Mrs. 
< 'laxton became the parents of the following children: William, who 
was graduated from the McHenry High School, is living at home; Pearl 
and Ruby, both of whom attended the McHenry High School, are al 
home; and the former is a teacher in that school, having been connected 
with it for some time ; and Lelah, who was graduated from the same school 
as her brother. The family all attend and support the Methodist 
Episcopal church. Fraternally Mr. Claxton belongs to the Masons 
and the Modern Woodmen of America. His three daughters belong 
to the Eastern Star. He is one of the most representative men of the 
county, and all of his operations are carried on intelligently and capably. 
His family is a charming one, and their influence on their community 
cannot help but be of an elevating and inspiring nature. 



JAMES R. CLEARY. 



James R. Cleary, postmaster of Marengo, and one of the most sub- 
stantial and highly respected men of McHenry County, is an extensive 
owner of choice McHenry County farm land. He was born at Marengo, 
May 24, 1860, one of the six children of his parents, Cornelius and 
Catherine (Hartnett) Cleary. Cornelius Cleary was born in Ireland, 
but came to the United States in 1848, and after some time spent in 
New York state, came west to McHenry County, and located in Marengo, 
where he died in 1886. 

James R. Cleary attended the common and high schools of Marengo, 
and was reared on a farm. He was engaged in farming until 1892, when 
he branched out into a stock business and followed it until he was 
appointed by President AVilson, postmaster of Marengo, September ] , 
1915. He has under his supervision three people, and the post office 
is admirably conducted by him. 

On November 15, 1913, Mr. Cleary was married to Miss Delia M. 



HISTORY OP McHENRY COUNTY 521 

Green, a daughter of James Green, and they have two sons, James 
G., who was born September 28, 1915, and William J., who was born 
July 27, 1919. Mr. and Mrs. Cleary are devout members of the Roman 
Catholic Church. He belongs to the Knights of Columbus and the 
Modern Woodmen. Politically, he is a staunch Democrat, and has 
given the administration a loyal support, especially during the late 
war. For one term he served Marengo as alderman from his ward, 
and he is properly regarded as one of the leaders in his party. In addi- 
tion to other interests, Mr. Cleary owns two farms in Marengo Town- 
ship, comprising 237 acres of fine land. 



WILLIAM CLEARY. 



William Cleary, who was formerly one of the most successful farmers 
of McHenry County, is now living in comfortable retirement at Marengo, 
where he is numbered among the most desirable citizens of that village. 
He was born in the northwestern part of Marengo Township, April 
20, 1858, a son of Cornelius and Catherine (Hartnett) Cleary, a sketch 
of whom is to be found elsewhere in this work. 

William Cleary grew up on the home farm of his father, and when 
his father died he bought the interest of the other heirs to the homestead, 
which he has since conducted in partnership with his brother James. 
After they secured the farm they erected new buildings, and made other 
improvements. A drainage district passes through the farm by means 
of which 100 acres have been reclaimed. The brothers lived in one 
house for a time, but later sold 120 acres of the farm and erected a new- 
set of buildings. For years they were engaged in dairying, and built 
a creamery on the farm which was operated as a co-operative concern, 
but they later became butter producers themselves and so continued 
for two or three years. Later they sold their milk to Bordens, and had 
from thirty to forty cows in their herd. In 1894 William Cleary left 
1 he farm and came to Marengo, but continues his interest in his farm 
and keeps up its improvements. He has never cared to enter public 
life, devoting himself to his own affairs, but at the same time he takes 
an intelligent interest in civic matters, and wants to have everything 
done which will advance his community. In his political views he is a 
Democrat. Mr. Cleary has never married, and he and his sister, Ellen, 
who was born December 2, 1852, live together, she acting as his house- 



522 HISTORY OP McHEXRY COUNTY 

keeper. The Church of the Sacred Heart of Marengo holds his member- 
ship, and he is doubly attached to it as his parents were among the 
original members of the parish, and he also belongs to the Knights of 
Columbus, and Foresters. The Cleary family is a very highly respected 
one in this region, and William Cleary is an admirable representative 
of the sturdy characteristics of his parents, who are still well remembered 
in this locality where for years they were leading factors. 



J. EDWARD COFFEY. 



J. Edward Coffey, a prosperous farmer of Greenwood Township, 
owns and operates 160 acres of valuable land on section 8. He was 
born in Greenwood Township, May 9, 1865, a son of Thomas and Mary 
(Clarissy) Coffey, the former born in Ireland, and the latter in Massa- 
chusetts. When he was fourteen years old, Thomas Coffey was brought 
to the United States by his parents and they located in Wisconsin and 
became farming people of that state. In 1864, Thomas Coffey located 
on a farm in Greenwood Township, McHenry County, about one-half 
a mile north of the farm now owned by his son, J. Edward Coffey, and 
there he lived until his death in 1908, when he was seventy-four years 
old. His widow survives, being now over seventy years old. They had 
ten children, six of whom survive. The homestead farm of Thomas 
Coffey contained 3S0 acres, and he owned another farm of 120 acres, 
and all of it he placed under cultivation. 

J. Edward Coffey was reared on this homestead, and attended the 
schools of his native township. In 1896, he was married to Maggie 
Halloran, born in Alden Township, this county. They have two sons, 
Gilbert and Paul. Since he moved on his present farm, Mr. Coffey has 
devoted himself to general farming, and his property is one of the best 
in the township. He and his wife belong to the Catholic Church. His 
political affiliations are with the Democratic party. A practical farmer, 
he has made his work count for much, and deserves his reputation of 
being a sound business man and excellent citizen. 



AMOS COGSWELL. 
Page 135. 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 523 

ALSON J. COLE. 

Alson J. Cole, president of the Hebron State Bank, and owner of 320 
acres of very valuable land in Hebron Township, is one of the most 
prominent men of McHenry County. He was born in Stephentown, 
New York, February 2, 1863, one of the three children of Dr. Melvin J. 
and Mary A. (Whitman) Cole. Melvin J. Cole was a physician and 
farmer, who was born in Massachusetts, but later moved to New York, 
and thence to McHenry County, where he located at Hebron. He died 
at Hebron, October 9, 1900. His widow survived him until January, 
1905, when she, too, passed away. 

Alson J. Cole was reared on a farm, and attended the schools of 
Hebron Township. After reaching his majority, he embraced farming 
as his life work, and has always been interested in agricultural matters, 
although he has been engaged along other lines as well, for ten years 
conducting one of the leading mercantile establishments of Hebron, 
and now being largely interested in the Hebron Bank, of which he is 
president, which office he has held since 1906. 

On March 16, 1896, Mr. Cole was married to Miss Libbie Rotnour, 
a daughter of Sanford Rotnour, and they had one daughter Carolyn, 
who lives at home. Mrs. Cole died January 26, 1913. After her death, 
Mr. Cole was married (second) to Mrs. Susan M. Meyers, who belongs 
to one of the oldest pioneer families in the county. Mr. Cole has been 
very prominent in the Republican party, serving in the Hebron council 
for seven years, and as mayor of Hebron for one term. A Mason, he 
belongs to Hebron Lodge No. 604, A. F. & A. M., Harvard Chapter 
No. 91, R. A. M., and Calvary Commandery No. 25, K. T. He is also 
a member of Hebron Lodge No. 767, j.. O. O. F. His connection with 
the Hebron bank as its chief executive official, gives it solidity and 
prominence, for his own record as a business man and citizen has been 
such as to reflect credit upon him and his associates. 



THOMAS. D. COLE. 



With the passing of the late Thomas D. Cole another of the honored 
sons of McHenry County has gone to his last reward, leaving behind 
him a record of uprightness, sterling integrity, and dependable work 
both as an experienced agriculturalist and public-spirited citizen. He 



524 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

was still in the prime of life, 1 mt during the years accorded him, he 
accomplished much, and dying, left many friends, and few enemies, 
behind him. The example of a blameless life such as his cannot help 
but be beneficial in his neighborhood, and prove a stimulus to the rising 
generation to order their lives in like manner. 

The birth of Thomas D. Cole occurred on the farm so long occupied 
by him, in Burton Township, one mile east of Spring Grove, December 
18, 18(>9. He was a son of Franklin M. and Emily M. (Stevens) Cole. 
Franklin M. Cole was born at East Andover, Merrimack County, N. II., 
January 4. 1836, and his wife was born September 27, 1841. The parents 
of Franklin M. Cole, Miles and Sallie (Bixby) Cole, natives of New 
Hampshire, decided that the old New England home was too narrow, 
and so set out for the West, packing their household possessions in two 
covered wagons, one of which was on springs, something then quite new, 
and made the long trip overland, being seven weeks on the road, and 
arriving in what is known as the Creek District, McHenry County, in 
November, 1838. They entered the farm from the government which 
was so long controlled by Thomas D. Cole, and here they rounded out 
their lives, dying in old age before the birth of their grandson. They 
had six children, of whom four grew to maturity, namely: Miles Harmon, 
who was a miller of Richmond; Ransom B.; Harvey, who went to 
California and was lost trace of; Franklin M.; Martha, who married 
Thomas Kimball, a farmer of Lake County, 111., died in old age; and 
Mandana, who married Lewis Hatch, lived near the homestead in 
Burton Township, and they had the following children: Miles, Fred, 
Frank and Martha Loretta Hatch. 

Franklin M. Cole was married in Lake County, his wife being the 
daughter of Peter and Elizabeth Stevens, natives of Brattlcboro, Yt., 
and Utica, N. Y. A -sketch of the Stevens family is given elsewhere in 
this work. As a lad Mr. Stevens had come to Illinois and settled in 
Lake County, where he lived for many years, but his last days were 
spent with Mr. and Mrs. Cole. Franklin M. Cole secured the home- 
stead of his father, and spent his life upon it, and in 1871 erected the 
residence now standing. The farm originally contained 520 acres, anil 
he operated it as a general farmer and stockraiser, breeding short-horn 
cattle, which he exhibited at county fairs. A Republican, he served cm 
the school board and as road commissioner. His death occurred May 
20, 1895, his widow surviving him until May 8, 1918, when she died on 
the farm which had been her home from the time of her marriage. Their 
children were as follows: Lucy, who died in childhood; Warren, who died 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 525 

March 13, 1920; Alice, who died at the age of sixteen years; Thomas D., 
whose name heads this review; John, who died in young manhood; 
Frank, who died in childhood; and Annie, who died in young womanhood. 

Thomas D. Cole spent his life on the old Cole homestead, and for 
sixteen years operated it in partnership with his brother, Warren, who 
died five months prior to his own demise. They were enterprising 
farmers and stoekraisers, and very successful in all of their operations. 
Thomas D. Cole was married to Ida M. Dodge, who was horn at Apple- 
ton, Wis., and they had three children, namely: Franklin Dodge, 
Martha Elizabeth and Edith Stevens. Like his father, Mr. Cole served 
on the school board. He maintained fraternal relations with the 
Modern Woodmen of America. Mr. Cole died August 13, 1920, very 
suddenly at his old home, and his funeral was held August 15, there 
being a very large attendance as his many warm, personal friends came 
to pay a last tribute to one whom they held in such high regard. The 
services were conducted by Rev. Clay E. Palmer, of Richmond, and 
interment was made in the Cole Cemetery. 

Mr. Cole was not a man who sought public honors. His happiness 
was found in his home, and with his family. He knew how to carry on 
farming capably, and was never afraid of hard work. A friend of the 
public schools, he tried hard to raise the standard of those in his neigh- 
borhood, and also did all in his power to improve conditions in his town- 
ship and county. A good man is gone, but the results of his earnestness 
and sincerity remain and live after all that is mortal of him has crumbled 
to dust. 



JOHN CONLEY. 



John Conley, one of the progressive farmers of Grafton Township, 
is entitled to be numbered among the representative men of McHenry 
County. He was born in Grafton Township, October 7, 1866, where for 
a number of years his father, Owen Conley, was engaged in farming. 
Owen Conley and his wife, Marguerite (McCue) Conley, were natives 
of Ireland, but came to the United States when young, and located in 
Grafton Township. Here he died February 18, 1894. They had five 
children born to them. 

John Conley attended the local schools and was reared on the farm 
where he has always resided, it comprising 236 acres of valuable land, 



.".l'i; HISTORY OP McHENRY COUNTY 

all improved, on which he is carrying on general farming an<l stock 
raising. 

Mr. Gonley was united in marriage with Miss Agnes Driscoll, a 
daughter of John Driscoll, one of the leading men of McHenry County. 
In politics Mr. Conley is a Democrat, and he has ever been very active 
in local affairs, serving as road commissioner for twelve years, and was 
elected supervisor for Grafton Township in the spring of 1918. He and 
his family are members of the Catholic church. 



MICHAEL CONLEY. 



Michael Conley, who represents one of the old families of McHenry 
County, is a native son of this county, and is now successfully engaged in 
general farming and dairying in Nunda Township. He was born in 
Dorr Township, February 14, 1854, a son of William and Anna S. 
(Hanrahan) Conley, the former of whom was born in Kilkenny County, 
Ireland in 1813, where he was married. In 1849 he and his wife came 
to the United States and for a time they lived at Pittsburgh, Pa., from 
whence they came to McHenry County. He died on his farm of thirty 
acres, in Nunda Township. They had six children, all of whom are 
living, they being as follows: Ann, who is Mrs. Welsh; Bridget, who is 
Mrs. M. Dailey; Michael; James; Margaret, who is Mrs. Fitszimmons; 
and Kate, who is Mrs. Hanrahan. 

Michael Conley has spent his life on his farm, and has been engaged 
in farming for thirty-one years. He now owns 240 acres of land, and 
he has a herd of thirty cows. An earnest, industrious man and good 
farmer, he is regarded as one of the desirable citizens of this county. 
He is a member of the Catholic church. 



FRED A. COOLEY. 



Fred A. Cooley, who is one of the progressive business men of West 
McHenry, deals in agricultural implements and owns and conducts 
the West McHenry Feed Mills. He was born in Illinois, December 19, 
1870, one of the four children of his parents, Henry and Frances E. 
(Rowe) Cooley. Henry Cooley was born in Vermont, but later moved 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 527 

to Illinois, and was a farmer all his life. He died in 1914, and his wife 
is also deceased. 

Fred A. Cooley was reared on a farm, and was sent to the district 
schools. He was engaged in farming until 1916, when he established 
himself at West McHenry, organizing his present implement business, 
and buying his feed mill. In his implement business he carries a stock 
of $20,000, and his trade is a large one and it comes from a wide territory. 

Mr. Cooley was united in marriage with Miss Matilda K. Seyler, 
a daughter of Conrad Seyler, and a member of a prominent family of 
McHenry County. Mr. and Mrs. Cooley have the following children: 
Floyd, Opal and Jennie M. 



A. B. COON. 
Page 133. 

JOHN HOWARD CORNUE. 

John Howard Cornue, who is living retired on his farm in Alden 
Township, three miles west of Hebron, and fifteen miles northwest of 
Woodstock, on the "state line, is one of the well known men of McHenry 
County. He was born on the family homestead, one mile west of his 
present home, November 5, 1856, a son of Daniel A. and Sarah Jane 
(Olmstead) Cornue, natives of New York. 

Daniel A. Cornue came to Illinois in 1844, and took up wild land on 
which he built a house, but for a time he worked out by the month to 
obtain a little ready money, but later settled on his farm. Although he 
devoted much time and attention to this farm, he was one of the organ- 
izers of the Alden Mutual Fire Insurance Company, and continued a 
member of its board of directors as long as he lived. He also helped to 
organize the Lynn-Hebron Presbyterian church two miles away from 
his farm, and was on the committee which built the church edifice, as 
well as on the official board. He is buried in the cemetery connected 
with that church. His family was as follows: Melvin C, who is a retired 
farmer of Steuben County, N. Y. ; Elvira, who is Mrs. Doric Porter, lives 
at Kansas City, Mo.; John Howard, whose name heads this review; 



528 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

William Duane, who owns the old homestead, is living at Hebron, 
:mil a sketch of him appears elsewhere in this work: and Ellen, who 
married Fred Thacher, lives at Stanley, Wis. 

.John Howard Cornue was reared on the homestead and assisted in 
clearing off and breaking the land. He was married February 9, 1881, 
to Emma ,J. Weter, a daughter of M. E. and Delia (Mickle) Weter, both 
now living at Hebron. Immediately following his marriage, Mr. Cornue 
began housekeeping on his present farm, originally the James Cornue 
farm. At first Mr. Cornue bought 100 acres, later adding forty acres 
so that he now has 140 acres, and on this farm he has erected nearly 
all the present buildings and made many other improvements, this being 
considered one of the best farms in the township. He carries on dairying 
and keeps twenty-five cows. For eleven years he bred thoroughbred 
Holstein cattle and kept fifty or sixty head, milking from twenty-five 
to thirty, and shipped breeding animals and had sales of his product. 
His son is also a breeder. Mr. and Mrs. Cornue have the following 
children: Arthur D., who operates the farm, married Ethel M. Turner 
and they have three children, James Howard, Wesley Turner and 
Richard Arthur; Harvey E., who is a ranchman of Winnett, Mont.; 
Elsie Evelyn, who died on her fifteenth birthday; E. C, who is a locomo- 
tive engineer on the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad, went into the 
army May 21, 1918. Mr. Cornue belongs to the old Lynn-Hebron 
Presbyterian church with which his family has been associated for so 
many years. 



WILLIAM DUANE CORNUE. 

William Duane Cornue, one of the retired farmers of Hebron, was 
formerly very active in the agricultural life of McHenry County. He 
was born on his father's farm in Alden Township, on the Wisconsin 
state line, four miles west of Hebron, October 3, 1861. Remaining on 
the homestead, he secured it in 1884, and lived upon it until he retired 
in 1903, since which time he has had a tenant to conduct it. The farm 
now contains 240 acres of well developed land, and the buildings were 
erected by his father but have been kept in fine condition by him, and 
he had added to them and rebuilt, and has everything suitable for dairy 
farming. Mr. Cornue owns another farm of 160 acres one mile from the 
homestead, on which he has erected new buildings and put in drainage 
to redeem the former wet land that now is very productive. While he 



HISTORY OF McHBNRY COUNTY 529 

has left his farm he keeps up his interest in it and owns stock in partner- 
ship with his tenant. Mr. Cornue was one of the directors of the Alden 
Mutual Insurance Company, and served it as secretary for about eight 
years. A staunch Republican, he has been committeeman, delegate to 
county and state conventions, and served his township as road com- 
missioner and supervisor, rendering valuable service in both offices, his 
occupancy of the former office being during the nineties, and also as 
assessor for several years. 

Mr. Cornue was married September 15, 1903, to Ada B. Wilson, a 
daughter of John and Lucetta (McColhern) Wilson, of Sharon, Wis. 
Both parents are now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Cornue have one son, 
Stanley Huntington, born October 27, 1909. Mr. and Mrs. Cornue are 
members of the Presbyterian church of Hebron, of which he is an elder, 
and he served in the same capacity in the Lynn-Hebron church two 
miles distant from his old home, and he has been a delegate to the synod 
and the general assembly of his church at Kansas City, Mo. The 
Cornue farm is one of the best developed properties in the county, and 
in addition to it and his other farm here, Mr. Cornue owns 240 acres in 
North Dakota and 80 acres in Wisconsin. He is one of the most highly 
respected men of this region, and deserves the confidence he inspires as 
well as the success which has attended him. 



ROBERT E. CORLETT. 

Robert E. Corlett of Chemung Township, has one of the most valu- 
able, well improved and efficiently-operated farms of this region, and 
his home is a delightful one. He was born on the Isle of Man, August 
2, 1852, a son of John and Catherine (Corlett) Corlett. The name of 
Corlett is found as frequently on the Isle of Man as the one of Smith 
is in the United States. In 1853 the parents came to the United States, 
and upon landing crossed the country to Illinois, and spent a year in 
Richmond Township, McHenry County, leaving it in 1856 to go to 
Lodi, Wis., where they remained on a farm until 1865, at which time 
they returned to Richmond Township, and in the spring of 1880 located 
on the farm in Chemung Township now owned by their son, Robert. 
A brother of John Corlett had preceded him to this country, and set- 
tled at Rochester, N. Y., where he died. John Corlett died in 1915, 
aged ninety-one years. He was a powerful man both mentally and 



530 HISTORY OF McIIEXRY COUNTY 

physically, and always kept well posted through reading and study. 
All of his life he was a local preacher, and he was one of the best known 
men of the county. His wife died when she was eighty-four years old. 
The family is noted for its longevity on both sides, Mrs. Corlett's two 
sisters, who died on the Isle of Man. lived to be eighty-nine and ninety, 
respectively. The children born to John Corlett and his wife were as 
follows: Robert E., whose name heads this review: Ceaser Eugene, who 
is a farmer at Ord, Valley County, Xebr. ; and Albert Edwin, who died 
in 1917 at the age of fifty-eight years, having gone to the stale of Wash- 
ington when he was twenty years old. 

Robert Corlett remained at home and as his father grew older, he 
assumed the responsibilities of the farm. All of the present improve- 
ments on the farm, consisting of a modern residence, commodious barn, 
two silos and similar buildings, have been erected since the Corlett 
family has owned the property. At first stockraising was rallied on, 
but now Mr. Corlett is devoting himself principally to dairying, and 
has a herd of from twenty to thirty cows, of the Holstein strain, but 
does not exhibit. A Republican, he is strongly in favor of Prohibition, 
and his father did some very effective speaking in favor of the move- 
ment, and working with the anti-saloon element. However when it 
comes to casting his vote, he supports the candidates of the Republican 
party. 

When he was twenty-eight years old Robert Corlett was united in 
marriage with Christian Cowlin, born in the Isle of Man, who came to 
the United States in 1S80. Mr. and Mrs. Corlett have the following 
children: Ralph, who is at home; Mona, who is Mrs. C. I. Coate-, lives 
at Monroe. Wis., has three children, John R., Elizabeth, and Elinor. 
Albert E., and Bertha, who are both at home. The sons are assisting 
their father in operating the farm. Interested in securing good educa- 
tional facilities for the children, Mr. Corlett served for some time on 
the school board, and the excellent schools in his section owe much to 
his good judgment and wise foresight. He is one of the exceptional 
men of the county, and he and his family are numbered among the most 
desirable and worth-while people in this region. 



FLOYD E. COYALT. 



Floyd E. Covalt, local manager for the Wilbur Lumber Company at 
Mc Henry, is one of the enterprising and representative men of this part 





^zd 




HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY • 531 

of McHenry County. He was born in McHenry County, July 11, 
1884, one of the six children of his parents, Floyd W. and Harriett 
(O'Connell) Covalt. Floyd W. Covalt was the manager of the Wilbur 
Lumber Company at Crystal Lake, where he is now living retired from 
active participation in business life. At one time he was mayor of 
Crystal Lake. 

Floyd E. Covalt attended the common and high schools of Crystal 
Lake, and as soon as he had completed his studies entered the employ 
of his present company at Crystal Lake, under his father's management. 
In 1908 he obtained his deserved promotion to be manager of the plant 
of that company at McHenry. This branch does a business of 8200,000 
annually. The officers of the company arc: R. W. Houghton, president; 
R. H. Wilbur, vice-president; and George H. Wilbur, secretary and 
treasurer. 

In 1907 Mr. Covalt was married to Miss Carrie E. Himler, a daughter 
of George A. Himler, of West McHenry. Mr. and Mrs. Covalt have two 
children, namely: Floyd E., Jr., who was born January 29, 1914; and 
Shirley M., who was born October 7, 1917. Mr. Covalt is a Republican. 
A Mason, he belongs to McHenry Lodge No. 158, A. F. & A. M., of 
which he is Past Master; McHenry Chapter No. 36, R. A. M.; Calvary 
Commandery No. 25, K. T., and he is District Deputy Grand Master of 
the Twenty-first District. He also belongs to Valley Camp, M. W. A. 



EMMETT C. COVELL. 



Emmett C. Covell, mayor of Richmond, and one of the retired 
farmers of McHenry County, formerly was very prominent in agri- 
cultural circles, and still owns 280 acres of valuable farm land. He 
was born at Sugar Creek, Wis., June 20, 1856, one of the seven children 
of his parents, Charles and Phebe (Persons) Covell, of whom three 
survive. Charles Covell was born in New York, and there learned 
the trade of a carpenter, and worked on the erection of churches and 
public buildings. In 1862, he came to McHenry County, and his death 
occurred April 5, 1905, when he was eighty-six years old. His wife 
was born in Massachusetts, December 25, 1818, and died August 12, 
1905. 

Emmett C. Covell attended the schools of McHenry County, and 
was brought up on a farm, and still oversees the operation of his large 



532 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

farm of 2S0 acres, although he retired from active participation in the 

work in 1905, when he moved to Richmond and erected a handsome 
residence. In 1901 he was elected mayor of Richmond, and has held 
that office ever since, and he has also been a justice of the peace, and 
police magistrate of Richmond. In addition to his farming interests, 
Mr. Covell was one of the board of directors of the creamery, and was 
manager of it for a number of years. 

( )n August 22, 1888, Mr. Covell was married to Miss Cora H. McCon- 
nell, a daughter of George McConnell, formerly a banker of Richmond, 
but now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Covell became the parents of the 
following children: Nellie B., who is now Mrs. John Westmont of 
Wisconsin; George C, whose death occurred in 1914; Grace L., who is 
Mrs. Walter Kruse, lives in Aurora, 111., and Hattie M., C. Bonepart, 
Marguerite, Cora M., and William, all of whom are at home. The 
family all belong to the Methodist Episcopal church, and are very 
prominent in it. Mr. Covell is a Republican. Fraternally he is a 
Mason and has been advanced in that order to be a Knight Templar. 
Mrs. Covell and the daughter Hattie are members of the Eastern Star. 
A man of sound principles and practical ideas, his counsel is sought 
upon many occasions, and he is held in the highest esteem by all who 
know him. 



LUCIEN B. COVELL. 



Lucien B. Covell, supervisor of Richmond Township, and one of its 
most representative men, is the owner of a very valuable farm of 200 
acres in Richmond Township. He was born in New York state, No- 
vember 22, 1848, a son of Charles and Phebe (Persons) Covell, and 
brother of E. C. Covell. Charles Covell was born in New York state, 
and his wife was born in Massachusetts, the date of his birth being 
1819, and hers December 25, 1818. He died April 5, 1905, and she passed 
away August 12, 1905. Charles Covell was a carpenter, and in 1862 
he came to McHenry County, where he spent the remainder of his life. 
He specialized in building churches and public buildings. He and his 
wife had seven children, of whom three now survive. 

Lucien B. Covell attended the common schools, and was reared to 
work on the farm, and has always been engaged in agricultural pursuits. 
Mr. Covell was married to Miss Anna Moore, a daughter of William 
Moore. There are no children. Mr. Covell is a Republican, and one 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 533 

of the leaders of his party locally. In 1897 he was elected supervisor of 
Richmond Township, and held that office for twenty-two years, or until 
ill health compelled him to retire. For forty-six years he was a director 
of the school board of Richmond, where he now maintains his residence, 
although he continues to oversee the operation of his fine farm several 
miles distant. Mrs. Covell taught school for six years. Both he and 
Mrs. Covell belong to the Methodist Episcopal Church. His fraternal 
connections are with the Masonic Order. A man of unusual capabilities, 
he has exerted himself to such good purpose that he is not only a man of 
ample means, but one who has accomplished much for his community, 
and gained the approbation of his fellow citizens. 



ROBERT COWAN. 



Robert Cowan, a progressive farmer of section 1, Grafton Township, 
is making a specialty of raising Shropshire sheep, and he is justly re- 
garded as one of the representative farmers of McHenry County. He 
was born in Will County, 111., August 10, 1869, a son of John and Mary 
(Allen) Cowan, the former of whom was born in Scotland in 1833, and 
came to the United States in 1865, settling in Will County, where he 
was engaged in farming. He lived to be eighty-three years. old. His 
wife was born in Canada of Scotch ancestry. 

Robert Cowan was reared in Will County, and educated there, 
learning farming under the wise direction of his father, and he has 
always been engaged in this line, and with the exception of three years 
in Iowa, has spent his life in Illinois. On March 7, 1912, he moved to his 
present farm, which comprises 160 acres on section 11. 

On August 19, 1896, Mr. Cowan was married to Ellen Frydendall, 
a native of Kane County, 111., where she was born March 16, 1874, 
and they have eleven children, as follows: Elizabeth, Emory, Bruce, 
Burton, William, John, Dean, Gordon, Grace, Verdell and Florence. 
Mr. Cowan is a member of the Presbyterian church, and his wife belongs 
to the Congregational church. Both of them are Republicans. Under- 
standing as he does farming in every particular, he has made his work 
count for something, and deserves the prosperity which has attended 
him. 



FRANK CARROLL CURTIS. 

Frank Carroll Curtis, who is located on the old Poyer farm in Marengo 
Township, five miles northwest of Marengo, on the River road and near 



534 HISTORY OF McIIENRY COUNTY 

Seven Bridges, is one of the substantial farmers of McHenry County. 
He was born at Hebron, Jefferson County, Wis., May 19, 1859, and 
was then- reared by his grandparents. His maternal grandfather, 
.lames Folts, came to Wisconsin from New York when the country was 
undeveloped. 

In 1SS6 Frank C. Curtis came to McHenry County and bought the 
John Foyer farm, then containing 213 acres. John Poyer, then deceased, 
had lived on this farm for many years and erected the present house, 
using a portion of the original residence built on an old Indian trail 
on another part of the farm. John Poyer's son, Delos Poyer, owned 
and operated the farm just opposite. The barn, which has a full base- 
ment, is 32 x 134 feet, with an el 28 x 30 feet of the same height, and 
was built by Mr. Curtis. He also built two cement silos, and uses all 
of the basement for stabling. Dairying is his main feature, and he 
keeps from thirty to forty cows. His farm is one of the finest oiuthe 
Fiver Road. While he is a strong Republican, Mr. Curtis has never 
eared for office. 

In 1883 Mr. Curtis was married to Angie King of Whitewater, Wis., 
a daughter of Edward King, who erected one of the first houses at White- 
water. When Mr. King reached Whitewater he had but fifty cents in 
his pocket and used that to pay postage on a letter. He had to hunt 
a job before he had any supper. For some time he worked at his trade 
as a carpenter, and then became a farmer. 

Mr. and Mrs. Curtis became the parents of the following children: 
Flora, who married Verne Sisson, lives near Capron, in Boone County, 
and has three children, Clarence, Vera and Eugene; Lillian, who married 
H. A. Walton, a mechanic of Woodstock, has two children, Hugh and 
Dorothy; Carroll, who is at home on the farm; and Mark, who was the 
eldest, is deceased. He died in 1914 when in his thirtieth year. This 
estimable young man had remained at home and become one of the 
reliable residents of his township. A Mason and Odd Fellow, he was 
well known in both orders, passed all the chairs in the latter fraternity 
at Garden Prairie. While he was operating a small pumping engine, 
his overalls were caught by the starting shaft, and his body drawn into 
the machinery so that his foot was mangled. He was taken to the Elgin 
Hospital, but blood poison set in and death resulted. Few young men 
are as deeply mourned as was he, not only by his family and brother 
lodge members, but by the whole community. For years he had been 
a consistent member of the Baptist church of Marengo, and lived up 
to its teachings in his everyday life. 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 535 

IRA R. CURTISS. 
Page 134. 






TIMOTHY J. DACY. 



Timothy J. Dacy, now deceased, was formerly one of the most 
substantial business men of Woodstock, and one who left behind him 
a record for upright dealing and kindly actions. For years he was one 
of the leading dealers in agricultural implements of the county, and he 
was known throughout this region as few men are. He was born in 
Ireland in 1838, and when he was twelve years old his parents started 
for the United States, but while on the ocean the good mother died and 
was buried at sea. After reaching this country, the little party came 
to McHemy County and located in Hartland Township, where the father 
obtained work with the railroad, but the children were thrown upon 
their own resources, and Timothy J. Dacy early learned to be self- 
supporting. For some years he worked for Robert Forrest, and in the 
winters attended school whenever it was possible for him to do so. 

Leaving farm work, in 1861, Mr. Dacy came to Woodstock, entering 
the employ of John J. Murphy, dealer in grain and wool, and remained 
with him for several years. In 1863 Mr. Dacy's interest was aroused 
in a patent gate, and he was induced to invest his savings in it, and he 
purchased the right to sell it in a small territory, later acquiring a larger 
field until he sold the gate all over the United States and Canada, and 
met with a very gratifying success. In 1865 he returned to Woodstock 
and embarked in a farm products business, continuing that until he 
formed a partnership with W. B. Austin for the purpose of handling 
farm implements, which business was carried on until March, 1880, 
although in the meanwhile Mr. Dacy had become the sole owner, but 
in that month the entire plant was destroyed by fire, entailing a loss of 
$20,000, which was only covered by $2,000 insurance. Mr. Dacy 
immediately set to work clearing away the debris, and sold at auction 
the damaged farm machinery, as well as other goods he immediately 
ordered, and in this way acquired a working capital, and made his name 
known throughout a wide territory. Mr. Dacy then formed a partner- 
ship with J. D. Donovan, which continued for three years, Mr. Dacy 
again becoming sole owner of his business, continued as such until his 



:>::<; HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

death, being (lien recognized as the leading man in handling agricultural 
implements in the county. 

In 1869 Mr. Dacy married Lucinda Donnelly, a daughter of Neill 
Donnelly, now deceased, and they became the parents of four children, 
namely: Charles F., Albert E., Alice B. and George H., who, with his 
widow survived him. Mr. Dacy met his death August 1, 1896, when he 
was struck by a train at his home depot, and died soon thereafter. 
Stricken clown in the very prime of his usefulness, he was mourned by 
the whole community, and it was a long time before his place was filled. 
He had always taken an active part in public matters, and had been one 
of the promoters of the County Fair Association, doing much to make 
the annual meetings a success. St. Mary's Catholic church held his 
membership, and it was from its portals that his remains were carried 
to their last resting place in Calvary Cemetery. Years have passed 
since Mr. Dacy died, but the results of his upright life remain, and have 
their influence on the life of the region in which he spent the greater 
portion of his useful and honorable career. 



JAMES DAVIS. 



.lames Davis, one of the progressive farmers of Coral Township, 
is located four miles west of Huntley, and was born one-half mile north 
of his present farm, April 4, 1861, a son of David L. and Elizabeth 
(Williams) Davis, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work. 
After attending the local schools, James Davis worked on his father's 
farm for eighteen months, leaving his rural surroundings for Chicago, 
where he was engaged in conducting a milk route for eight years, secur- 
ing his milk from his old home neighborhood, and handling from twenty- 
five to thirty cans daily. He had three wagons and sold at retail, his 
place of business being at No. 25 Pierce street, opposite to the old fire- 
marshal Sweeney. 

After clearing up a few thousand dollars, Mr. Davis bought his 
present farm in 1894, then known as the Thomas Williams farm, which 
contained 160 acres of land, for which he paid $65 per acre. On 
it were buildings in fair condition, but since taking possession of the 
property he has rebuilt and enlarged the buildings and has everything 
in fine condition. He erected a silo, and operates a dairy, milking 
about thirty cows. Adding to his farm he now has 200 acres in one 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 537 

body, ami eighty-three acres three miles distant on the State road in 
McHenry County, once known as the William Barket farm for which 
he paid $125 per acre. On this property also Mr. Davis rebuilt the 
original buildings, and erected a silo as well as put in other improve- 
ments. The smaller farm is now being operated by his son Walter. 
On both farms the cattle are high-grade Holstein, and Mr. Davis owns 
a full blooded bull. On the homestead he has a fine supply of water 
for the house and premises, from a fifty-five foot well, operated by a 
windmill. All of the basement of the barn is arranged for stabling. 

When he was twenty-one years old Mr. Davis was married to Dora 
Mackeben, a sister of Henry Mackeben, a sketch of whom appears else- 
where in this work. Mr. and Mrs. Davis became the parents of the 
following children: Maggie, who is Mrs. William Lowe, lives one mile 
south of Harmony, and has no children; Walter, who is on the farm 
in McHenry County, married Anna Eckman, and they have one child, 
Ruby; David M., who is living at home, was married to Marie Bourreau, 
but she died, leaving him with one son, James Henry; and Henry H., 
who is at home. David and Henry are assisting their father in oper- 
ating the homestead. Mr. Davis is a Republican, but has never sought 
office, his private affairs absorbing all of his time. For a number of 
years he has been active in the Methodist Episcopal church of Harmony, 
which is located one mile west of his farm. An excellent farmer, Mr. 
Davis has devoted himself to agricultural labors all his life, and is glad 
that his sons are following in his footsteps, for he believes that the 
natural way for a man to earn his living is from the soil. 



THOMAS DAVIS. 



Thomas Davis, one of the progressive farmers of Coral Township, 
is profitably engaged in conducting his father's homestead, where he 
has spent practically all his life. He was born on his present farm, 
September 20, 1868, a son of David L. and Elizabeth (Williams) Davis. 
David L. Davis was born in Abrothwith, Wales, March 16, 1835, and 
died March 22, 1915. His wife was born in Wales, February 22, 1837, 
and died October 22, 1908. They were married in New York, when 
he was twenty-four years old and she was twenty-two. 

When David L. Davis brought his family to McHeary County he 
was accompanied by his brother, William. Soon after his arrival, 



.-).•{* HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

David L. Davis secured the farm now occupied by his son, Thomas, 
then principally in the timber. He built a log house, which he replaced 
with the one now standing, about 1S72, and cleared off his original 
forty acres. To this he added until he owned 420 acres, and he also 
owned 100 acres in Lyon County, Iowa. For a number of years he was 
one of the extensive farmers of this region, keeping from forty to fifty 
cows, and making a specialty of dairying. For the last decade of his 
life he lived in retirement, renting his homestead of 100 acres to Thomas 
Davis. Always a Republican, he never neglected exercising his right of 
suffrage, and was chosen by his fellow citizens to serve on the school 
board. He was one of the original members of the Harmony Methodisl 
church, and lived to be its oldest surviving member. Very hospitable, 
Mr. Davis enjoyed entertaining his friends, and his home was often- 
times a gathering place for delightful social events. His remains arc 
laid to rest at Harmony, two miles away from his old home, four and 
one-half miles due west from Huntley, in Coral Township. He and his 
wife had the following children: Mary, who died at the age of seventeen 
years; David, who died at the age of sixty-four years, at Marengo, to 
which he had retired from his farm, and there his widow who survives 
him, is still living; George, who left McHenry County thirty years ago, 
lives at Dennison, Iowa; William, who lives on a portion of the home- 
stead, is written up elsewhere in this work; Sarah, who died at the age 
of eighteen years; James, who lives on a farm adjoining that of Thomas, 
is also written up elsewhere in this work; Katie, who lives on the old 
homestead, devoted her life to her parents; Thomas, whose name heads 
this review; and Mary, who is Mrs. George Ilemmcr. 

Thomas Davis lives in the house in which he was born, and has 
devoted himself to agricultural pursuits. He was married December 
30, 1902, to Emma Kahle, a daughter of William and Elizabeth (Mc- 
kaben) Kahle, she being a sister of Henry Mckaben. Mr. Kahle died in 
January 1917, aged seventy-one years, and she, February 17, 1908, and both 
were born in Germany. Mrs. Davis was born on the State road October 
13, 1884. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Davis are as follows: 
Sarah, Mary, Margaret, Lester, George, David, Frances, all of whom 
arc at home, and two, who died in infancy. When he married, Thomas 
Davis took over the homestead where for seventy years his family had 
lived. Here he carries on dairying, keeping from twenty-four to twenty- 
five cows, and he owns stock in the new creamery at Harmony. Mr. 
Davis belongs to the old Harmony Methodist church with which his 
father was connected for so many years, but Mrs. Davis was reared in 



HISTORY OF McIIENRY COUNTY 539 

the Harmony Lutheran church. During the years Mr. Davis has been 
conducting his farm, he has proven himself an excellent farmer and has 
always been a public-spirited citizen, although like his father he has not 
aspired to political preferment. 



WILLIAM HENRY DAVIS. 

William Henry Davis, who belongs to one of the old and highly 
respected families of McHenry County, was born in a log cabin, in 
Coral Township, one-half a mile distant from his present farm, February 
4, 1859, a son of David L. and Elizabeth (Williams) Davis, a sketch of 
whom appears elsewhere in this work. 

William Henry Davis was reared in his present township, and here he 
was married, at the age of twenty-seven years, to Ellen Hand, a daughter 
of Louis Hand, of Lake County, 111., but later widely known in McHenry 
County. Both Mr. and Mrs. Hand are deceased. After his marriage, 
William Henry Davis moved to his present farm five and one-half miles 
from Huntley, and for twenty years was connected with a threshing 
outfit, commencing with horsepower, but later buying a steam outfit. 
At the death of his father he secured eighty acres of the homestead, 
and now operates 120 acres. On his property he has erected a barn, 
3G x 80 feet, and a silo, and has put in considerable tiling, thus redeem- 
ing what was formerly almost worthless land. Mr. Davis has also 
cleared off the timber on his land with the exception of about fifteen 
acres. When he began farming only a small part of the land had been 
plowed, but he now has it in magnificent condition, this of course en- 
tailing an immense amount of labor and careful planning. He has a 
well thirty-one feet deep, fitted with a windmill and so has a fine supply 
of water for all purposes. Dairying is his specialty, and he keeps from 
fifteen to twenty cows, of a high grade strain. His barn is admirably 
fitted for dairy purposes, having a cement floor, modern stanchions and 
other appliances, which bring it up to the requirements of the state 
regulations. Mr. Davis has, all in all, one of the best-kept farms in 
McHenry County, and his careful supervision shows that he takes a 
pride in his property. A solid Republican, he gives a hearty support 
to his party, but has never held any office except that of school director. 
He was on the board for thirty years, as was his father, both doing much 
for the cause of education in this region. 



.".Ill HISTORY OF McIIKNRY COUNTY 

Mr. and Mrs. Davis became the parents of the following children: 
Vivia, who is Mrs. .John Thompson of McHenry County, has the fol- 
lowing children: Neil, Vivia, Helen and Melvinc; Pearl and Sylvia, both 
of whom arc at homo, have taught school in their home district; and 
Leonard, who is at home. The Harmony Methodist church was estab- 
lished by a few faithful men and women in the neighborhood, of whom 
Mr. and Mrs. David L. Davis were two, and William Henry Davis is 
one of its members. He belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America. 
On February 20, 1907 Mrs. Davis was taken from her family, since 
which time Miss Pearl has been the housekeeper. 



PROF. HARRY A. DEAN. 

Prof. Harry A. Dean, superintendent of the schools of Crystal Lake, 
is one of the thoroughly efficient and scholarly educators of McHenry 
Count}-. He was born in Massachusetts, July 29, I860, one of the nine 
children born to Otis and Annista (Dunlar) Dean. Otis Dean, born in 
Massachusetts, was a shoemaker by trade. He later became a manu- 
facturer of shoes, and going to California, there rounded out his life, 
dying in 1910. His wife survived him until 1914. 

Harry A. Dean was graduated as a civil engineer, from Ames College 
in 1891, but immediately after his graduation he began teaching school 
at Geneva, 111., where he remained for two years. Leaving Geneva, 
for the subsequent ten years he was superintendent of schools at Etbur, 
111., and for eight years he was superintendent of the schools of Kane 
County. In 1910, Prof. Dean came to Crystal Lake, where he has 
since remained, having charge of the schools of that city. He is a mem- 
ber of the National Educational Association, and of the state and local 
educational organizations. There are sixteen teachers and 500 pupils 
under Prof. Dean's supervision, in the grade and high schools. 

Professor Dean was married to Miss EvaE. Riplits, and they have the 
following children: Revere E., who lives at Chicago; Harry A., who is 
an ex-service man; and Beatrice A., Dorothy I., Jennie V., and Ruth, 
all of whom are at home. The family residence is at Crystal Lake. 
Professor Dean is a Mason. His political affiliations are with the Repub- 
lican party. He and his family are members of the Congregational 
church. 



HISTORY OF McHBNRY COUNTY 541 

JOHN F. DE YARMOND. 

John F. Dc Yarmond, now living retired at Marengo, was formerly 
actively engaged in farming, and is regarded as one of the representative 
men of the county. He was born at Ada, Kent County, Mich., March 
11, 1S50, a son of Alexander F. De Yarmond, born near Halifax, Nova 
Scotia, but of French Huguenot stock. In 1834 or 1835, he came to the 
then territory of Michigan and participated in the "Buckeye War," 
which was a dispute over a strip some six miles wide claimed by Ohio 
and Michigan. The controversy was settled by Michigan being given 
what is now the Upper Peninsula, Ohio retaining the other strip. By 
trade he was a blacksmith. 

In 1866 John F. De Yarmond joined his uncle, George W. Richard- 
son, a farmer of Riley Township, who at that time had rented his farm 
and gone to the "Oil Regions" of Pennsylvania. For three years Mr. 
De Yarmond operated the old Josiah St. John Farm in connection 
with his brother-in-law, John B. Hoof, and then bought an interest 
in a set of abstracts of Eau Claire County, Wis., in partnership with 
Charles B. Swift, and spent a year at Eau Claire. Returning to 
McHenry County he was at Marengo for a time, then went on his 
uncle's farm for several years. Once more coming to Marengo, he con- 
ducted a real estate business until 1893, when on June 28 of that year, 
he was married to Ida Austin, a daughter of Rufus A. and Charlotte 
Austin, of Woodstock. 

Mr. Dc Yarmond inherited an interest in his uncle's farm, and also 
administered his estate. In 1914 he was made one of three commissioners 
of the Coon Creek Drainage District in Riley and Marengo townships 
of McHenry County, and extending into Boone County, and con- 
structed about four miles of main channel, dredged and laid a number 
of miles of tile. This enterprise affects 7,000 acres of farm land, render- 
ing it fit for tillage. Much of this acreage is already under cultivation. 
Mr. De Yarmond is still on the commission. He owns a small tract 
in this district. The service Mr. De Yarmond and his associates have 
rendered to their counties and state in this reclamation project cannot 
easily be overestimated. The lands redeemed were formerly in part 
almost utterly worthless, but now are among the most fertile in this 
region. The long period that the soil lay idle, combined with the 
fertilization of the swamp growths, was productive of a richness that 
yields banner crops and amply compensates for the time and trouble 
and expense involved in the proper draining. 



542 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

In 1911 Mrs. De Yarmond made an extended tour of Europe, visiting 

the various places of interest in France, Italy, Germany, Belgium, 
Holland, England and Scotland, and having been over much of the ground, 

later the scene of the World War. she lias naturally been able to follow 
the course of events more comprehensively and intelligently than the 
majority of people. 



A. G. DICKERSON. 



A. G. Dickerson, secretary of the Alden Mutual Fire Insurance 
Company, is one of the energetic business men of McHenry County, 
who resides at Hebron. He was born in Seneca Township, December 
1, 1868, a son of Silas and Clarissa (Dilley) Dickerson. Silas Dickerson 
was born near Ypsilanti, Mich., and came to Illinois in 1837, being then 
ten years of age. His parents entered land from the government in 
Seneca Township, and there his father died while still a young man. 
In 1905 Silas Dickerson located in Hebron Township, where he died 
at the age of seventy-seven years. His widow survives and makes her 
home with her son. 

A. G. Dickerson learned to be a carpenter, and worked at his trade 
until January, 1918, when he was made secretary of the Alden Mutual 
Fire Insurance Company, which was organized in 1S74 to place risks in 
Alden Township. The business has been so expanded that the town- 
ships of Alden, Hebron, Richmond, Burton and McHenry are included 
in its territory, and associated with Mr. Dickerson is James H. Twney, 
who is president; Arthur D. Cornne, who is vice president; and II. G. 
Street, E. L. Kingsley, H. G. Derkec, all of Alden, and E. G. Turner 
and Jesse B. Richardson of Richmond, who compose the board of direc- 
tors. The company now has 500 policy holders of $1,800,000 insurance, 
at a cost of about one percent for a five year period. Mr. Dickerson 
has charge of the new business and the adjustment of all sma'l losses. 
The cost of operation in 1918 was $300. This is a constantly growing 
business, and during 1918 about $460,000 worth of insurance was placed, 
there being no assessment for that year. 

Mr. Dickerson was married when twenty-nine years of age, to Elva 
Douglas, a daughter of Edwin and Clara Douglas of Hebron. Mr. and 
Mrs. Dickerson have two children, namely: Mary, who was graduated 
from the Hebron High School in 1917, is head of the selling force of the 
Weaver store at Hebron; and Raymond, who is at home. Mr. Dickerson 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 543 

is a Mason and is present master of the Hebron Lodge. He is a man 
well qualified for his position, and under his watchful supervision the 
volume of business has greatly increased. 



ARLIE A. DEITZ. 



Arlie A. Deitz, junior member of the well known grocery firm of 
Kappler and Deitz, extensive dealers in staple and fancy groceries at 
Woodstock, is one of the enterprising business men of McHenry County. 
He was born in Seneca Township, McHenry County, May 25, 1875, a 
son of Albert A. and Olive (Waterman) Deitz, who had six children. 
Albert A. Deitz was born in Albany, N. Y., and there learned the trade 
of a cabinetmaker and carpenter, and followed that calling until his 
death which took place in 1902, his wife having passed away in 1877. 

After attending the grade and high schools of McHenry County, 
Arlie A. Deitz secured the position of rural mail carrier out of Wood- 
stock, and held that position until 1900, when he began clerking in 
a grocery. Having learned the business, he took the position of manager 
of a grocery house at Ridefield, in 1910, and held it until 1913, when 
he formed his present partnership, and since then he and Mr. Kappler 
have built up a fine trade, and stand well with their customers, not only 
on account of the quality of their goods, but because of their fair prices 
and excellent and cheerful service. 

In 1898, Mr. Deitz was married to Blanche Jacket, a daughter of 
Charles Jacket of Seneca Township. Mr. and Mrs. Deitz have two chil- 
dren, namely: Arlie and Eldred A. The family belong to the Presby- 
terian church. In politics, Mr. Deitz is a Republican. The family 
residence is maintained at No. 329 North Madison Street, Woodstock. 
A sound business man, Mr. Deitz has known how to make his efforts 
pay, and at the same time his principles are such as to prevent him 
ever taking advantage of another, and in this way he has built up 
a well-deserved reputation for integrity and fair dealing. 



WILLIAM DESMOND. 



William Desmond, one of the prosperous farmers of McHenry 
County, is an honored resident of Woodstock, and one of the substantial 



544 HISTORY OF MrllENRY COI'XTY 

men of his locality. He was born at Haitian d, 111., .July I, I S 10, a son 
of Cornelius ami Hannah (McEniiy) Desmond, natives of Ireland, 
where the former was horn in 1701), and the latter in 1811. The father 
was a farmer, who came to Illinois in 1836, and was employed in the con- 
struction of the old Illinois & Michigan Canal. He came to Mcllenry 
County in .lime, IN3S, and took up a government claim on section 29, 
Haitland Township, where he remained until his death, February 8, 
1871, with the exception of one year which was spent on a farm in 
Rock Island County, that he bought in 1866. The mother came to 
the United States in 1843, landing at Syracuse, X. Y., from whence 
she came to Chicago, and in 1844, to Haitland Township. In 1850 
the father was appointed one of the first judges of elections in Haitland 
Township, and he also served as a commissioner of highways for several 
3'ears. 

William Desmond attended the district schools of his native town- 
ship, and two years at the Harvard High School. His first work was 
done on his father's farm, and after completing his studies, he taught 
in the district schools of the county for twelve years, when he resumed 
his farming. He now owns 200 acres of land on sections 29, 31 and 32 
Haitland Township, and his home at No. 845 Clay Street, Woodstock. 
In politics Mr. Desmond is a Democrat, and he served as assessor of 
Haitland Township from 1877 to 1891; as supervisor from 1891 to 1912, 
during which time he was chairman of the board for three years, and 
in 1902 was elected by a large majority representative in the lower 
house of the State Assembly, and he served as a member and clerk of 
the board of review for seventeen years. His fraternal connections are 
with the Ancient Order of United Workmen, and the Catholic Order 
of Foresters. Mr. Desmond belongs to the Catholic church. 

On June 6, 1876, Mr. Desmond was married at Harvard, 111., to 
Margaret Nolan, born in Hartland Township, October 9, 1848, a daughter 
of Thomas and Margaret Nolan, the former born in Ireland in 1800, 
and the latter born in Ireland in 1818. Mrs. Desmond attended the 
district schools of the county, and the AVoodstock and Harvard High 
Schools, and for fifteen years taught schools in the McHenry County 
schools. Mr. and Mrs. Desmond became the parents of the following 
children: Cornelius C, who was born May 25, 1877; Thomas H., who 
was born March 31, 1879; William W., who was born September 24, 
1880; Daniel H., who was born March 21, 1882; John J., who was born 
July 31, 1885; Margaret E., who was born February 24, 1887, and 
May !•;., who was born May 11, 1890. 



HISTORY OP McHENRY COUNTY 545 

JOHN C. DIENER. 

John C. Diener, one of the retired residents of Harvard, has a record 
of having been successful along two widely diversified lines, that of 
farming and railroading. He was born in Germany, February 4, 1853, 
one of seven children, of whom five survive. These parents, John and 
Catherine Diener, were born in Germany, which they left in 1856, 
coming to the United States, and after their arrival in this country, 
they located at Fond du Lac, Wis., where the father died in 1914, having 
been a cabinetmaker by trade. 

John C. Diener was but a small child when his parents came to the 
United States, and he consequently was reared here, and attended the 
public schools of Wisconsin. When he was thirty-eight years old, he 
came to McHenry County, and has made this county his home ever 
since. His farming was done in Wisconsin between the ages of twelve 
and twenty-two. For five years he was occupied with selling pumps, 
lightning rods and agricultural implements, and then for thirty-three 
years he was connected with the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad, 
commencing as a laborer, and advancing to the position of roadmaster. 
On March 1, 1912, he retired, being at that time held in the highest 
esteem by all who were associated with him. 

On March 31, 1878, Mr. Diener was married to Miss Delia M. Brown, 
a daughter of Pearson Brown, and a member of a pioneer family of Fond 
du Lac County. Mrs. Diener died December 13, 1919. Their two 
children are: Winifred J., who is Mrs. F. B. Saunders of Chicago; and 
Wayne R., who lives at Harvard. Politically Mr. Diener is a Repub- 
lican, and he has served Harvard as a member of its city council, being 
elected three consecutive terms. Fraternally he belongs to Harvard 
Lodge No. 309, A. F. & A. M., and Harvard Camp No. 86, M. W. A. 
For some time Mr. Diener has been a prominent member of the Men's 
Club of Harvard, and has always taken an active part in any movement 
having for its object the promotion of the prosperity of Harvard, and 
the advancement of its people. 



ALBERT BLODGETT DIGGINS. 

Albert Blodgett Diggins, now deceased, was one of the most prominent 
and wealthy men of Harvard, and was held in the highest esteem all 



546 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

over McIIcnry County. He was born in McHenry County, January 
23, 1854, a son of Franklin and Ellon (Rlodgott) Diggins, who had throe 
children. Franklin Diggins was one of the pioneers of McHenry 
County, and became a farmer hero upon an extensive scale. 

Albert Blodgett Digging was reared on his father's farm, and attended 
the local schools. In 1881 he went to Hersey, Mich., and for some 
time conducted a large dry goods store, later branching out into the 
lumber business, with headquarters at Cadillac, Mich. In 1894, he 
returned to McHenry County and resumed his farming activities, con- 
tinuing them until he retired in 1908, and lie then lived in retirement 
at Harvard until his death which occurred February 6, 1916. When he 
diod he owned 150 acres of valuable farm land in McHenry County; 
a large amount of land in Texas; a number of lots at Harvard, as well 
as his residence, and his interest in the Cummer Diggins Lumber Com- 
pany of Cadillac, Mich. Mr. Diggins also had a large amount of money 
loaned out on gilt-edged mortgages. 

On December 28, 1875, Mr. Diggins was married to Emma J. Johnson, 
and they became the parents of the following children: Stella E., who 
is the wife of John McFadden, one of the prominent men of Harvard; 
Frank A., who is supervising his mother's interests, married Erne Udell; 
and Ralph C, who is a veteran of the World War, enlisted in the aviation 
branch of the service, July 3, 1917. The family belong to the Methodist 
Episcopal church. Mr. Diggins was a staunch Republican. He was 
a Mason and belonged to the Modern Woodmen of America. Mrs. 
Diggins survives her husband, and lives at the old home in Harvard, 
where she is surrounded with every comfort and luxury. She enjoys 
the respect and affection of her associates to whom she has endeared 
herself by her many excellent traits of character. 



WILLIAM EDWIN DIKE. 

William Edwin Dike, formerly one of the prosperous farmers of 
Dorr Township, is now living in practical retirement at Crystal Lake. 
He was born at Ogdensburg, St. Lawrence Count} - , X. Y., October 11, 
1861, a son of Abial and Olive (Manley) Dike, who were married in 
Vermont. In 1862 they came to McHenry County, 111. Abial Dike 
bought a small farm one-half mile from Crystal Lake, and conducted 
it for a time, but became crippled by rheumatism. In 1867 or 1868 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY :»47 

he sold this farm and bought a large tract of prairie land in Greenwood 
Township, which continued to be his place of residence until he retired 
and moved to Woodstock, where he died, surviving his wife, who passed 
away in January, 1910, having been born in 1829, while he was born 
in 1828. She was educated at a ladies' seminary at Pittsford, Vt., and 
was a consistent member of the Congregational church for a number 
of years. He was a successful farmer, and during his life owned several 
large farms, and had bought and sold considerable real estate. Abial 
Dike was one of the original directors of the McHenry County Fair, 
and superintendent of the horse department of it, for years. At one time 
he was extensively engaged in breeding both road and farm horses, and 
was among the first to introduce Merino sheep into McHenry County, 
and raised and bred on a large scale sheep, cattle, hogs and horses. 
He was reared in the Congregational church, and was a liberal contributor 
to it. A very strong Republican. Mr. and Mrs. Dike had the following 
children: Minnie, who lives at Zion City, 111.; William E., whose name 
heads this review; Elizabeth Adelia, who is Mrs. B. V. Morris of Park 
Ridge, 111.; and Abbie J., who is Mrs. Peter B. Johnson of Zion City, 111. 

William E. Dike was reared and educated in McHenry County. 
When he was twenty-two years old he took charge of a farm near Crystal 
Lake for his father. Later he returned to the home place, and when 
his father retired, he took charge of the old farm. The father disposed 
of his real estate before his death, and in 1903 W. E. Dike bought the 
farm of Albert Morse which contained 133 acres of land to which he 
later added the Olmstead farm of 120 acres, and called his property 
Sunshine Farm. Here he ran a dairy farm, and had a herd of Jersey 
cows, shipping milk to Chicago for eighteen years. 

He made other improvements on his property, remodeled the house 
and barns, and then sold it to James Tate in April, 1919, and moved 
to his present residence at Crystal Lake, which is one of the most pleasant 
and comfortable homes in McHenry County. He is a faithful supporter 
of the Republican party. 

On February 10, 1904, Mr. Dike was married to Clara Ashton of 
Crystal Lake, a daughter of T. H. and Huldah (Chase) Ashton, natives 
of Medina, N. Y. They came to Illinois in 18.55, and ten years later 
located at Crystal Lake, and owned and conducted the Crystal Lake 
Hotel until Mr. Ashton's death. He was widely known among traveling 
men. His death occurred May 19, 1891, when he was seventy-five 
years old. In recent years Mrs. Ashton went to live with Mr. and 
Mrs. Dike and died at their home February G, 1909, aged ninety years. 



548 HISTOKY OP McHENRY COUNTY 

Both Mi. and Mrs. Ashton were consistenl members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. Mrs. Dike was born at Barringtori, 111., September 
Hi, L858. She was educated in a girls' school at Crystal Lake, and was 
a kindergarten teacher at Blue Island, near Chicago, prior to her mar- 
riage, and she had also taught at Woodstock. Mrs. Dike had three 
sisters, namely: Cornelia, who was Mrs. William Morris, is deceased; 
and Miss Amanda Jane Ashton; and Sarah Patience Ashton Nash, both 
o!' whom are living with Mr. and Mrs. Dike. The two brothers, Lewis 
II and L. Chase Ashton, are residents of Ogden, Utah. Mr. and Mrs. 
Dike belong to the Presbyterian Church. 



LOUIS DIMMEL. 



Louis Dimmel, who is successfully engaged in farming on his fine 
rural property four and one-half miles west of Woodstock in Seneca 
Township, was born in Alsace, France, September 23, 1847, a son of 
Louis and Eliza Dimmel, who in 1848 came to the United States, and 
bought property one mile east of the present homestead of their son, 
of which he still owns a portion. Here Louis Dimmel, the elder, died, 
his widow surviving him until 1910, when she too passed away being 
then about eighty-four years old. The grandfather, John Dimmel, 
had come with the family to Me Henry County, and he died at an 
advanced age. The elder Louis Dimmel had served for seven years in 
the French army, Alsace at that time being under French rule, as it is 
at present, hut for over forty-five years it belonged to Germany. His 
children were as follows: Louis, whose name heads this review; George, 
who lives in Winnebago County, 111., is engaged in farming; ami Cather- 
ine, who died in young womanhood. 

Louis Dimmel, the younger, was only fifteen years old when his father 
died and upon his young shoulders fell the burden of operating the farm 
as his brother was only four years old at that time. Later, about 
1867, he sold the homestead of 100 acres and purchased his present 
farm, but still later bought fifty-five acres of the homestead left by his 
father, and has 175 acres of land, on which he has erected his present 
buildings, except the barn, which he has recently remodeled. His land 
is all in the famous Kiswaukee Prairie. Mr. Dimmel has always car- 
ried on dairying and keeps from thirty-five to forty cows, selling his 
milk to factories. His cattle are high-grade Ilolstein. He is a Demo_ 



HISTORY OP McHENKY COUNTY 549 

crat in his political beliefs. St. Mary's Catholic church of Woodstock 
holds his membership, and his is one of the oldest families in the parish. 
In 187S Mr. Dimmel was married to Lizzie Barbien, of McHenry 
County, a daughter of Nicholas Barbien, of French origin. Mrs. 
Dimmel died in 1900, leaving the following children: Lena, who is Mrs. 
William Desmond of Hartland Township, has five children, Dorothy, 
Arthur, Marguerite, Donald and Eleanor; George, who is assisting 
his father on the farm; Kate, who is Mrs. Jerry O'Connor of Newark, 
N. J.; Louis, who is a millwright of Chicago; Mary, who is connected 
with the selling force of one of the large mercantile establishments of 
Chicago; Paul, who is also assisting his father; Helen, who is keeping 
house for her father and brothers; and Madeline, who took a commercial 
course, is now employed in an office at Elgin. Mr. Dimmel has every 
reason to be proud of his family, and they and he deserve the confidence 
they inspire in their associates. 



GEORGE A. DODD. 



George A. Dodd, who has served as mayor of Algonquin, is an 
extensive farmer of Algonquin Township, and stands high among the 
representative men of McHenry County. He was born in Algonquin 
Township, July 4, 1869, one of the five children of his parents, George 
E. and Roselle (Ford) Dodd. George E. Dodd was born in New York 
state, but came to Illinois in June, 1844, and located in Algonquin 
Township, wJiere he remained until his death, October 14, 1914. 

George A. Dodd attended the common and high schools of his native 
township, and was reared on a farm, putting to practical use in after life 
the knowledge he gained during his formative period. His farm of 
107 acres of choice land shows the effect of his fostering care, and half 
of it is within the city limits of Algonquin. 

On August 28, 1901, Mr. Dodd was married to Miss Elizabeth 
Rosencrantz, a daughter of Albert A. Rosencrantz, a prominent man of 
Crystal Lake. Mr. and Mrs. Dodd have one daughter, Miss Gladys, 
who is now attending the Elgin High School. Mr. Dodd is a Republican, 
and was elected mayor of Algonquin in 1916, and gave his city a wise and 
constructive administration. Fraternally he belongs to the Modern 
Woodmen of America. He and his family belong to the Congregational 
church. 



550 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

WILLIAM A. DODGE. 

William A. Dodge, proprietor of the Oakenwall Farm, ono mile 
north of Ringwood in McHenry Township, is one of the aggressive 
fanners of the county, and a man who holds the respect and trust of 
his neighbors. He was born at Johnson, Vt., June 5, 1851, a son of 
Amos and Sarah N. (Ritterbush) Dodge, both of whom were horn in 
Vermont. In 1872 he went to Massachusetts where he worked in 
various occupations. 

In the spring of 1873 William A. Dodge and his brother Erwin 
Dodge, came to Illinois, and spent some time in McHenry County, 
but later rented their farm and went to Nebraska and conducted a 
stock business on government land. Still later they bought 380 acres 
of land in Waller County, Nebr., on which he was engaged in farming 
for five years, and then returned to McHenry Count} - , his brother 
Erwin, who had accompanied him to Nebraska, remaining on their land 
in that state. The brothers continued to work together for sixteen 
years, and then William A. Dodge took the farm in McHenry County 
while Erwin took the one in Nebraska, which he still owns. 

Subsequently William A. Dodge moved to Ringwood, and rented 
his farm, but in 1903 went to Alaska, and upon his return resumed the 
operation of his farm, and is still so engaged. In recent years Mr. 
Dodge has added twenty acres to his original farm, and is engaged in 
carrying on dairying, handling forty-five cows. Earlier in life he did 
considerable feeding of cattle, sheep and hogs, both in Nebraska and 
McHenry County. The present residence was standing when he took 
charge of the farm, but he has rebuilt it. 

On September 24, 1884, William A. Dodge was united in marriage 
with Nellie L. Rea, of Ord, Nebr., born at Knoxville, Iowa, but taken 
to Nebraska when six years of age, and reared on the prairie. She was 
eighteen years old at the time of her marriage. Her father built the 
first frame house and first hotel at Aurora, Nebr., and was a very promi- 
nent man of that region. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dodge became the parents of the following children: 
Rea Arthur, who died at the age of twenty-eight years, had lived at 
home and operated the farm, and his widow, formerly Ada Westlake, 
now Mrs. George Simpson of Beloit, Wis., bore him a daughter, Mildred 
Rea who survives her father; Lora, who married George L. Bacon of 
Antioch, 111., a railroad mail clerk, has one daughter, Georgia Irene; 
Agnes Ethel, who was a school teacher in McHenry Count}', entered 






HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 551 

the government service as reconstruction aid at Camp Grant, Des 
Moines, Iowa, Atlanta, Ga., and Oteen, N. C; Elynor E., who is attend- 
ing school at Antioch, 111.; Leon E., who is at home; Sarah Jane, who is 
attending school at DeKalb, 111.; anil William, Jr., who is deceased. Mr. 
Dodge is a Republican, but has never taken any active part in politics, 
his private affairs absorbing his time and attention. 



GEORGE E. DOLBY. 



George E. Dolby, who owns one of the best garages and repair shops 
in this part of McHenry County, is one of the leading business men of 
Huntley. He was born at Elgin, 111., August 2, 1892, one of the eleven 
children of his parents, George W. and Mary (Grice) Dolby. George 
W. Dolby was born at London, England, where he was reared and taught 
the trade of a tinsmith. In 1880, he came to the United States, and 
located at Elgin, 111. 

George E. Dolby was brought up at Elgin, and attended its schools 
and Grant Academy. In 1914 he embarked in his present business, 
and has built it up to gratifying proportions, and carries a stock of 
$2,500 worth of goods. 

Mr. Dolby was married September 18, 1915, to Miss Florence E. 
Hill, a daughter of Charles Hill of Elgin, 111. Mr. and Mrs. Dolby have 
one daughter, Muriel F., who was born November, 1917. Both Mr. 
Dolby and his wife belong to the Lutheran church, in which they are 
active. His political convictions make him a Republican. Alert, 
expert and enterprising, Mr. Dolby has made a success of his under- 
taking, and stands exceedingly well in his community. 



CHARLES H. DONNELLY. 

Charles H. Donnelly, circuit judge of Woodstock, was perhaps more 
widely known and deeply loved than any other member of the bench. 
In his official capacity he was competent, able, well informed, firm, yet 
kindly, just, yet merciful; in private life, a loyal, kindly, sympathetic 
friend, with his heart open to every call of need. Intensely human, 
Judge Donnelly had characteristics which make comrades of men of 



552 BISTORT OF McHENRY COUNTY 

all classes ami creeds, repelling none befriending all. Judge Charles 
II. Donnelly was born at Woodstock, August 22, 1855, one of the ten 
children of his parents, .Will and Mary (McElroy) Donnelly. Neil! 
Donnelly was born in County Deny, Ireland, May 12, is Hi, and came 
to the United States in 1S2S. For many years he was a very successful 
merchant of Woodstock. 

Charles II. Donnelly attended the graded and high schools of Wood- 
stock, and Notre Dame University, from which he was graduated in 
L873. He then entered the law office of Slavin & Smith, and in due 
course of time was admitted to the bar, January 8, 1877. He was 
elected city attorney of Woodstock for seven consecutive years, and in 
1S90 was elected county judge of McHenry County, and served until 
June, 1897, when he was elected to the circuit bench, to which he was 
re-elected in 1903, in 1909, and in 1915. He also served as captain 
of Company G, Third Regiment of the Illinois National Guards for 
six years. 

On May 2, 1888, Judge Donnelly was married to Miss Nina C. 
Blakleslee, a daughter of Gervase and Helen R. Blakleslee, and their 
children are as follows: Mary, whose husband, H. L. Webster, was 
discharged August 12, 1919, from serving the United States army 
during the World War; and Helen, who has completed her studies at 
Boston, Mass. Judge Donnelly was a Mason of high standing, belonging 
to Calvary Commandery, K. T., and the Mystic Shrine, Medinah 
Temple. In the Odd Fellows, he was past noble grand of the Grand 
Encampment. In politics he was a staunch Republican. 

It would be impossible to overestimate Judge Donnelly's services 
on the bench. His knowledge of the law was very well founded, and his 
rulings have been just, while his personal honor and unblemished 
integrity give unquestioned assurance of perfect equity to all parties 
concerned. He died December 27, 1921. (See pages 143-144). 



PAUL J. DONOVAN. 



Paul J. Donovan, attorney-at-law of Harvard, is a man whose 
genial traits, devotion to domestic demands, and recognized ability, 
have won for him deep appreciation and friendship among a wide 
circle in McHenry County and throughout the northern part of the 
state. He was born at Woodstock, March 19, 1890, a son of John 
Donovan, president of the McHenry County State Bank of Woodstock. 



HISTORY OF McIIENRY COUNTY 553 

After being graduated from the Woodstock High School in 1907, 
he became a student of the law school of Notre Dame University, from 
which he was graduated in 1910, following which he entered the office 
of David R. Joslyn, and the next year was admitted to the bar of Illinois, 
it being impossible for him to take his examination earlier as he had not 
attained to his majority when he completed his collegiate courses. He 
remained with Mr. Joslyn as assistant states attorney for four years, 
and then formed a partnership. with Judge E. H. Waite, this association 
continuing until Mr. Donovan opened an office at Harvard in November, 
1918, this city having been his place of residence since 1912, he having 
been united on June 19 of that year to Miss Lillian Keating, a native 
of Harvard, and a daughter of John and Hannah Keating. Mrs. 
Donovan was educated at Harvard, and for two years prior to her mar- 
riage was engaged in teaching in McHenry County. There are no 
children of this marriage. 

As assistant states attorney Mr. Donovan was placed in charge of 
some important litigation involving the collection of back taxes from 
tax-dodging men and estates. One of these cases was the County vs. 
the Barber Estate, which was ably contested, but a final decision was 
reached whereby $60,000 in back taxes were recovered for the village 
of Crystal Lake. Mr. Donovan's study of assessments and the taxing 
systems as practiced generally during this and other litigation, made 
him an expert on a subject which has attracted the attention of some 
of the ablest men of the profession. When Lake County endeavored 
to collect back taxes from the Richard W. Sears Estate, Mr. Donovan 
was chosen as the prosecutor, the decision of the case yielding the 
county some $92,000. The village of Oak Park, in Cook County, also 
made an effort to collect over $1,700,000 in back taxes from the same 
estate. Mr. Donovan represented the prosecution in this case as well, 
and it is still in court. 

The attorney general of Illinois called upon Mr. Donovan to represent 
the State in the case State vs. Durand for the dissolution of an injunction 
granted by the Circuit Court to restrain the State from destroying 
a fine herd of cattle infected with the foot and mouth disease. This 
case was carried to the Supreme Court, where the injunction was dis- 
solved, the right of the State being held supreme. The financial loss 
to the owner was reimbursed by action of the legislature. All of these 
unusual experiences have been of inestimable advantage to a rising- 
young attorney of Mr. Donovan's abilities, and he is now recognized 
as one of the distinguished members of the bar of the state. In politics 



554 HISTORY OF McIIENRY COUNTY 

ho is a Republican, differing in his views from his father who is chairman 
of the McHenry County Democratic Central Committee. 

Mr. Donovan is a close student, going into every phase of a case 
and understanding it thoroughly before he takes it into court. His 
field is not overcrowded as arc some of his profession, for too few men 
understand the complicated details of the laws governing assessing and 
collecting of taxes, especially when they have been persistently dodged, 
so that in this, Mr. Donovan has ample opportunity to prove his capa- 
bilities, and win for his clients a fair and equitable decision. His 
removal to Harvard is regarded by that city as a decided acquisition, 
and the loss is correspondingly felt at Woodstock. 



EDWARD DUFFY. 



Edward Duffy, now deceased, was for many years a prosperous 
farmer of Grafton Township, and one of the well-known men of McHenry 
County. He was born in Ireland, November 1, 1839, a son of James 
and Elizabeth Duffy. James Duffy died when his son Edward was a 
small child, and in 1851 he was brought to the United States by his 
mother when he was twelve years old. He attended school in this 
country, and became a farmer. 

On October 26, 1878, Edward Duffy was married to Nellie J. Barry, 
who was born in Ireland, March 19, 1855. She was brought to the 
United States by her parents, James and Nellie (Hill) Barry, and they 
located at Hartford, Conn. Later, the parents returned to Ireland, 
where they died. Mr. and Mrs. Duffy became the parents of four 
children, namely: Mae E., who is deceased; James A., who manages the 
home farm; Estelle R., who is also on the home farm; and Edward G., 
who is at home. 

The home farm contains 145 acres of land, and here general farming 
and dairying are carried on. Mr. Duffy died on this farm, August 7, 
1912, and he is survived by his three children and his widow, who con- 
tinue on the farm he left to them. He was a Democrat, and was elected 
road commissioner and school director. For many years he was a con- 
sistent member of the Catholic church. A man of fine character and 
good habits, he was regarded as one of the most desirable citizens of 
the county, and his death was deplored by all who knew him. 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 555 

ALAN J. DUFIELD. 

Alan J. Dufiold is a veteran of the World War, and one of the sub- 
stantial men of Woodstock who put to good use a natural inclination 
for mechanics, and proved that he understands the requirements of his 
trade. He conducted a first-class general machine shop, and did all 
kinds of electrical and mechanical work. Mr. Dufield was born in 
McHenry County, June 1, 1892, a son of John A. and Ada M. (Jewett) 
Dufield, who became the parents of three children, two of whom survive. 
John A. Dufield was a very prominent man in McHenry County, and 
active in Democratic politics. He served as postmaster of Woodstock 
for eight years, and was also the editor of the McHenry County Dem- 
ocrat. He sold the Democrat in 1901, later engaged in the stationery 
and job printing business, continuing in it until his death, March 17, 
1907. 

Alan J. Dufield attended the Elgin and Dixon academies, but pre- 
ferring to follow his natural bent, learned the trade of a machinist, 
and bought his shop from E. G. Griebel. His equipment was modern 
and he did all kinds of general machine work, armature winding and 
electrical work, and made a specialty of the latter. In 1918 Mr. Dufield 
sold his business, and enlisted in the United States Ambulance service 
with the French army as a mechanic. He was honorably discharged 
in 1919. 

Mr. Dufield was married to Miss Marie E. Mentzer, a daughter of 
Henry Mentzer. They have one son, Alan Curtis Dufield, born June 
24, 1920. Fraternally he belongs to the order of Elks. His political 
views make him an independent voter. A fine workman, he had built 
up a large and valuable trade, and he stands well with his associates 
and in his community. 



NEILL C. DUNHAM. 



Neill C. Dunham, owner of one of the finest farms in Coral Township, 
is numbered among the enterprising young men of McHenry County. 
He was born in 1884 on a farm adjoining his present property. His 
grandfather, Artemas Dunham was one of the most distinctive figures 



556 HISTORY OP McHENRY COUNTY 

in the early history of McHenry County. When be was fourteen years 
old, this remarkable personage was the owner of a team, ami with his 
horses began to he self-supporting, and from the little money he was 
able to make, saved enough to enter land from the government in 1836, 
which property is now owned by his grandson, Neil! C. Dunham. Dur- 
ing the early period referred to, Artemas Dunham's father and brother 
frequently hauled wheat to Chicago and were glad to get fifty cents B 
bushel for it. One dollar per day was considered good wages, but then 
the purchasing power of a dollar was much greater than it is today. 
While developing his land Artemas Dunham worked at whatever he 
could find to do. He bought and sold farms, owning at one time 800 
acres of land, and handling in all about 1,000 acres. The homestead 
contains 197H acres, nothing having been added since his demise. He 
had given one tract of land to his son, but owned when he died about 
300 acres. He traded three times, one of the farms having been at 
Union, and from it he took enough land to donate the site for the Meth- 
odist church, although he and his wife belonged to the Presbyterian 
church at Marengo, to which he was a liberal contributor. He died 
at Marengo, having retired to that village six years previously. For 
some years before moving to Marengo, he had not taken any active 
part in the farm management, renting it to a tenant, and living on the 
farm in a second set of buildings. He occupied himself with caring 
for his garden. His widow survived him and passed away at the home 
of her son at Marengo. 

Neill C. Dunham was graduated from the Marengo High School, 
and then took a three years' course in the agricultural department of 
the University of Illinois. He then was travelling salesman for the 
American Radiator Company, selling rad'ators, boilers, etc., and then, 
after three years with that concern, spent two years in California, 
handling automobiles. In 1914 he took charge of the old farm. Mr. 
Dunham specialized on growing and feeding pure bred Hampshire hogs, 
shipping largely for breeding purposes, and he also operated a dairy. 
Since becoming the owner of the farm, he built a silo, laid cement floors 
in his barns and modernized his house, putting in hot and cold water, 
and gasoline lights. 

Mr. Dunham was married in 1900. He votes the Republican ticket, 
and was elected a member of the first community school board. He 
belongs to Marengo Lodge No. 138, A. F. & A. M., and to the Sigma 
Alpha Epsilon Greek Letter Fraternity. 




b^^tM-H C}juJ* 



HISTORY OF McIIENRY COUNTY 557 

HARVEY G. DURKEE. 

Harvey G. Durkee, supervisor of Alden Township, and one of the 
most extensive farmers of this section, is held in the highest esteem all 
over McHenry County. He was born in Alden Township, September 
20, 1866, one of the two children of George F. and Betsy (Stewart) 
Durkee. George F. Durkee was born in New York, later going to Ver- 
mont, and then coming to McHenry County, his parents locating in 
Alden Township. He became one of the prosperous farmers of this 
region, dying here in 1888, his wife having passed away in 1887. 

Harvey G. Durkee attended the local schools, and learned farming 
from his father. When he attained his majority, he began farming, and 
now owns 347 acres in Alden Township and twenty-seven acres in Hebron 
Township. Here he carries on general farming and stock raising, and 
is very important in the agricultural life of his community. 

Mr. Durkee was united in marriage with Miss Mary Lordon, who 
belongs to one of the pioneer families of Alden Township. Mr. and Mrs. 
Durkee have the following children: George L.; Edward J., married 
Elizabeth Bailey, and they became the parents of the following children: 
Paul, Mary, Harvey, Francis and Mark; Harry D., who is a veteran 
of the World War as a member of Company A, Fifty-eighth, Fourth 
Division of Regulars, and was in France for nearly two years; Agnes 
M., and Vincent J. The family belong to the Catholic church. In 
politics he is a Republican, and served as assessor of the township before 
he was elected supervisor in 1917, and has been very valuable to his 
township in both offices. He is a charter member of Hartland Court 
No. 224, C. 0. F., and also belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America. 
His family is an old one in this section as is evidenced by the fact that 
his father hauled grain to the lakes and Kenosha before a railroad was 
built. His mother oftentimes saw deer to the extent of fifteen at a time, 
feeding in the timber about their place. Mr. Durkee is a man of more 
than usual capabilities, and he has devoted his talents to practical uses, 
and his present prosperity shows what a man can accomplish if he is 
willing to work and save. 



CHARLES E. DYGERT. 

( 'harles E. Dygert, a retired farmer of Algonquin, belongs to one of 
the pioneer families of McHenry County, and is one of the oldest living 



538 HISTORY OF MfcHENRY COUNTY 

residents of this county. He was horn in Algonquin Township, Novem- 
ber 19, 1840, a son of Henry P. and Laura (Peck) Dygert. Henry 
P. Dygert was horn in New York state in 1814, and died in 1898. His 
wife died in April, 1863. They were among the pioneer settlers of Mr- 
Henry County, where their five children were horn. 

Charles E. Dygert attended the district schools, and was given a 
practical knowledge of farming by his father, and he was engaged in 
farming until his retirement. During the Civil War, he was one of 
those who responded to his country's call, enlisting in July, 1861, and 
serving until September 23, 1864, as a member of Company II, recruited 
at Woodstock. 

Mr. Dygert was married to Miss Lucina Lucas, who died at Algon- 
quin May 13, 1917. The family residence on North Main Street, 
Algonquin, is owned by Mr. Dygert, and he owns two other houses in 
that village, but sold his 160 acre farm in Algonquin Township, and 
another farm of the same area in South Dakota. In politics he is a 
Republican. He belongs to the local G. A. R. It is related that C. P. 
Barnes, now one of the most prominent attorneys of the country, when 
a law student, went to Mr. Dygert for assistance, and the latter paid 
him $5 for a pig he possessed, a big price in those faraway days. With 
this $5 the ambitious lad was able to secure necessary books to prosecute 
his studies. During the years he has lived, Mr. Dygert has seen remark- 
able changes take place, not only in his native county, but the nation, 
and as an old and patriotic soldier, has followed the late war campaign 
with expert knowledge and enthusiasm. 



HENRY EARLE. 



Henry Earle, postmaster at Hebron, is one of the suhstantial men 
and prominent citizens of McIIenry County, and prior to his appoint- 
ment to his present office in 1908, he was extensively engaged in farming 
and stockraising. He was born in Alden Township, October 6, 1851, 
one of the four children of his parents, Henry and Sarah Jane (Paul) 
Earle, natives of England, who came to the United States in 1850, and 
located in Alden Township. There he developed a fine farm, and died 
in 1872. The mother survived the father many years, dying in 1905. 

Henry Earle, Jr., was reared on his father's farm, and attended the 
local schools. Having been reared to agricultural pursuits, he naturally 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 559 

followed them after attaining his majority, and was very successful 
as a farmer and raiser of good stock. When he was appointed post- 
master of Hebron in 1908, he moved to that village. Mr. Earle has one 
assistant and two mail carriers under his supervision. 

On October 31, 1S76, Mr. Earle was united in marriage with Miss 
Ella F. Mansfield, a daughter of Hollis and Cynthia J. (Mason) Mans- 
field, and a member of a very prominent McHenry County family. 
Mr. and Mrs. Earle became the parents of the following children: Mary 
M., who married Frank O'Brien, who is superintendent of the Chicago 
and Northwestern Railroad; Florence E., who is the widow of Thomas 
Cox; and Charles F., who lives at Harvard, 111. Mrs. Earle died June 
11, 1914, having been a devoted wife and mother. The family are 
members of the Protestant Episcopal church. In politics Mr. Earle 
is a Democrat, and he has been very active in local affairs. Under his 
intelligent supervision, the affairs of the post office are ably conducted, 
and he is rendered efficient assistant by Mis Verna E. Welbon. 



ERNEST V. EASTMAN. 

Ernest V. Eastman, dealer in furniture and undertaker of Wood- 
stock, is one of the substantial business men of McHenry County, and 
a man who is held in high esteem by all who know him. He was born 
in Winnebago County, 111., December 3, 1880, one of the eight children 
of his parents, Henry W. and Eliza (Wilson) Eastman. Henry W. 
Eastman was born in New York state, but he came to Illinois in 1845, 
where he continued to reside until his death in 1913, having been engaged 
in farming all of his active years. 

Ernest V. Eastman attended the graded and high schools of Rock- 
ford, 111., and took a commercial course in a business college. He then 
embarked in a furniture business and in order to fit himself as an under- 
taker, took a special course in the Barnes Embalming School in 1905. 
In 1913, he located at Hebron, 111., and from there came to Woodstock 
in 1915, forming a partnership with F. C. Slavin, under the firm name 
of Slavin & Eastman. The business is located at No. 122 Main Street, 
and No. 360 Tryon Street, Woodstock, and here is carried a fine stock 
of furniture worth about $7,000, and a full equipment of undertaking 
apparatus, including a $10,000 auto hearse. 

On June 19, 1907, Mr. Eastman was married to Miss Iva Moore, 



560 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

ami they have two children, namely: Vernon M. and Everton V. Mr. 
Eastman and his family belong i" the Methodist Episcopal Church. 
Fraternally he is a Mason, Odd Fellow and Elk. In politics ho is a 
Republican. Mr. Eastman is a skilled embalmer, and every funeral 
entrusted to him is conducted with dignity and impressiveness that 
honors the deceased and reflects credit upon the living. Personally, 
he possessed those qualities which make him well fitted for his calling, 
and his customers look upon him as a friend as well as a highly trained 
pi ofessional man. 



HOWARD D. EATON. 



Howard D. Eaton, M. D., one of the leading physicians and surgeons 
of Harvard, and a man widely known all over McHenry County, is an 
honor to his profession. He was born in Bound Brook, N. J., February 
10, 1S7S, one of the two children of his parents, James D. and Gertrude 
(Pratt) Eaton. James D. Eaton was a noted minister of the gospel, 
and for years was prominent in the Congregational church. 

Howard D. Eaton attended the graded and high schools of Mont- 
clair, N. J., and Beloit Academy, and then matriculated at Beloit 
College, from which he was graduated with the degree of B. A. in 1900. 
Following that he took a medical course at the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, Chicago, 111., from which he was graduated in 1904 with the 
degree of M. D. Immediately thereafter, Doctor Eaton went to 
Chihuahua, Mexico, where he was engaged in practice for seven years, 
Kin I hen returning to the United States, on account of disturbed political 
conditions, spent three years in Shopiere, Wis., still continuing his prac- 
tice of medicine. In 1915 he came to Harvard, where he has since 
remained, building up a large practice. He served as secretary of the 
McHenry County Medical Society from 1920 to 1923, and is a member 
of the Illinois State Medical Society and the American Medical As- 
sociation. 

In 1904 Doctor Eaton was married to Miss Katherine Ingleby, 
a daughter of John Ingleby, and they have three children. Fraternally 
Doctor Eaton belongs to the Masons and Loyal Order of Moose. In 
politics he is an independent voter. lie and his family belong to the 
Presbyterian church. As a man and a physician Doctor Eaton stands 
very high, and he is a decided addition to Harvard, and McHenry 
County. 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 561 

i 

In August, 1918, in response to his country's urgent call for physicians, 
he accepted a commission as first lieutenant in the Medical Corps, and 
after four months' service in the army, was honorably discharged, 
December 21, 1918. After his discharge he was offered a commission 
as captain in the Medical Reserve Corps for a period of five years, which 
lie accepted, so that in case of another national emergency his country 
could again have the benefit of his services. 



EBEL BROTHERS. 



Henry Carl Ebel and Clarence Joseph Ebel, proprietors of Ebel 
Brothers Garage of Algonquin belong to one of the old families of 
McHenry County, and are numbered among Algonquin's most repre- 
sentative younger business men. They were born in Algonquin Town- 
ship, Henry C, February 2, 1875, and Clarence J., November 13, 1896, 
two of the five children of Joseph and Katherine (Deuchler) Ebel, the 
former of whom is engaged in farming upon an extensive scale in Algon- 
quin Township. 

Henry C. and Clarence J. Ebel were reared on a farm, and attended 
the district schools. They embarked in their present business at 
Algonquin under the firm name of Ebel Brothers. When Clarence J. 
was called to the colors during the World War, he sold his interest in 
the business, but after his return to Algonquin he again entered into 
partnership with his brother, Henry C. They carry a stock valued 
at $10,000. In addition they do an extensive business in trucking and 
moving and give taxi service by day and night. 

On December 21, 1912, Henry C. Ebel was married to Miss Hazel 
Rahn, a daughter of Charles Rahn, and they have three children, 
Charles, Gladys and Norman J. Clarence J. Ebel was married, Septem- 
ber 14, 1921, to Miss Irma B. Ritt, daughter of Carl J. and Mary Ritt 
of Crystal Lake, 111. They are members of the Lutheran church. In 
politics they are Republicans. Thoroughly understanding the business 
in every detail, they are able to render expert service, and their garage 
is largely patronized by people from a wide territory. 



JOSEPH EBEL. 



Joseph Ebel, whose farm is conveniently located four miles east of 
the village of Algonquin, in Algonquin Township, was born in Branden- 



562 HISTORY OF McIIENRY COUNTY 

burg, Germany, about sixty miles from Berlin, June 23, 1842. He 
served the necessary three years in the German army, and participated 
in the Prussian-Austrian War of 1866, and, being stationed in Luxem- 
burg, was in none of the battles. 

In 1868 he came to the United States and for a time worked at 
Dundee, 111., receiving $20 per month for two seasons. He then bought 
a farm of 100 acres that he still owns, on which was a log house and 
stable, and that primitive dwelling still stands and is used as a summer 
kitchen. The land was covered with stumps, and it was hard work 
to get them grubbed out. In order to get the land, for which he paid 
$40 per acre, he had to go into debt for it, and for his horses, implements 
and everything necessary to engage in farming, but he was given twenty 
years in which to clear off this indebtedness. Since then he has paid 
off everything, erected the present buildings, and his original one cow 
is now replaced by a fine herd of twenty. He assisted in organizing a 
creamery near him. Later Mr. Ebel bought sixty acres of land where 
he now lives, still later adding sixty acres more across the road, paying 
for each more than $60 per acre. He conducts this last farm, and his 
first one is operated by a son, Otto. For years he has produced milk, 
and has kept as many as seventy-five cows. 

Mr. Ebel was married (first) to Mary Eckert, also born in Germany, 
who died ten years later, having borne him four children, namely: Albert, 
who lives near Algonquin; Anna, who is Mrs. Fctland Hager of Nebraska; 
Emma, who is Mrs. William Madden of Sioux City, Iowa; and Herman, 
who lives on a farm near his father. In 1883, Mr. Ebel was married 
(second) to Kate Denchler, a native of Baden, Germany, a widow with 
one child, Emil Denchler of Aurora, 111. Mr. and Mrs. Ebel became 
the parents of the following children: Henry, who lives at Algonquin; 
Otto, who is on the old farm; Elsie, who is Mrs. Joseph Hart, of Chicago; 
Clarence, who is a veteran of the World War, was sent to France, but 
returned, and is with his brother Henry in a garage at Algonquin; and 
Theodore, who is engaged in farming on the old homestead. Mr. 
Ebel is a member of the Lutheran church at Barrington, one of its officers, 
and is now one of the oldest members. This church is five miles distant 
from his home. Politically he is a Democrat, but he takes little or no 
part in politics. He is a very hard worker, never sparing himself, and 
his wife is equally ambitious for their success, her efforts having aided 
him in getting ahead and coming to a place where his money would 
work for him. 



HISTORY OP McHENRY COUNTY 563 

GEORGE ECKERT. 

George Eckert, ex-sheriff of McHenry County, is a man who has 
taken a very active part in local affairs, and is also held in high esteem 
on account of his being a veteran of the Civil War, both at Woodstock, 
where he resides, and throughout the county. He was born in Franco, 
February 24, 1841, a son of Henry and Elizabeth (Hartlett) Eckort. 
Henry Eckert was born in Alsace, France, where he was engaged in 
farming until his death. Following that sad event, his widow, with 
her small family, embarked for the United States, and died at Chicago, 
111. The children after her death, separated and made their own way 
in the world. 

Being but a small child when he was brought to the United States, 
George Eckert had attended school but a short time in France, and he 
supplemented what educational training he had there received by 
attending school at Queen Ann, 111. Until 1859, he was engaged in 
farming, but in that year entered employ of the A. W. Fuller & Company 
concern, later going with Fuller & Sherwood, with whom he continued 
until May, 1862, when he enlisted in defense of his country in Company 
F, Ninety-fifth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and served during the Civil 
War until August, 1865, when he was honorably discharged, and returned 
home. He then became associated with the firm of Fillback & James, 
selling dry goods, groceries and other merchandise, leaving that firm to 
go with I. T. and A. L. Solsbery with whom he remained until 1886, 
when he was elected sheriff of McHenry County, and so capable an 
official did he prove that he was re-elected to the same office in 1894. 
For the following two terms he was deputy sheriff under M. W. Lake, 
and Sheriff Wandrack, and then on December 7, 1914 he was appointed 
truant officer by Hon. D. T. Smiley, now county judge of McHenry 
County. For twelve years, Mr. Eckert served as a member of the city 
council of Woodstock, and in every way has taken a deep and intelli- 
gent interest in the progress of his city and county. He belongs to 
Woodstock Post No. 108, G. A. R. 

Mr. Eckert was married to Miss Amy Green, a daughter of Robert 
Green, and a member of one of the pioneer families of McHenry 
County. Mr. and Mrs. Eckert had one child Georgia C, who is at 
home. Mrs. Eckert is dead and is buried in the cemetery at 
Queen Ann, 111. Mr. Eckert and his daughter belong to the Presby- 
terian Church, and their pleasant home is at No. 340 S. Madison Street. 
A man of enterprise, Mr. Eckert long ago invested quite heavily in 



564 HISTORY OP McHENRY COXJNTY 

North Dakota farm lands, and their increase in value proves the wisdom 
of his investment. 



GEORGE F. EC'KERT. 



George F. Eckert, junior member of the well established lumber 
firm of Hall & Eckert of Woodstock, 111., has fairly earned the reputation 

I QJoys for honorable dealing; and uprightness of character. He was 

horn February 14, 1864, one of the eight children of his parents, Michael 
S. and Lena (Stoltz) Eckert, natives of France, who came at an early 
day to the United States. The paternal grandparents were Harry and 
Elizabeth (Herdklotz) Eckert, who were born in the central part of 
France, but died at Paris, France. 

George F. Eckert attended both the graded and high schools, and 
when still a young man embarked in a lumber business with W. D. Hall, 
maintaining this association for twenty years. On January 1, 1907, the 
firm of Hall & Eckert was organized, and a complete stock of lumber, 
coal, sash doors, blinds, lime, cement, stucco, hair, building paper and 
similar supplies has since been carried. Mr. Eckert is also a director 
of the Farmers Exchange State Bank of Woodstock, and is a man of 
large interests in the county. 

In 1888 Mr. Eckert was married to Miss Louise Wilber, a daughter 
of Joseph Wilber of Crystal Lake. Mr. and Mrs. Eckert have four 
children, namely: Wilbur D., who is a veteran of the World War, was 
on the battleship "Kansas"; Helen L., Ralph T. and Walter H., all of 
whom are at home. Mr. Eckert and his family belong to the Presby- 
terian church. Fraternally he is a Mason, while in politics he is a 
Republican. A man of sound principles, lie can be counted upon to 
give his hearty support to all movements calculated to be of benefit 
to his community or country, and is rightly numbered among the most 
representative of McHenry's best element. 



DANIEL E. ECHTERNACH. 

Daniel E. Echternach, a rural free delivery carrier of Marengo, and 
owner of the Kiswaukee Stock Farm, is one of the best-known men of 
McHenry County. He was born at Reamstown, Lancaster County. Pa., 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 565 

August 30, 1866, a son of Samuel H. and Susannah (Fry) Echtemach, 
both of whom were reared in Lancaster County. The paternal great- 
grandfather of Daniel E. Echtemach came to the American Colonies 
from France, while the maternal great-grandfather came to this country 
from Germany. Samuel Echtemach and his wife came to Illinois in 
1869, locating first at Naperville, DuPage County, where he was engaged 
in veterinary work, although he had been a coachmaker in Pennsylvania, 
and then, after about fifteen years, he moved to Boone County, 111. 
In 1888 or 1889, he came to McHenry County, and spent two years on 
a farm in Coral Township, from whence he moved to Marengo, and 
there lived retired until his death April 8, 1898, when he was under 
seventy years of age. His widow survives him and makes her home at 
Marengo. Their children were as follows: Christian F., who lives at 
Painesville, Ohio, is a traveling salesman; Fanny, who is Mrs. Charles 
Green of Chili, Wis.; Anna, who is Mrs. Frank Morris of Aurora, 111.; 
Clara, who is Mrs. John A. Chase of Denver, Col.; Daniel E., whose 
name heads this review; Henry, who is a farmer of Marengo Township; 
and Wallace, who is a farmer of Riley Township. 

Daniel E. Echternach was twenty years old when he came to 
McHenry County, and prior to that had been graduated from the Elburn 
High School in Kane County, 111. He became a mechanic with the 
McCormick Harvester Company, but after three years went with the 
Terry Manufacturing Company of New York, as a traveling salesman, 
covering Illinois, Iowa, Wisconsin and Minnesota, handling their hard- 
ware specialties. Later Mr. Echternach went on the farm of his father- 
in-law for two seasons, in 1900 becoming a rural free delivery mail car- 
rier and one of the first in the county. He has held this position con- 
tinuously ever since. His associates are: Mrs. Ina Coonrad of Route 1; 
Roy Thomas of Route 2; and Lee Grover of Route 3; Mr. Echternach's 
route is No. 4. Route 5 is now discontinued There have been a 
number of men in this service since 1900, but Mr. Echternach is the 
only one who has continued. He is a member of the Carriers' Associa- 
tion, and has been a delegate several times to the state conventions, and 
has always been active in organization matters. 

On November 29, 1897 Mr. Echternach was married to Ethel M. 
Pringle, who was born in Marengo Township, on the river road. Mr. 
and Mrs. Echternach have one son, Malcolm Gerald, who was born 
May 31, 1899, was graduated from the Marengo High School in 1918, 
is now at home, and is a very intelligent young man. Mr. Echternach 
has rendered faithful service to his community during twenty-one years, 



566 HISTORY OK McIIKXRY COUNTY 

and has enjoyed his work. Fond of horses, he in former years took a 
pride in driving a good road horse on his trips, but an automobile now 
lias replaced the horse. As he possesses a genial nature, he has made 
warm friends all along his route. 



EDWARD EDDY. 



Edward Eddy, one of the highly esteemed residents of Woodstock, 
is a retired farmer of Seneca Township. He was born in that township, 
t hree miles southwest of Woodstock, January 24, 1848, a son of James, 
and Louisa (Weeks) Eddy. James Eddy was born near Newark, N. Y. 
in 1807, but was taken to Steuben County, Ohio when fifteen years old. 
On April 20, 1845, he was married, his wife being a widow. On October 
1, 1846 they came overland to McHenry County, and settled on the 
Kishawaka Prairie, Seneca Township. James Eddy secured govern- 
ment land on the prairie and here he lived until his death in 1888, at 
the age of eighty-one years. His wife died in 1886, aged seventy-two 
years, having been born in 1814. A cooper by trade, James Eddy was 
handy with his tools and made many things, including ox yokes, cradles 
and similar articles. The last ox yoke he made is in the possession of 
his son Edw-ard, and is in good condition although over fifty years old. 
He was a strong Republican, and served on the school board. Prior to 
his marriage with the mother of Edward Eddy, James Eddy was mar- 
ried to Lorena Wilcox, who died in New York. Their children were as 
follows: Alonzo, who during the Civil War, went to Nebraska where he 
died at the age of seventy-six years; and Homer, who also went to 
Nebraska, and died there in 1877. By her first marriage, the second 
Mrs. Eddy had a daughter, Emma, who married Henry Palmer, and 
in 1855 went to Bear Creek, Iowa, where she died in April, 1916, aged 
eighty-three years, having been born in 1833. By his second marriage 
Mr. Eddy had three children, namely: Lorena, who married James 
Mitchell, lives at Carpenterville, Kane County, 111.; Julia, who married 
John Donley, a stone mason, is now a widow of Woodstock; and Edward, 
who was the youngest. 

Edward Eddy remained on the homestead, and bought it in 1877, 
but gave his parents a home with him until their death. He added to 
the original farm and erected new buildings, making the property a 
very valuable one. Here he carried on dairying and hoggrowing, milk- 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 571 

stock December 7, 1855, and when eighteen years of age began teaching 
in the local schools of McHenry County. For fifteen years she con- 
tinued in the educational field, seven years of which she taught in the 
Woodstock school, the remainder of that time being in the country 
districts, on account of her health, which necessitated her residing 
amid rural surroundings. Since her marriage she has diverted her 
talents to social and club work, and for eight years has been recorder 
of the local camp of the Royal Neighbors. Mr. and Mrs. Ellsworth 
have no children. They reside in the northern part of Woodstock, 
where Mr. Ellsworth erected a comfortable house, and every summer 
take an outing on the lakes of Wisconsin. Both the Ellsworth and 
Lemmers families are exceptionally well known in McHenry and adjoin- 
ing counties and their representatives stand for all that is best and 
highest in community welfare work and good citizenship. 



M. F. ELLSWORTH. 
Page 134. 

ALVIN J. EPPEL. 



Alvin J. Eppel, secretary and treasurer of the Woodstock Implement 
Company, incorporated, is recognized as an important factor in the 
business life of Woodstock, and McHenry County. He was born in 
McHenry County, June 8, 1875, one of the four children of his parents, 
Jacob and Catherine (Koch) Eppel, natives of Germany and the United 
States. He came to this country in his youth, and became a farmer 
of McHenry County. 

Alvin J. Eppel attended the local schools of McHenry County, and 
the Woodstock High School. Until 1903, he was engaged in farming, 
but in that year became associated with Fred G. Bosshard in his present 
business, which is the handling of farm machinery, gasoline engines, 
wagons, carriages, automobiles, tires and supplies, and doing well work. 

On September 29, 1903, Mr. Eppel was married to Miss Liza Nail, 
a daughter of Charles Nail of McHenry County, who was born in Ger- 
many. Mr. and Mrs. Eppel have one daughter, Helen A. Mr. Eppel 



572 HISTORY OF .M.liKXUY COUNTY 

is a Republican in his political convictions. The Lutheran church of 
Woodstock holds his membership and that of his wife and daughter. 
The Eppel residence on Dacy street, Woodstock, is a very comfortable 
one, and here the many friends of the family enjoy gathering upon 
numerous occasions. 



HENRY T. EPPEL. 



Henry T. Eppel, one of the prosperous farmers of Greenw I 

Township, owns and operates 247 acres of valuable land on section 34. 
He was born in Seneca Township, February 16, 1868, a son of Jacob 
and Catherine (Koch) Eppel. Jacob Eppel was born in Alsace Lor- 
raine, France, and came to the United States when he was twenty-two 
years of age, and after stopping in Ohio for a year, came to Illinois, ami 
located in Hartland Township, McHenry County. After living there 
for thirteen years, he moved to Seneca Township, and became the 
owner of 200 acres of land. There he died when seventy-one years 
old. His wife survives him, being now seventy-seven years old. Sin- 
was born in Racine County, Wis. Their children were as follows: 
Henry T., Alvin J., William J. and Fred R., all of whom are still living. 

Henry T. Eppel attended the local schools in Hartland Township, 
and learned practical farming from his father, so thoroughly that he 
was able to make a success of his own farming from the very beg innin g. 
He was married to Rose Mclntyre, born March 14, 1875, in New York 
state, a daughter of A. Mclntyre. Mr. and Mrs. Eppel have the fol- 
lowing children: Irvin H., who was born June 4, 1897; Florence, who 
was born November 22, 1898, is a teacher; and Ida, who was born 
August 7, 1902. In politics Mr. Eppel is a Republican, but he has 
not had the time or inclination to seek public office, his work on the 
farm occupying his attention, but he has always taken an intelligent 
interest in local affairs, and given his support to those measures he deemed 
best for the community and its people. 



EDWARD J. FARDY. 



Edward J. Fardy, senior member of the hardware firm of Fardy & 
Yick of Hebron, is one of the well known business men of McHenry 




&. (isjLAJL^-- 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY- 573 

County, where his ability is appreciated. He was born on a farm in 
Wisconsin, August 18, 1883, one of six children of William and Alice 
(Goodman) Fardy. 

Edward J. Fardy was reared on his father's farm, and he attended 
both the common and high schools of his locality, being graduated from 
the latter in 1901. He then learned the trade of a tinner and plumber, 
and gained a practical experience which has stood him in good stead in 
his present undertaking. On March 11, 1916, he and Chris Vick organ- 
ized their present business, which is the handling of a general line of 
hardware, gasoline engines, and pumps, and the carrying on of plumbing 
and repairing. An extensive patronage has been built up, and both 
partners are accepted as skilled workmen and experienced in their line. 

Mr. Fardy was married to Miss Jennie C. Howie, a daughter of 
DeWitt Howie, and a member of a prominent Wisconsin family. Mr. 
and Mrs. Fardy have one daughter, Grace E., who was born November 
23, 1907. The Fardy family are Universalists. Mr. Fardy is a Repub- 
lican. Fraternally he belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America. 
Having made his own way in the world, Mr. Fardy deserves all the more 
credit for what he has accomplished, and is worthy of the confidence he 
inspires. 



CHARLES H. FEGERS, M. D. 

Charles H. Fegers, M. D., one of the honored retired physicians of 
McHenry County, is now living at McHenry, and is interested in the 
West McHenry State Bank, which he is serving as president. He was 
born in Germany, but when only four years old was brought to the 
United States by his parents, John H. and Gertrude Fegers, also natives 
of Germany, who located at West Point, Iowa, in 1850. John H. 
Fegers was also a physician, and practiced his profession at West Point, 
Iowa, for a number of years. In 1877, he returned to his native land 
on a visit, and there died. His wife died in Iowa. 

Dr. Charles H. Fegers attended the public schools of Iowa, and then 
embarked in a drug business at Keokuk, Iowa, and was engaged in the 
same line at Burlington, Iowa. He then began the study of medicine 
under Doctor Andrews of Chicago, completing his medical studies at 
the Chicago Medical College, from which he was graduated in 1879. 
He then located at Johnsburg, 111., but four years later came to McHenry, 
where for many years he was engaged in an active practice. In 1911, 



574 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

he retired owing to increasing years, but he still maintains his interest 
in politics, voting independently, and for some years was a member of 
the school board. TTc bad also dealt largely in real estate, having built 
many residences in McHenry and a number of summer cottages. Pro- 
fessionally he long belonged to the county, stale and national medical 
societies, and is still interested in their work. 

In 1880, Doctor Fegers was married to Miss Alice McGee, a daughter 
of Sylvestor McGee, a prominent resident of Woodstock. She died 
some years ago. The family belong to the Catholic church. 



FRANK C. FERRIS. 



Frank C. Ferris, junior member of the grocery house of Schuett & 
Ferris, is one of the enterprising business men of Woodstock, and well 
known throughout McHenry County. He was born at Huntley, 111., 
June 24, 1878, one of the five children born to Theodore R. and Mary 
(Merrill) Ferris. Theodore R. Ferris was a druggist at Huntley for 
thirty years, and he was also postmaster at that place for a number of 
years, being appointed under a Republican administration. He has 
now retired from active life, and is enjoying the comforts his former 
activities have entitled him to. 

Frank C. Ferris attended the graded and high schools of Huntley, 
and completed his studies at the Elgin Academy, and a commercial 
college. He then clerked in his father's drug store, and was associated 
with his father in the post office. Coming to Woodstock, he entered the 
well-known grocery house of A. K. Bunker, with which he continued 
until April 15, 1918, when he and Robert H. Schuett bought the business. 
Mr. Bunker is now deceased. The new firm carry a full and complete 
line of groceries and hardware, and are upholding the old prestige of 
the house. Their stock averages about $6,000. Mr. Ferris, like his 
father, is a strong Republican. His fraternal connections are with the 
Masons and Odd Fellows. A live business man, he has known how 
to forge ahead, and deserves the credit which is accorded him as a 
citizen and a man. 



HOWARD J. FERRIS. 



Howard J. Ferris, one of the substantial business men of Harvard, 
holds the responsible position of superintendent of the Hunt, Helm, 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 575 

Ferris Company, of which his father, Henry L. Ferris, is vice president. 
He was born on a farm known as the Ferris Homestead in Alden Town- 
ship, February 16, 1878, one of four children born to Henry L. and Millie 
F. (Mosher) Ferris. A sketch of Henry L. Ferris is given elsewhere 
in this work. 

Howard J. Ferris was reared at Harvard, 111., and after attending 
its schools, took a business course in the Rockford Commercial college. 
On completion of this course he spent two years in the office of Hunt, 
Helm, Ferris Co., and then took a four year course in mechanical engi- 
neering in the Universitj' of Chicago. Returning to Harvard he 
again entered the employ of Hunt, Helm, Ferris Co., working as drafts- 
man and pattern maker for two years. In August, 1904, he was made 
superintendent and still holds that position although he is devoting 
more and more of his time each year to the experimental department 
in which the devices manufactured by his firm are developed. 

On January 15, 1905, Mr. Ferris was united in marriage to Miss 
Beatrice Gaye, a daughter of William C. and Nancy F. Gaye, and they have 
two children, namely: Robert G. and Beatrice Nan. Mr. and Mrs. 
Ferris are consistent members of the Methodist Episcopal church, both 
serving as teachers in- the Sunday school for years. Politically he is 
a staunch Republican, but does not care for office, preferring to exert 
his influence in favor of his party and civic improvement, as a private 
citizen. He is president of the board of education and a director in 
the Harvard State Bank. The Ferris family is one of the best and 
most favorably known in the county, and Mr. Ferris is a worthy member 
of it, and the principles for which its representatives have always stood. 



HENRY L. FERRIS. 



Henry L. Ferris, vice president of the Hunt, Helm, Ferris Company 
of Harvard, one of the largest concerns of its kind in the United States, 
is accounted one of the most prominent men of McHenry County. 
He was born at Alden, 111., September 24, 1850, one of six children 
born to Sylvanus and Sarah (Brandow) Ferris. Sylvanus Ferris was 
born in Greene County, N. Y., where he spent the early part of his 
life. He died at Alden, 111., where he had located in 1875. 

Henry L. Ferris was reared on a farm in Illinois, and attended its 
public schools. After reaching years of maturity, he entered the cream- 



576 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

cry business, and was so engaged for seven years, interesting himself 

in the production of butter and cheese. Later he obtained several 
patents of so valuable a nature that they justified the organization of 
the company of which he is now vice president, and the plant has been 
expanded to its present proportions, employment being now given to 
about 300 people. Mr. Ferris has been an energetic and tireless worker, 
devoting most of his time for the past forty years to inventing and 
developing the many devices owned and manufactured by his company. 
He is a firm believer in patents as shown by the fact that he has taken 
out over one hundred foreign and United States patents covering the 
devices he has perfected. 

In 1876 Mr. Ferris was married to Miss Millie F. Mosher, a daughter 
of William Mosher. Mr. and Mrs. Ferris became the parents of the 
following children: Howard J., who is superintendent of the above 
mentioned company, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this volume; 
Eugene C, who is at Alden, 111., is manager of H. L. Ferris & Sons 
Dairy Farms of 940 acres, producing last year 350 tons of milk; Bessie I., 
who is Mrs. William Doyle of Harvard, 111.; and Olive C, who is Mrs. 
Samuel May of Rockford, 111. The Ferris family belong to the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church. Mr. Ferris is very active in civic matters as 
a Republican, and has been a member of the city council of Harvard, 
and on its school board. In addition to his heavy interests in the 
Hunt, Helm, Ferris Company, Mr. Ferris owns several valuable farms 
in the vicinity of Harvard, and has the prosperity of this locality close 
at heart, and can be counted upon to render any aid in his power to 
advance it and its people. 



REV. ALBERT A. FISKE. 

Rev. Albert A. Fiske, D. D., one of the honored residents of Har- 
vard, has the distinction of being the founder of Christ Episcopal church 
here, and one of the scholarly men of McHenry County, w^hose labors 
in the ministry and for the uplift of humanity, have endeared him to 
a wide circle of people. He was born in Troy, X. Y., November 1, 1828, 
one of six children born to Allen and Eliza (Chapman) Fiske. Allen 
Fiske was born in New Hampshire, and was graduated from Dartmouth 
College as a Phi Beta Kappa. Originally a farmer, he passed his last 
years as an educator, and specialized as an instructor in literature and 
English grammar. His death occurred in 1877. 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 577 

Albert A. Fisko was reared at Troy, N. Y., and received his pre- 
liminary instruction under his father. Devoting himself to the service 
of the church, he entered Nashotah, Wis., Seminary, and was graduated 
therefrom, being ordained for the ministry by Bishop Whitehouse of 
Chicago. After faithfully fulfilling the duties of several charges, he 
was induced by Bishop McLaren to undertake the work of organizing 
a church at Harvard, and held his first services there in January, 1877. 
From then until 1886, he labored zealously and successfully, and during 
that period the present beautiful church edifice was erected and con- 
secrated. In 1886 he received a call from the church at Austin, 111., 
and left Harvard for Austin, but in 1891 he was recalled to Harvard b} r 
his old parishioners, who felt that he belonged to them. Once more 
he assumed charge of affairs, and continued to minister to them until 
failing health made it necessary for him to permanently retire. 

In 1859 Mr. Fiske was married to Miss Amelia Goodyear, and 
after her demise, he was married (second) to Mary S. Herrick, of Boston, 
Mass. During his youthful days, Mr. Fiske did considerable newspaper 
work, and has contributed some able articles since then to church 
publications. He is a Republican. Fraternally he is a Mason. 



JOHN G. FITCH. 



John G. Fitch, now deceased, was formerly one of the pioneers of 
Crystal Lake, and a man widely known and universally respected. 
He was born at Pawlet, Vt., August 19, 1809, a son of Daniel Fitch, 
born during the American Revolution at Stanford, Conn. John G. 
Fitch was married in Virginia, to Caroline Marlow, a native of Loudon 
County, Va., where Mr. Fitch was engaged in teaching, and where he 
remained for four years. He then returned to Vermont, and in 1839 
came to Illinois, securing land that was located in Crystal Lake, then 
known as Nunda, from the government, and another farm in Algonquin 
Township. It was on the first farm that his wife died in 1854. After 
he was again married, Mr. Fitch went to his other farm, living there 
until he enlisted for service during the Civil War, in Company H, 
Thirty-sixth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, which company was largely 
made up of McHenry County men. His period of service extended 
over three years, but eighteen months of it was spent in the invalid 
corps to which he was transferred after receiving an injury. Later he 



.178 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNT? 

did service guarding government property in the North. After his 
honorable discharge he returned to Illinois, and lived on a farm in 
Livingston County, where he died April 1, 1883. 

By his first marriage he had the following children who reached 
maturity: Mary Jane, who married Edward Barring, of Westfield, 
X. Y.. died on her seventy-third birthday; James II., who left MeHenry 
County in young manhood and went to Texas, where he died in 1880, 
aged forty years; Virginia, who is the widow of Charles H. Cronkhite, 
lives in Washington County, N. Y.; Marlow, who served in the One 
Hundred and Twelfth New York Volunteer Infantry during the Civil 
War for almost three years, *was discharged on account of disability 
from wounds received at the battle of Cold Harbor, Va., and returned 
to the uncle with whom he was living at the outbreak of the war; Walter 
B., who is mentioned at length below; Daniel Edward, who left McHcnry 
County in boyhood, died when about forty-nine years of age in Arizona, 
where he was engaged in sheep herding; and Laura E., who lives with 
her brother, Walter B. 

Walter B. Fitch was born April 3, 1847, on the old homestead, one- 
half a mile north of Crystal Lake, and he has spent his life in this vicinity 
with the exception of his period of service in defense of his country 
during the Civil War. He enlisted for that conflict, in January, 1865, 
in Company K, One Hundred and Fifty-third Illinois Volunteer Infantry, 
and saw duty in Tennessee, not being discharged until September, 1S65, 
following which he in company with his uncle, James W. Marlow, 
established a general store in the old town of Crystal Lake, this partner- 
ship being maintained for sixteen years, death severing these bonds, 
when Mr. Marlow passed away. For the subsequent eleven years 
Mr. Fitch continued the business, and then retired. During the over 
twenty-six years he was continuously in business, he built up a fine 
trade, and was recognized as one of the leading men of Crystal Lake. 
For four years he served as postmaster under the Harrison administra- 
tion; was village treasurer for twenty years and school treasurer, ami 
during the time he held the latter office, the main school building was 
erected. Mr. Fitch belongs to Nunda Post No. 226, G. A. R., and of 
Nunda Lodge, No. 169, A. F. & A. M., which he served as secretary for 
sixteen years. Considering the various relations he has maintained 
with the public, Mr. Fitch is about as well known a man as can be found 
in MeHenry County, and certainly no other man enjoys a greater or 
more deserved popularity, for he has measured up to the highest 
standards in every particular. 






HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 579 

MATTHEW H. FITZSIMMONS. 

Matthew H. Fitzsimmons, one of the prosperous farmers of Nunda 
Township, resides five and one-half miles east of Woodstock, on the 
township line between Nunda and Dorr townships. He was born near 
Auburn, N. Y., March 4, 1843, a son of John and Mary (Riley) Fitz- 
simmons, both of whom were born near Dublin, Ireland. In the fall 
of 1843 Mrs. Fitzsimmons, accompanied by her sistei\ Ann, came to 
Chicago by way of the Erie Canal and the Great Lakes, and went to 
visit Patrick Fitzsimmons who had come west five or six years pre- 
viously, being a pioneer of Nunda Township. Later John Fitzsimmons 
joined them, and entered a large amount of land near Barryville, 111., 
where he died in 1893, aged ninety-one years, having been retired for 
the last twenty years of his life. He was a Democrat. He was a charter 
member of the Catholic church of McHenry, the first services being held 
in the cabins of the early settlers, but later a substantial church edifice 
was erected. His wife survived him, dying when only lacking two 
months of being eighty-six years of age. Their children to attain to 
mature years were as follows: James, who, after having spent twenty 
years at Lake City, Minn., returned to McHenry, where he died at the 
age of seventy-five years; Richard, who, after living in Iowa, Minnesota 
and Kansas, died at Chicago, December 17, 1917, aged eighty-four 
years; Mary Ann, who married Smith Searles, kept a millinery shop at 
McHenry for fifty years, and died at the age of seventy-five years; John, 
who died at the age of twenty-one years, had taught in the home district 
and was a law student; Thomas, who died at the age of twenty-two 
years at Natchez, Miss., while serving in the Ninety-fifth Illinois Volun- 
teer Infantry during the Civil War; Matthew, whose name heads this 
review; William, who was a well known stockman, died unmarried at 
the age of thirty-eight years; and Joseph, who was a storekeeper at 
McHenry for some years, retired, and now lives at Chicago. 

Matthew H. Fitzsimmons was reared on the homestead and with his 
brother William operated it until the latter's death. He then secured 
his present farm which formerly belonged to his wife's parents, and prior 
to that it was owned by Samuel Terwillger, who erected in 1849, the 
residence which is still a landmark, now occupied by Mr. Fitzsimmons. 
Mr. Fitzsimmons has built one of the finest barns in the county. He 
devotes his 300 acres to dairy farming, and his water supply comes from 
natural springs on the farm, from which the water is piped to the house, 
barns and yard. It is his practice to keep a tenant on the farm. He is 



580 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

one <>f the original directors of the former McHenry County State Hank 
at Woodstock, now nationalized, of which he is vice president. Mr. 
Fitzsimmons owns a section of farm land in North Dakota, and another 
section in Kearney, Nebr. He has served as assessor and a member of 
the school board. 

Matthew H. Fitzsimmons was married to Margaret Conley, a 
daughter of William and Anastasia Conley, who settled in McHenry 
County in the early forties, buying their farm some fifteen years later. 
Mr. and Mrs. Fitzsimmons have no children of their own, but they have 
reared James Hanrahan, Mrs. Fitzsimmons' nephew, taking him when 
he was only a child. He has been graduated from Loyola. St. Ignatius 
School, Chicago, and is now studying law. Both Mr. and Mrs. Fitz- 
simmons are members of St. Patrick's Catholic church of McHenry, to 
which the Conley family belonged from its establishment. An expe- 
rienced farmer and good business man, Mr. Fitzsimmons has made a 
success of his undertakings and is justly numbered among the repre- 
sentative men of the county. 



WILLIAM GILBERT FLANDERS. 

William Gilbert Flanders, one of the prosperous and representative 
men of McHenry County, owns a fine farm five and one-half miles 
southwest of Woodstock in Seneca Township, and was born in St. 
Lawrence County, N. Y., near Ogdensburg, March 28, 1867, a son of 
Otis B. and Emily (Kelly) Flanders. The Flanders family was founded 
in this country during Colonial times by four brothers, who located in 
what are now the New England States, and it is now a very large one 
found in practically all of the states of the Union, as shown by a genealogy 
compiled about 1870. 

Otis B. Flanders was born in New Hampshire May 30, 1832, and 
during his childhood was taken to St. Lawrence County. N. Y., and 
reared on a farm. During the Civil War he served in the One Hundred 
and Twenty-first New York Volunteer Infantry, Company F, for four 
years, and participated in a number of important battles. After the 
close of the war he returned to his wife and family, and later brought 
them and his parents to McHenry County, first buying the farm now 
occupied by his son, William G., and later purchasing other property. 
His death occurred March 23, 1909. 



HISTORY OP McHENRY COUNTY 581 

For twenty-nine years William G. Flanders has lived on his present 
farm, and the buildings have been erected by him during the past ten 
years, and are thoroughly modern. On May 26, 1909, he was married 
to Mary L. Allbee, a daughter of Orin Allbee, who was born on the farm 
now owned by James Scott in Seneca Township. She lived with her 
parents and cared for them until they were claimed by death. Mr. and 
Mrs. Flanders have no family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Flanders are earnest, members of the Methodist 
church, and active in carrying on its good works. Both are held in the 
highest esteem in the neighborhood where they have spent their lives. 



ALLEN GILMORE FLEMING. 

Allen Gilmore Fleming, one of the progressive farmers of McHenry 
County, is located five miles northwest of Marengo, in Marengo Town- 
ship. Mr. Fleming was born at Stewarton, Ayrshire, Scotland, March 
16, 1853. In 1S70, in company with an elder brother David, he came to 
the United States, locating in Will County, Illinois. Later he moved to 
Chicago, where he carried on a grocery and meat market business for a 
number of years. In 1880 he came to McHenry County, where he had 
purchased 160 acres of land at $40.00 per acre, from G. N. Chittendon, 
of Plainfield, 111. There was not a building on the farm except a portion 
of a house. The soil was in fair condition, but a number of acres were 
covered with water. The latter obstacle was overcome by laying 900 
rods of tile, which drained it properly and redeemed the greater ^part of 
the land. Later he laid 1,000 rods more, making the entire farm tillable. 
As he could he erected his barn and other buildings, also bought three 
other farms which he sold again later. 

At first Mr. Fleming was engaged in dairying, which he found very 
disastrous, and for three years was merely able to hold his own. At 
present he carries on general fanning and the feeding of steers; he is also 
a cattle and hog buyer, shipping to the Chicago markets. A period of 
forty years has brought about many changes in farming methods, also 
prices. At one time oats sold for fourteen and fifteen cents per bushel, 
corn at twenty-one cents per bushel, and hogs brought $2.75 per hundred 
weight. Considering these facts and a loss of $2,500 one year in feeding 
cattle, his success has been remarkable. 

The Fleming farm is one of the best cultivated farms in that region. 



582 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

It is operated according to modern methods with all the modern 
machinery. Mr. Fleming has always believed in doing everything 
effectively and thoroughly. He has never forgotten the kindness of 
Mr. Chittendon in standing back of him during his early struggles and 
i^ grateful for his friendship and support. 

Mr. Fleming was married June 25, 1S73, in Chicago, to Isabella 
Taylor, also-born in Scotland. They became the parents of the following 
children: Clarence Robert, Alexander Taylor, William Cochran, L. 
[sabelle, Anna Louise, Florence Elizabeth and Alice Lewellyn. Clarence 
died at La Porte, Inch, in 1912 of pneumonia; and Florence died in 
October, 1918, during the influenza epidemic. Of the surviving children 
Alexander lives in Marengo Township, and William in Coral Township, 
both excellent farmers. The daughters have all taken up the teaching 
profession and at the present writing Isabelle and Anna are in the 
Chicago public schools, and Alice in the home school at Marengo, 111. 



FRANK J. FLOOD. 



Frank J. Flood, one of the progressive farmers of McHenry County, 
is a resident of Woodstock, his farm being on the edge of the city. He 
was born one mile east of Woodstock, May 27, 1866, a son of Owen 
and Margaret (McDonald) Flood, both natives of County Cavan, 
Ireland, where they were married. In 1845, they came to the United 
States bringing with them their infant son. For the first two years 
they were in New York state where the father worked on the construc- 
tion of the Erie Canal, and then looking for similar labor, he brought 
his family west, and located in McHenry County, in 1S47. 

He secured forty acres of government land east of the present site 
of Woodstock, which at that time had not come into existence. There 
was a little log house on the land, and the timber was dense about it. 
There the family lived until 1869, when removal was made to a farm 
two miles further east in Greenwood Township, which was made the 
permanent homestead. This 120 acres of land is now owned by Frank 
J. Flood. The father lived on this farm until his death which occurred 
in 1891, when he was eighty years of age. The mother survived him 
until 1901, when she too passed away, aged seventy-six years. From 
the time he was seventy-eight until his demise, the father was retired 
from all active pursuits. He never cared for public life, but did his duty 



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HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 583 

as a citizen, voting the Democratic ticket. Both he and his wife 
belonged to the Catholic church at Woodstock. 

Frank J. Flood remained on the homestead until he was twenty-two 
years of age, and then came to Woodstock and engaged in stock buying 
and shipping, specializing on dairy cattle, which he gathers in the west, 
fattens and then supplies the needs of farmers in this locality and the 
Chicago market. He is one of the best known men in this line in 
northern Illinois. He now owns the homestead, which he purchased 
for cash from the other heirs, and he has made many improvements 
upon it. Mr. Flood is a Democrat by inheritance and conviction, but 
like his father has not cared to enter public life. Also like his father, 
he is a consistent member and generous supporter of St. Mary's 
Catholic church of Woodstock. 

On March 29, 1913, Mr. Flood was united in marriage with Miss 
Rose McCoy of Grafton Township, a daughter of Arthur McCoy. 
Mrs. Flood was born a few miles south of Woodstock. The children 
of Mr. and Mrs. Flood are three in number, as follows : One who died in 
infancy; Margaret and Francis. 

The Flood family is undoubtedly one of the best known ones in 
McHenry County, and its members have also been very active in the 
upbuilding of St. Mary's Catholic church of Woodstock. Mr. Flood's 
operations as a farmer and stockman entitle him to consideration and 
place him among the representative men of his county and state. 



VERNON N. FORD. 



Vernon N. Ford, one of the retired farmers of Algonquin, was 
formerly largely interested in the agricultural progress of McHenry 
County, and owned his homestead in Algonquin Township. He was 
born in Algonquin Township, October 2, 1843, one of seven children 
born to his parents, Hiram and Lucy (Brown) Ford. Hiram Ford was 
born in Vermont, and in 1841 he came to McHenry County, locating 
in Algonquin Township, two miles west of Algonquin, where he lived 
until his death, May 18, 1848. His wife died in May, 1886. 

Vernon N. Ford was reared in his native township, and attended its 
schools. He was engaged in farm work until his enlistment, when 
eighteen years old, in Company I, Ninety-fifth Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry, for service during the Civil War, and he was mustered out 



584 HISTORY OF McHENRT COUNTY 

May 17, 1S65, as a corporal. Returning to Algonquin Township, he 
resumed fanning, continuing in that line of endeavor until 1SS0, when 
he retired, and moved to Algonquin. Mr. Ford has served as a school 
director for many years, and for thirty-one years has been township 
clerk, and he has also been deputy township assessor. 

On September 5, 1877, Mr. Ford was married to Miss Nelia E. Dodd, 
a daughter of Ambrose Dodd, and a member of one of the prominent 
families of Algonquin Township. Mr. and Mrs. Ford have the follow- 
ing children: Albert V., who lives at Harvard, 111.; Nella B., who is 
Mrs. Frank W. Runge of Evanston, 111.; Elmer A. is a veteran of the 
World War; Jessie E., who is at home, is a music teacher; and one 
who is deceased. He is a man highly respected in his neighborhood, 
and his children are fully sustaining the family name. 



WILLIAM H. FORREST. 

William H. Forrest, formerly actively engaged in farming, is now 
living in honorable retirement at Woodstock, where he is numbered 
among the representative men of the county. He was born November 
8, 1858, a son of Robert Forrest, born October 14, 1835, died November 
10, 1916, and his wife Nancy, who was born September 26, 1832, and 
died February 1, 1908. Robert Forrest was a son of William and 
Jeanette (Drennan) Forrest, natives of Scotland, who, when their son. 
Robert, was still an infant, came to Canada, there remaining until 
1842, when they came to the United States and secured land from 
the government in Hartland Township, McHenry County, five miles 
west of Woodstock. They were accompanied by his wife's sister and 
her husband, Mr. and Mrs. John Planman, who located in Seneca 
Township, not far away from the Forrests. 

After a few years William Forrest went to Chicago, where he died at 
the age of forty-four years, leaving his widow with three children, 
namely: Robert, who later became the father of William H.; Mary, 
who married Charles Heaton, moved to Kansas, and is now Mrs. Riley, 
living in Iowa; and Jennie, who married James Vanorsedal, moved to 
Iowa. 

As a lad Robert Forrest had to assume charge of the farm, and at 
his mother's death, of his sisters. When he was nineteen years old 
he was married to Nancy Mitchell, born in New York, whose parents 



HISTORY OP McHENRY COUNTY 585 

brought her to Hartlaml Township, but later moved to Iowa. Robert, 
retired from the farm, and spent the remaining twenty-eight years of 
his life at, Woodstock. A public-spirited man he was instrumental in 
starting the McHenry County Fair Association, and had charge of the 
grounds during the annual meetings, and he was also one of the pro- 
moters of a local creamery, and for a time was its manager, but failing 
health necessitated his retirement from all business activities. In addi- 
tion to his 240-acre home farm, he owned 260 acres, and operated both 
properties while engaged in agricultural lines. He first began breeding 
Durham cattle, keeping some thirty head, and for several years was 
an exhibitor, with flattering success. He also bred Poland-China swine, 
and his efforts resulted in a betterment in the neighborhood stock and 
the present recognition of the desirability of handling high-grade stock 
is the outcome of the example he set. His children were as follows: 
Mary Jeanette, who is now Mrs. Charles Judd of Woodstock; Charles 
T., who is living retired at Woodstock; and Frank R., who is living 
at Mobile, Ala. 

William H. Forrest, was married December 15, 1883, to Flora Gould, 
a daughter of James and Joanna P. (Phetteplase) Gould, natives of 
Massachusetts, who came from Chicago, where they had been living 
for a time, to Woodstock, on the first train operating between the 
two places. They had also lived at Dayton, Mo., where Flora was 
born February 21, 1860. On account of war conditions, Missouri was 
not a comfortable place for loyal Unionists, and so Mr. Gould was glad 
to get across the Mississippi River into Illinois. He secured a farm 
in Dorr Township, two miles west of Woodstock, but his last few years 
were passed at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Forrest, where he died 
in 1901, aged seventy-six years, his wife died in 1899. Their only son, 
Frank, lives at Woodstock. 

At the time of his marriage, William H. Forrest took up farming 
on land he had bought from his father, and for thirty-five years devoted 
himself to operating it. He also raised Durham cattle and Poland- 
China swine, and then later established a herd of Holstein cattle. In 
1918 he retired and moved to Woodstock, although he retains a part- 
nership with his tenant. He is a director in the Farmers Exchange 
State Bank at Woodstock, and a man of consequence in his community. 
For thirty years he served on the school board, and was supervisor for 
six years. Of late years he has spent his winters in Alabama, and has 
made some profitable investments in that state. Although he and his 
wife have no children of their own, theyhav'e reared two, namely: Daniel 



586 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

Bedoe, whom they took when eight years old; and Fred Simmons, when 
he was ten years old. Mr. Forrest has always voted the Republican 
ticket, and supported its principles. Fraternally he belongs to the 
Odd Fellows, having joined that order over thirty years ago. Mrs. 
Forrest is one of the most active members of the Red Cross chapter 
in her neighborhood, and is a lady of great executive ability, who gave 
liberally of her time and energy to promote all kinds of war work during 
the late war. 



WALTER E. FRAASE. 



Walter E. Fraase, one of the rising young business men of Harvard, 
is the sole proprietor of the Economy Garage, one of the best equipped 
of its kind in this part of the state. He was born in McHenry County, 
October 16, 1889, one of the six children of his parents, Otto F. and 
Hannah (Hyde) Fraase. Otto F. Fraase was born in Germany, but 
came to the United States when he was eighteen years old, and located 
in McHenry Count}-, where he has been engaged in farming for many 
years. 

Walter E. Fraase attended the common and high schools of McHenry 
County, and when he was eighteen years old he learned the trade of a 
machinist, and worked at it for a time, and then established himself in 
a garage business at Woodstock, where he remained until the spring of 
1914, when he came to Harvard, and opened his present garage. His 
stock is worth $5,000, and he does a large business, giving employment 
to five people. 

On July 3, 1913, Mr. Fraase was united in marriage with Miss Mertel 
Merchant, a daughter of Frederick Merchant of Rockford, 111. Mrs. 
Fraase died September 26, 1917, having been a devoted wife, and con- 
sistent member of the Presbyterian church of Harvard. Mr. Fraase 
also belongs to this church. Politically, Mr. Fraase is a Republican, 
but he has not sought public preferment. He belongs to Harvard 
Lodge No. 309, A. F. & A. M. Mr. Fraase has made his own way in 
the world, and deserves the success which has attended him, for he ha* 
worked hard for it. 



GEORGE W. FRAME. 



George W. Frame, postmaster of Woodstock, and one of the repre- 
sentative men of McHenry County, is a native son of Woodstock, and 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 587 

deeply interested in its growth and advancement. He was born at 
Woodstock, October 1 1866, one of the five children of Norman and 
Susie (Sando) Frame, the former of whom was born in West Virginia. 
He was a farmer and manufacturer, and died in 1901. 

George W. Frame attended the grammar and high schools of Wood- 
stock, and after completing his school courses, embarked in a pickle 
business, conducting it profitably until 1900, when he sold and went 
into a feed and milling business, carrying on that enterprise until he 
was appointed postmaster of Woodstock, January 16, 1917, when he 
succeeded W. S. McConnell. Mr. Frame has fifteen employes under 
him in the post office, and his assistant is Bert J. Deitz. Under his 
capable management, the affairs of the office are conducted in a very 
satisfactory manner, and he is extremely popular with all c'asses. 

Mr. Frame was married to Miss Alma R. Cowlin, a daughter of 
Abraham Cowlin, and they have a son, Harold W., who served his 
country as a soldier in the World War. The Presbyterian church of 
Woodstock holds the membership of Mr. Frame and his family. Mr. 
Frame is a member of the Order of Elks. His political convictions have 
made him a strong Democrat, and he has always been active in party 
matters, so that he was the logical candidate for the office o 1 ' postmaster, 
and his work since receiving the appointment proves that the choice was 
a happy one. 



CHRIST FRANKE. 



Christ Franke, senior member of the reliable firm of C. Franke & Co., 
of Algonquin, is one of the substantial men of McHenry County. He 
was born in Germany, April 4, 1863, one of the four children born to 
Christ and Christina (Geister) Franke, also natives of Germany. In 
1865, the father came to the United States, and first settled in Algonquin, 
but later moved to Cook County, 111., where he remained until his death 
which occurred in 1865. The mother survived him until the fall of 
1872. The father was a mason by trade. 

Christ Franke attended the common and high schools of McHenry 
County, and learned the trade of a carpenter, which he followed until 
1894. In that year he went into the retail liquor trade, but sold his 
business in 1912, and bought his present elevator, and since then has 
dealt in flour, feed, coal, coke, seeds and salt. In 1916 he took his sons 
Arthur F. and Clarence W. into the business with him. In addition to 



588 HISTORY OK Mr II KXR V (OI'XTV 

his business interests, Mr. Franke owns ;t valuable farm of 166^ acres 
in Algonquin Township. 

In 1887 Mr. Franke was married to Miss Augusta Wollert, a daughter 
of Fred Wollert, and they have two children, namely: Arthur F., who 
was horn January 6, 1888, married Alida Redquist, and they have two 
children, Dorothy A., and Arthur ('.; and Clarence W., who was born 
October 25, 1889, married Ella Ritt, and they have a son, Clarence C. 
The family all belong to the Lutheran church. Mr. Franke is a Repub- 
lican, and was elected mayor of Algonquin in 1913, and re-elected in 
1915. Prior to 1913, he served for eight years as a member of the 
city council. 



HORACE C. FREEMAN. 

Horace C. Freeman, one of the most progressive farmers of McHenrv 
County, owns and operates a farm of 161 acres of valuable land on 
section 12, Greenwood Township. He was born in Greenwood Town- 
ship, March 23, 1875, a son of Henry and Sarah (Howard) Freeman, 
natives of New York state, both of whom are deceased. Henry Freeman 
was a farmer and lived in McHcnry County for many years prior to his 
death. 

Horace C. Freeman attended the schools of his native township, 
and has always been engaged in farming. He now carries on general 
farming and stock raising, specializing on a good grade of stock. His 
political convictions are such that he is an independent Republican. 

On December 25, 1898, he was married to Mary A. Barber, also born 
in Greenwood Township, September 27, 187G, a daughter of John Barber. 
Mr. and Mrs. Freeman are the parents of the following children: Helen, 
Arlene, May, Flora, Walter, Frank, Mildred and Marion and Lawrence 
C, who are living, and Celia, who died at the age of four years. The 
family is an old one in McHenry County, and its members are held in 
high esteem by the people here, for they have proven themselves excel- 
lent farmers and business men, and very desirable citizens in every 
respect. Mrs. Freeman is a Methodist, as are the older children. 



WILLIAM M. FREEMAN, M. D. 

William M. Freeman, M. D., an eminent physician and surgeon of 
Woodstock, has earned his present standing in his profession through 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 589 

his natural ability and careful training for his calling. He was born 
September 3, 1877, at Chicago, III., one o" the five children of John J. 
and Marjory (Spence) Freeman, of Chicago. John J. Freeman was for 
years connected with leading mercantile houses of Chicago, and now 
lives in Aurora, 111. His wife died in 1913. 

William M. Freeman attended the grammar and high schools of 
Aurora, and then, deciding upon entering the medical profession, he 
matriculated at Rush Medical College, Chicago, from which institution 
he was graduated in 1901. Following his graduation, Mr. Freeman 
spent the subsequent two years as an interne in several of the Chicago 
hospitals, gaining in this way a varied and very valuable experience. 
He then located at Crystal Lake, where he engaged in a general practice 
for fourteen years. Desiring a broader field, he made a change in 
February, 1918, coming at that time to Woodstock, and here he has 
firmly established himself in the confidence of the public. Dr. Free- 
man is a member of the McHenry County Medical Society, the Illinois 
State Medical Society, and the Tri-State Medical Society. His fraternal 
connections are with the Masons, Odd Fellows, and Moose. In politics, 
he is a staunch Republican. 

In 1903 Dr. Freeman was married to Miss Ella M. Corner, a daughter 
of Thomas Corner, and they have three children, namely, Irene M., 
born February 3, 1905; Helen L., born October 6, 1907; and Harold 
M., born April 2, 1911. The family belong to the Congregational church. 
Dr. Freeman is a highly-trained medical man, and keeps abreast of 
modern progress in his profession by constant reading and study. Per- 
sonally he possesses those characteristics likely to win confidence, and 
has built up a large and lucrat ve practice. 



PETER FREUND. 



Peter Freund, now deceased, was formerly engaged in farming in 
McHenry County, and was regarded as one of the substantial men of 
this locality. He was born in Germany, and when he was twenty years 
of age, he came to the United States with his parents, John Peter and 
Margaret Freund, and his brothers, John, Jacob, Michael and Christ, 
all of whom are now deceased, Christ dying in California, and the others 
in McHenry County. 

Peter Freund was married to Susan Hess, and settled on land where 



590 HISTORY OF McIIENRY COUNTY 

he lived and died. He erected the finest house on the hay. His children 
were as follows: Barbara, who is Mrs. Wolfe of Chicago; Jacob, who 
lives in the village of McHenry; John, who lives in the vicinity of Mr- 
Henry; Christina, who married John Miller, died at the age of thirty- 
five years; Mary, who married Nick Webber, died when about thirty- 
five years; M. Joseph, who lives near McHenry; Hubert, who is the 
next in order of birth; Nicholas, who is a blacksmith of Spring Grove; 
Peter, who lives near Johnsburg; Michael, who lives near Spring Grove; 
and Elizabeth, who is Mrs. Matt Freund, lives near Spring Grove. 

Hubert Freund was born on the old farm, July 29, 1867, and re- 
mained at home until after he had attained his majority. For nine 
years he rented the Jackson farm in Richmond Township, and then 
bought the Bell farm of 120 acres in Richmond Township, and erected 
a new dairy barn on it and made other improvements during the ten 
years he owned it. In 1909 he sold his farm and bought the Covell 
farm of 220 acres, one mile east of McHenry, on which he has put up 
a silo, and built a dairy barn. He has a herd of thirty-five cows of the 
Holstein strain, and has Percheron horses for farm use. His farm is 
located on high land and has good natural drainage. In politics he is 
independent. 

When he was twenty-two years old, Hubert Freund was married to 
Kate Meyers, a daughter of Anton and Emma Mary Meyers, and they 
have the following family: Anton, who married Mary Freund, lives 
near McHenry; Emma, who is Mrs. Peter M. Freund, lives near Spring 
Grove; Barbara, who is Mrs. Joseph L. Freund, lives near Johnsburg; 
and Gertrude, Margaret, George, Joseph, Alfred, Florence and Rosela, 
all of whom are at home. The parents were members of the old St. 
John's Catholic church at Johnsburg, but Hubert Freund and his family 
belong to St. Mary's Catholic church at McHenry. 



STEPHEN H. FREUND. 



Stephen H. Freund, who has served as supervisor of McHenry 
Township, is one of the progressive farmers of this county, and a man 
well and favorably known. He was born in Richmond Township, 
McHenry County, September 26, 1864, one of the nine children of 
Mathias S. and Anna (Freund) Freund, natives of Germany, who came 
to the United States in 1850 and 1843, respectively. For many years 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY .591 

the father was a farmer upon an extensive scale, but he is now living 
retired. The mother died March 20, 1917. 

Stephen H. Freund attended the public and private schools of his 
native county, and was reared upon his father's farm. Although he 
learned the trade of a carpenter, he only followed that calling a short 
time, having otherwise devoted himself to farming. He now owns a 
beautiful farming property, adjacent to the city of McHenry, consisting 
of 173 acres of very valuable land. 

On January 25, 1888, Mr. Freund was married to Miss Catherine 
Klapperich, a daughter of Peter M. Klapperich, and a member of a 
very prominent McHenry County family. Mr. and Mrs. Freund have 
seven children, as follows: Mary N., Anton P., Cecelia E., Carl J., 
Herbert H., Helen L. and Bertilla A. Mr. Freund is independent in 
his politics, and in 1909 he was elected supervisor of McHenry Township, 
and re-elected to the same office continuously ever since, serving a por- 
tion of the time as chairman. He has served on the school board of 
his district, and was a member of the board of education for the city 
of McHenry. He and Mrs. Freund belong to the German Catholic 
church, and he is a member of the Knights of Columbus. Both in 
public and private life Mr. Freund is very prominent, and his standing 
in his community is unquestioned. 



CHRISTIAN FRITZ. 



Christian Fritz, commissioner of roads for Coral Township, and 
one of the representative men of McHenry County, has one of the 
choice farms of his township, which has been developed by an immense 
amount of hard work on his part. He is an expert in road improvement, 
as is attested by the many miles of excellent highways under his super- 
vision. He was born in Dundee, Kane County, 111., January 23, 1871, 
a son of Christ and Minnie (Hence) Fritz, both of whom were born in 
Mecklenburg, Germany. 

Christ Fritz came to the United States when he was between nineteen 
and twenty years old, and was married at Dundee, 111., in 1870. When 
his son Christian was one year old, he took his family in a wagon to 
Adams County, Wis., having traded his house at Dundee for an unde- 
veloped farm, and there he remained until 1915, or for over forty years, 
and during that period developed it into a very valuable property 



592 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

This farm comprises 2flo acres of land <>n the Wisconsin River, and 
on it ho built a fine sot of buildings. During the time he lived there 
he served on the school board and was a representative man in every 
way. l'pon his retirement from the farm he went back to Dundee 
so as to be among his old friends. 

( 'hristian Fritz is the only member of his family to come to Mr Homy 
County. Until ho was seventeen years old ho was on the home farm 
in Wisconsin, but then began working out by the month for farmers, 
so continuing until he was nineteen, then leaving Wisconsin for Illinois, 
and for several years worked on farms in the vicinity of Dundee. When 
he was twenty-two years old he was married to Freda Lussow of Mil- 
waukee, Wis., who had come to the United States throe years prior to 
her marriage. Her father's last years wore spent in the Fritz home, 
where he died in 1918 at the age of eighty-throe years, the mother 
having passed away three years previously. 

At the time of his marriage, Christian Fritz routed a farm near 
Dundee, staying on it for seven years, and then rented another farm 
in Riley Township, where he remained for five years, a portion of the 
time being on the Fred Schultz farm, paying cash instead of produce 
for his rent. Mr. Fritz then bought his present farm, in 1905, it being 
the 160-acre property known as the Joseph Kalbaugh farm, and since 
then he rebuilt the house, and has a barn 36 x 96 feet, with an el 36 x 30 
feet, using the latter as a horse shelter. The basement is cemented, 
and the outbuildings are equally modern. He has a silo and has tiled 
sixty acres, which are now the most productive of his land, the process 
requiring over nine carloads of the tile. Each year he has made improve- 
ments, but they have paid, for the farm for which he paid $75 per acre 
in 1905, is worth several times as much today. Dairying is his principal 
interest, and he milks about forty-five cows. For twenty-five years he 
has operated a threshing machine, and for several years has done the 
local threshing, silo filling, corn shelling, etc. For six years he has been 
road commissioner, and during that period has put the roads in fine 
condition, and the cement bridges over the streams are well built, some 
of them costing as much as $3,000. Ho keeps up the road grading, and 
is constantly urging the necessity of continuing these improvements. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fritz became the parents of the following children: 
Arthur, who' married Edith Stopen, attended high school and business 
college, is at home, assisting his father in operating the farm; Minnie, 
who married Frank Anderson, a fireman on the Illinois Central Railroad, 
lives at Freeport, 111., and has a daughter, June D.; Rudolph, who is 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 593 

in Wyoming; Florence, who is at home; and Raymond, who is also 
at home. Mr. Fritz and his family are members of the Lutheran 
church at Union. 



JAMES GANNON. 



James Gannon, one of the native sons of McHenry County, and now 
a prosperous farmer of Grafton Township, was born on his present 
farm, on section 14, July 4, 1849, in a log cabin which is still standing, 
and which was built by his father in 1847. James Gannon is a son of 
Luke Gannon, born in Ireland, who came to the United States when 
fifteen years old, making the trip in a sailing vessel, which took six 
weeks to cross the ocean. After reaching this country Luke Gannon 
worked on the Erie Canal in New York state for a short time, and then 
came on to Illinois, and was employed on the construction of the Illinois 
and Michigan canal. As soon as he had sufficient money, he came to 
McHenry County and spent a year in Dorr Township, and then in 1847, 
bought ,t he farm now occupied by his son. His death occurred in 1866. 
He was married to Margaret Fallen, who was born in Ireland. Their 
children were as follows: John, who is deceased; Peter, who lives in 
Iowa; Thomas, who lives in North Dakota; and Katherine Minning, 
Mary, Margaret and Michael, all of whom are deceased, having died 
within two years of each other. 

James Gannon attended the local schools, and grew up on his farm. 
On June 3, 1884, he was married to Elizabeth Malone, also a native of 
McHenry County, born February 14, 1863, a daughter of Cornelius 
Malone, who settled in this county prior to the Civil War. Mr. and 
Mrs. Gannon have had the following children born to them: John, 
James, who married Julie Williams, has two children, Mary J. and 
Katherine E.; Ed.; Margaret; Mary; Katherine; Stasia; Eleanor; and 
Stella, who died at the age of one year. 

Mr. Gannon's farm comprises 160 acres of land, which he devotes 
to general farming and dairying, he milking about twenty-four cows, 
his herd containing thirty-five. It is interesting to note, in view of 
his success, that Mr. Gannon never took a drop of intoxicating liquor 
in his life. He is an independent Democrat and was two terms com- 
missioner, and many years a school director and trustee. As a farmer 
and citizen, he is held in the highest respect, and his prosperity is de- 
served, for he has earned it by legitimate means. 



594 BISTORT OF MclIENRY COUNT V 

ORLANDO GARRISON. 

Orlando Garrison was a retired fanner of Greenwood Township, 
but at one time was one of the leading: agriculturalists of McHenry 
County. He was born in New York state, July 10, 1841, a son of Noah 
and Sarah (Bates) Garrison, natives of New York state. Noah Garrison 
was a fanner, who came to Illinois in 1848, and settling in Greenwood 
Township developed a valuable farm, prior to his death, when he was 
forty-seven years old. 

Orlando Garrison attended the local schools and learned practical 
farming from his father, following in his footsteps in the selection of a 
calling. For many years he was engaged in operating his 212 acres of 
land on section 13, Greenwood Township. 

Mr. Garrison was married three times, his first wife having been 
Malinda Boon, who bore him two sons, William and Noah J. After her 
death, Mr. Garrison was married (second) to Anna A. Young, who died, 
leaving no children. The present Mrs. Garrison bore the maiden name 
of Frances Jackson Wickham. She was born in McHenry County. 
By a former marriage she had a son Clifford who married Anna Weber, 
and the}' have three children: Walter D., Wilbert J., and Marion K. 
Mi', and Mrs. Garrison had no children. Mr. Garrison was a Republican, 
but never sought public office. His experiences went back many years 
in the history of Illinois for his parents brought him to this state in 1848, 
before the present great railroad systems were built which now provide 
safe and rapid means of travel. Then the sturdy pioneers had to risk 
much, and brave dangers as well as discomforts in order to make the 
change from the east to the west. His parents traveled from Albany to 
Buffalo, N. Y., on the Erie Canal, and there re-loaded their household 
possessions on a lake boat which landed them at Waukegan, 111., in 1848, 
and from there the trip to Greenwood Township, McHenry County, was 
accomplished by wagon. 



PROF. EDWARD A. GARDNER. 

Prof. Edward A. Gardner, superintendent of the schools of Marengo, 
and one of the best-known educators in this part of the state, is recog- 
nized as the right man in the right place. He was born in Westmoreland 
County, Pa., December 29, 1861, one of the five children of Samuel 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 595 

and Jane (Hill) Gardner. Samuel Gardner was born in Pennsylvania, 
and was engaged in farming until his death in 1905. 

Edward A. Gardner attended the common and high schools of his 
native state, and was graduated from the Merchant's Academy in 1880. 
He followed these courses with one at the Pennsylvania State Normal 
School, and immediately after his graduation, entered the educational 
field as an instructor. Later he came to Illinois, and for sixteen con- 
secutive years was superintendent of schools of Ford County. In 1914, 
he received his present appointment at Marengo, and since that time 
lias concentrated his efforts upon the improvement and development 
of his school. He has 440 pupils and fifteen teachers under his super- 
vision, and all concerned have every reason to be proud of the progress 
made. 

Professor Gardner was married to Miss Alice E. Ross, a daughter 
of George W. Ross of Westmoreland County, Pa., and they have two 
children, namely: Edward Ross, and Kenneth M. The family belong 
to the Methodist Episcopal church. Professor Gardner belongs to 
the McHenry County Teachers' Association and the Illinois Teachers' 
State Association. In politics he is a Republican. His fraternal con- 
nections are with the Masons and Modern Woodmen and Knights of 
Pythias. A scholarly man, he has devoted his life to h's profession, 
and his success proves that he decided wisely when he adopted it as his 
life work. 



ROBERT B. GARDNER. 

Robert B. Gardner, now deceased, was formerly actively engaged 
in farming, and owned and operated a fine farm at Solon Mills. He 
was born March 23, 1847, in a house that occupied about the same site 
as the present one, on the farm now owned by his son, W. H. Gardner. 
His father, William Gardner, was born in Scotland, and died November 
1, 1893, his wife having passed away in March, 1889. They were 
married in Canada, and in 1837 came to McHenry County, entering 
from the government the present farm of W. H. Gardner. A carpenter 
by trade, William Gardner erected the present house in 1850, and it is 
still a substantial structure. The children of William Gardner were 
as follows: James, who when twenty-one went to Baker City, Ore., and 
died there; Mary, who married John Merrill, a carpenter of Solon 
Mills, died there as did her husband; Robert, whose name heads this 



596 BISTORY OP McHENRY COUNTY 

review; Willis, who remained on the homestead, died at the age of 
thirty; and Flora, who married Charles L. Turner, lived on a portion 
of the old farm until her death, after which Mr. Turner moved to Solon 
Mills, where he is still residing. 

Robert Gardner remained on his father's homestead until he was 
twenty-five years old at which time he was married to Adela Turner, 
a sister of Charles Turner, who died one year later, leaving one daughter, 
Carrie A., who is Mrs. John Oxtoby of Hinton, Okla. -In 1878 Mr. 
Gardner was married (second) to Amelia H. Turner, an elder sister of 
his first wife, and a daughter of Robert L. and Mary (Lee) Turner, 
both natives of Yorkshire, England, who were married at Detroit. 
Mich., and in 1843 came to Chicago to join his brothers already located 
there. Mr. Turner operated a blacksmith shop and wagon shop at 
Ghicago, until 1871, on the corner of Michigan and State streets, on 
the North Side, but being burned out during the Great Fire of 1871, 
he brought his family to McHenry County. At that time Mr. Turner 
was building a mill at Solon Mills, but his losses prevented his finishing 
it and it still stands as he left it. He owned a farm near Solon Mills, 
and on it Mr. Turner died in 1887, aged seventy-eight years. Mr. and 
Mrs. Turner had twelve children, five of whom still survive, four of them 
residing in McHenry County, and one son at Canyon City, Colo. 

At his father's death, Robert Gardner bought the interests of the 
other heirs, becoming the owner of 175 acres of land of which he later 
sold forty acres, leaving 135 acres in the farm now known as the Gardner 
Farm. For five years he conducted it, and then went to Colorado for 
five years, having previously been there for ten years. Upon his return 
to McHenry County, Robert Gardner located at Solon Mills, where he 
died April 30, 1902. After his death, the farm was rented until 1910, 
when his son, Willis H., took charge of it. Mr. Gardner had spent a 
good deal of his life away from McHenry County, but his main interests 
were centered here. He and his second wife early united with the 
Presbyterian church. 

By his second marriage Mr. Gardner had the following children: 
William R., died at the age of twenty-one years at Rocky Ford, Colo.; 
and Willis Henry, who was born at Solon Mills, February 16, 1880. 
Flora J. died aged five years; and one died in infancy. 

In 1907 Willis H. Gardner was graduated from the agricultural 
department of the University of Wisconsin, and for the subsequent 
three years was in the employ of the government as superintendent 
of dairy tests for an experimental station, and was -engaged in making 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 597 

special butter records. In 1910 he came home and took charge of the 
farm for his mother, and is now operating it as a dairy property, keeping 
about twenty-five head of pure-bred Holstein cattle, and grows breeding 
animals for sale. He is a member of the County Farm Bureau, and is 
on the school board. 

On March 24, 1910, Mr. Gardner was married to Addie Overton, 
a daughter of William J. Overton of Solon Mills, a sketch of whom 
appears elsewhere in this work. Mr. and Mrs. Gardner have four 
children, as follows: William Bruce, Robert Willis, Eunice Ann and 
Ruth Amelia. Recently Mr. Gardner purchased a residence at Crystal 
Lake. 



RICHARD GAULT. 



Richard Gault was formerly a merchant at Marengo, and later 
engaged in conducting a general insurance and real-estate business, 
in partnership with his son, Paul, under the firm name of Richard Gault 
& Son. The firm represent one of the strongest and most reliable 
companies in the world, the Royal Insurance Company. Richard 
Gault was born in Posen, Germany, February 15, 1854, and came to 
the United States in 1870, locating at Chicago, where he remained until 
after the Great Fire. In October, 1871, he came to Woodstock, where 
he found employment with Fred Renich, with whom he remained until 
he formed a partnership with Charles Kremer, under the name of Gault 
& Kremer. and located near the depot at Woodstock. In 1874 Mr. 
Gault sold his interest to his partner, and returned to Chicago. Sub- 
sequently he came back to McHenry County, and began working at 
his trade of cigarmaking at Marengo for Randolph Renwick, assisting 
Mr. Renwick to organize the factory, which he bought on July 4, 1875. 

In 1885 Mr. Gault founded the Fair store, in 1904 replacing the old 
building with a new one, but in September, 1911, he sold the mercantile 
business. As early as 1885 Mr. Gault began selling insurance, and at 
the same time began acting as correspondent for the Woodstock Sentinel. 
Branching out from being the local agent for the Royal Fire Insurance 
Company, Mr. Gault built up a fine connection and his renewals alone 
yielded him a handsome income. Ten years ago he bought his residence 
and office which occupy the site of the first building erected at Marengo, 
which was built in 1836 by Calvin Spencer and for some years was used 
as a tavern. It is in the center of the village at the intersection of 



.Vis HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

State and Highway streets. After he gained possession of the property 

Mr. Gaull rebuilt and remodelled the house and it is a beautiful home. 

In l875*Mr. Gault was married to Emma Basuier, who died in 
1883, having borne him two children, namely: Oswald E., who is a 
resident of Woodstock; and Alice, who married Andrew Swanson, died 
at Aurora, 111., on Thanksgiving Day, 1918, of ptomaine poisoning, and 
is buried in the Marengo Cemetery. In November, 1885, Mr. Gault 
was married second to Maggie Farmer, who died May 3, 1917. The 
children of his second marriage were as follows: Paul, who is in business 
with his father; Ellen, who married Eugene McNeaney, a retail merchant 
operating the Gault Bazaar; Anna, who is her father's housekeeper; 
Caroline, who married Cleatus Gundy of Gary, Ind.; Alphonse E., who 
died in childhood; and Julia, who is a saleslady in Gault's Bazaar, 
lives at home. 

Mr. Gault belonged to the Mystic Workers and the Modern Woodmen 
of America, and held office in both orders. He also belonged to the Com- 
munity Club. The Sacred Heart Catholic church held his member- 
ship. Mr. Gault was a substantial citizen with many friends. He was 
fully Americanized, and during the late war invested liberally in the 
various bonds, and contributed generously to the different war activities. 
Mr. Gault had been with the Royal Insurance Company so long that 
they placed confidence in him and his son and gave them the power 
to adjust their own losses and that is what the assured likes. The 
speedy adjustments made by this firm have resulted in the present 
extra good business. He also held a §2,000 life insurance policy with 
the Bankers Life Insurance Company, of Des Moines, Iowa, for years. 
Mr. Gault died December 24, 1921, and his son, Paul II. will continue 
the business. 



IDA LOU GEHRIG. 



Ida Lou Gehrig, librarian at Harvard, is one of the accomplished 
and scholarly ladies of McHenry County, and one who is very efficient 
in her present position. She was born at Pekin, 111., a daughter of Charles 
F. and Anna (Turner) Gehrig. From childhood Miss Gehrig has been 
of a studious turn of mind, and after she was graduated from the Pekin 
High School, she took up special studies for perfecting herself for the 




1 



HISTORY OP McHENRY COUNTY 599 

work of a librarian, doing Story Hour work in the Peoria, III., public 
library, and attending the summer school and the University of Illinois 
Library School. When the trustees of Harvard, 111., were looking for 
a competent person to put in charge of the library, Miss Gehrig was 
suggested as a candidate. Her selection has met with universal approval 
from the patrons of the library, who not only receive from her a gracious 
courtesy, but timely and patient assistance in their courses of reading 
and study, so that those desiring to make use of the library for the pur- 
pose of adding to their store of knowledge or to pursue some special 
study, will find here the expert help they require to accomplish their 
purpose. 



BENJAMIN C. GETZELMAN. 

Benjamin C. Getzelman, president of the Algonquin State Bank, 
and a man of importance in the community, has been connected with 
the financial affairs of this part of the state for a number of years. He 
was born at Hampshire, Kane County, 111., January 1, 1870, a son of 
Malachi C. and Eve (Rudolph) Getzelman. 

Malachi C. Getzelman was born in Germany, January 1, 1837, and 
came to the United States in 1845, landing at New York City, from 
whence he came west to Hampshire, Kane County, 111., where he became 
interested in farming. During the Civil War, he enlisted in the Fifty- 
second Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and served for four years, receiving 
his honorable discharge in 1865. He is now living retired at Elgin, 
111., and belongs to the G. A. R. of that city. He and his wife had 
four children. 

Benjamin C. Getzelman attended the grammar and high schools 
of his native county, and also took a pharmaceutical course, in which 
he was graduated, and he was made a registered pharmacist in 1890. 
From 1890 until 1894, he was engaged in the drug business at Elgin, 
but in the latter year entered the clerical department of the Elgin 
National Bank, and remained with that institution until February, 
1902, when he left it to organize the Algonquin Bank, which was incor- 
porated as the Algonquin State Bank, June 27, 1913, with a capital 
stock of $25,000.00, which he has since served as president. Mr. 
Getzelman is also a director of the Chapell Ice Cream Company of 
Chicago. 



600 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

In 1898, Mr. Getzelman was married to Miss Jennie Chapell, a 
daughter of Clarence E. Chapell, and they have two children, Eunice 
J. and Benjamin Chapell Getzelman. Mr. Getzelman is a charter 
member of Algonquin Lodge No. 960 A. F. & A. M., and belongs to 
Freeport Consistory and the Mystic Shrine, of Rockford. In politics 
he is a Republican, and served as alderman from his ward from 1915 
to 1917. During the late war he was on the Local Exemption Board 
of McHenry County. Mr. Getzelman was alternate delegate to the 
Republican National Convention at Chicago in 1912. The family all 
are Universalists. A man of more than ordinary prominence, Mr. 
Getzelman has worked for his community as well as himself, and his 
prominence is well deserved. 



ERNEST A. GIESEL. 



Ernest A. Giesel, pastor of Trinity Evangelical Lutheran church 
of Harvard, is one of the eloquent and forceful members of his profession 
in McHenry County. He was born at Baraboo, Wis., June 18, 1877, 
a son of Rev. E. 0. Giesel, now deceased, formerly an occupant of the 
pulpit of his son. E. 0. Giesel was born in Silesia, Germany, in 1S49, 
a son of Adolph and Nora (Koener) Giesel, who spent their lives in 
Silesia, Germany, where the father died in 1880, his wife having passed 
away several years previously. 

Having decided on entering the ministry, E. O. Giesel, after com- 
pleting his schooling in the public institutions of his native place, studied 
in a theological college in Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, and then in 
1S73, desiring to benefit from the broader opportunities offered in the 
United States, came to this country, and became a student of the Theo- 
logical Lutheran Seminary at Mendota, 111., from which he was 
graduated in 1874, and ordained to the ministry of the Lutheran Evan- 
gelical church in 1875. . He preached at various points in Illi- 
nois and Wisconsin, including Meredosia, Harvard, and Glencoe, 
111., Baraboo and Platteville, Wis., coining from the last named place to 
Harvard, McHenry County, and was the highly esteemed and beloved 
pastor of the church of his faith there until his deatli on December 5, 
1912. He had founded many Lutheran churches in Illinois and Wiscon- 
sin; was a man possessed of a wonderful intellect, and big heart. He 
had a truly kind and Christian disposition that made him legions of 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 601 

friends wherever he went, and his death was mourned especially at 
Harvard, and also throughout the Synod. Large delegations of his 
friends came from Chicago and Platteville to attend his funeral at 
Harvard, and his mortal remains were laid to rest in the cemetery at 
this village. The good work he had commenced at Harvard has been 
continued by his son, Rev. E. A. Giesel. 

In 1876 Rev. E. O. Giesel was married first to Miss Anna Hebert, 
who died the following year leaving a son, Ernest A., who was then only 
nine days old. In 1878, he was married second to his wife's sister, 
Miss Elizabeth Hebert, and they became the parents of the following 
children: George, Anna, Clara, Nora, Amanda, Adolph, Mary and 
Frieda. Some idea of the respect in which the late Mr. Giesel was held 
in his community is evidenced by the fact that during the day of his 
funeral the business houses all closed their doors as a token of respect 
to him. He was equally respected at Platteville, Wis., where his pastorate 
had extended over nearly a quarter of a century. 

The dying request of the mother of Rev. E. A. Giesel determined 
the future of the nine-day son, as she asked her heart-broken husband 
that he train the little one to enter the profession she felt the father so 
honored. Consequently, after he had received the customary common- 
school education, Ernest A. Giesel became a student of the Platteville 
High School, and later of the State Normal School of the same city. 
Still later he took his college training at Waverly, and Clinton, Iowa, 
and his theological courses at St. Paul, Minn., and Saginaw, Mich., 
being graduated in 1898. His first ministerial charge was in Butler 
County, Iowa, in the vicinity of Allison, and from there he was sent to 
Fall Creek, Wis. During the early years of his ministry he was working 
under the direction of the Missionary Board, as a missionary whose 
work it was to establish churches in small, neglected and out-of-the-way 
places so that all might have an opportunity to learn the truth of the 
Master's teachings. His success in founding and building up churches, 
increasing the membership and spiritual strength of the congregations, 
has been remarkable, and sets an example for other young mission- 
aries to strive to emulate. Among the communities in which his good 
work was carried on may be mentioned the following: Columbus, 
Arlington, Waupaca and Baldwin Mills, Wis., and South Haven, Mich., 
having received and accepted a call from that place, although his de- 
parture was deeply regretted by his former congregations. It was 
while he was accomplishing splendid work for his people at South Haven, 
that he received the news of his father's sudden demise after an illness 



602 BISTORT OF McIIENRY COUNTY 

of only a few days' duration. Believing that he ought to accept the 
call made him by his father's church, he did so, and look charge of the 
Harvard Church at once, having at that time been a minister of the 
gospel for thirteen years. Those years had been full of busy, effective 
hours, and consequently great development in the career of the young 
clergyman, and these experiences, some of them strenuous and difficult, 
ripened his character, and fitted him for the greater work he was to 
perform. 

On December 13, 1899, Mr. Giesel was married to Miss Marie 
Michelis of Marion, Wis., a daughter of P. A. and Marie (Sever! ) 
Michelis, and they have the following children: Marie, who was born 
at Fall (reck, Wis., July 17, 1901; Gertrude, who was born at Colum- 
bus, Wis., February 9, 1903; and Ernest Oscar, who was born at Colum- 
bus, Wis., July 26, 1906. A more detailed account of the work of Mr. 
Giesel at Harvard is given under the chapter of churches elsewhere in 
lliis history, which will demonstrate that in him his church and com- 
munity have one of the most valuable men in McHenry County. 



JAMES W. GILBERT. 



James W. Gilbert, one of the substantial business men of Crystal 
Lake, carries a large and carefully selected stock of furniture and operates 
a first-class undertaking establishment. He was born in Lake County, 
111., November 18, 1871, one of two children born to Eugene E. and 
Catherine (Griffin) Gilbert, Eugene E. Gilbert was born in New York 
state, but came to Lake County, 111., when a small boy, and has since 
resided there. 

James W. Gilbert attended the schools of Lake County, and the 
university at Valparaiso, Ind., following which he embarked in a hard- 
ware business, but disposed of it at the expiration of one year, and then 
bought an undertaking business at Crystal Lake. To this he added 
the handling of furniture and carried a full and complete line of furniture, 
rugs, carpets and linoleums. Five years later he sold this business and 
went into the furniture business at Union, 111., and added the handling 
of hardware. On March 9, 1911, he also disposed of this business, 
and then September 1, 1911, he bought his present establishment, 
which he conducts upon an extensive scale. He is a graduate of the 
Barnes Embalming School, class of 1897. His furniture stock averages 



HISTORY OF McIIENRY COUNTY 603 

$4,000 and he has $4,500 invested in his undertaking business, exclu- 
sive of his $6,000 auto hearse. The building in which his business is 
located was bought by Mr. Gilbert at a cost of $5,000. 

In 1S95 Mr. Gilbert was married to Miss Lillian E. Shaw, and they 
have the following children: Vivian E., Una I. and Leroy E. The 
family belong to the Congregational church. Mr. Gilbert's fraternal 
connections are with the Masons, Odd Fellows and Modern Woodmen 
of America. In politics he is a Republican, and he served for ten years 
as township treasurer of Coral Township. Mr. Gilbert is well fitted 
for his profession, possessing those characteristics which make it possible 
for him to bring comfort into the homes of the afflicted, while his skill 
and knowledge insure that proper care will be given the dead and a 
dignified respect shown their memory. 



WILLIAM B. GILBERT. 

William B. Gilbert, for many years one of the successful farmers of 
Nunda Township, is now living in honorable retirement at Crystal Lake. 
He was born June 11, 1858, a son of George and Sarah (Mack) Gilbert. 
George Gilbert was born in New York State in 1818, a son of Abraham 
Gilbert, also a native of New York. The Gilbert family is of Holland- 
Dutch extraction. Sarah Mack was born in New York, a daughter of 
Abner Mack. George Gilbert was a farmer, who came to Illinois 
about 1846, and settled in Nunda Township, where he bought 150 
acres of land, which is now very valuable. In politics he was a Republi- 
can. He and his wife had the following children: Electa M., who is 
deceased; Edson R. ; Ada L., who married Edwin Eaton; Minnie M., 
who married a Mr. Fink; William B.; and Martin V., who is deceased. 

William B. Gilbert attended the schools of Nunda Township, and 
those of the town of Ringwood. For many years he was engaged in 
farming his 155 acres of land in Nunda Township, but since his retire- 
ment in 1915 has sold it. 

In 1879 Mr. Gilbert was married to Charlotte A. Colby, born in 
McHenry County, a daughter of Allen P. Colby. Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert 
became the parents of one daughter, Dora. She is the wife of Michael 
Conley of Oak Park, 111., and they have the following children: Howard, 
Everett, Morton and William. Mr. Gilbert is a Republican. 



604 HISTORY OF McHENRY COCNTY 

II \RRY D. GILE. 

Harry D. Gile, one of the worth-while men and first-class fanners of 
Chemung Township, is located seven and one-half miles northwest of 
Harvard, a portion of his farm being in Boone County just across the 
county line. lie was horn in Walworth County, Wis., five miles north- 
east of Sharon, December 26, 1883, a son of Frank and Emma (Smith) 
Gile. Frank Gile was born in Sharon, and died there March 17, 1920, 
hut his widow survives him and still makes her home at Sharon. 

Harry D. Gile has spent his life in farming anil understands its every 
detail. When only nineteen years old, on June 24, 1902, he was married 
to Hat tie May Powers, born December 29, 1880, a daughter of Esco and 
Eva (Brown) Powers. Mrs. Powers died at Chemung where they had 
been residing, and Mr. Powers then went to Chicago, 111., and died about 
three years later. Hattie May Powers was reared at Chemung, and 
attended its schools. 

Following his marriage Mr. Gile rented land and continued to be a 
tenant for eight years, for four of them being in McIIenry Township. 
He then bought a portion of the old Ridge farm, located in Boone County, 
on which no buildings had then been erected, and in March, 1914, he 
exchanged it for his present farm owned by the family of Robert Pearson, 
comprising 217 acres, eighty acres of which are in Boone County. He 
has erected a new barn and a tenant house and made other improvements 
including the remodelling of the present buildings and the putting up of 
a silo. He keeps fifty head of cattle of the pure-bred Holstein strain, 
and carries on dairying with twenty-five cows, and he also breeds pure- 
bred Duroc-Jersey hogs. A very progressive man, he organized The 
Boys and Girls Club, of which two of his children were the first members, 
and he is now a leader in this movement. His Corn Club won first place 
in several exhibits of corn demonstration, and first place in the demonstra- 
tion at the State Fair at Springfield. He now has three clubs, one Corn 
another Pig, and a third Calf. These clubs have resulted in the develop- 
ment of great interest among the farmers, who encourage their children 
in joining them. The results are various farm betterments and a greater 
desire on the part of the young people to remain on the farms. During 
the World War, Mr. Gile was very active in war work, stimulating in a 
marked degree the sale of bonds and contributions to the Red Cross and 
other organizations. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gile became the parents of the following children: 
Norma; Fred, who is attending the Sharon High School; Iva, Orpha, 



HISTORY OF McIIENKY COUNTY G05 

Helen, Wihna, Laverna and Dorothea. Mr. Gile and his family belong 
to Sharon Methodist church, and he is active in its work as he is in other 
organizations. For some time he has been a member of the Farm Bureau 
of the Illinois Agricultural Association. The farm of Mr. Gile is one of 
the best operated in this part of the state. The policy of this alert, 
astute business man and modern farmer, is to carry on his farming as 
he would a factory or mercantile establishment were his talents devoted 
to the running of such enterprises, and whenever he finds by his own 
experiments, or those of others, that a certain method or appliance will 
increase his efficiency and improve his property, he adopts it. His work 
among the young people of his neighborhood can scarcely be over- 
estimated in its value, not only to them but the community at large, 
and is entirely on a line with the best ideas of constructive citizenship 
advocated by the best authorities. In 1920 Mr. Gile somewhat extended 
the scope of his operations by buying fifty-nine acres of land at the edge 
of Sharon, Wis. 



O. H. GILLMORE. 
Page 135. 

CHARLES W. GODDARD, M. D. 

Charles W. Goddard, M. D., one of the leading physicians and sur- 
geons of McHenry County, is engaged in a general practice at Harvard, 
where he is held in the highest respect, and where he is now serving as 
city health officer. He was born at Cedarville, 111., January 19, 1857, 
the only child of his parents, Fayette and Anna (Stiles) Goddard, the 
former of whom was a noted educator, who died in Stevenson County, 
111., in 1864. 

Doctor Goddard attended the common and high schools of his 
native place, and then took a course at the Chicago Medical College, 
from which he was graduated in 1882. Immediately thereafter, he 
located at Rockford, 111., where he was engaged in a general practice 
until 1883, when he came to McHenry County, and established himself 
at Harvard. He belongs to the McHenry County Medical Society, 
the Illinois State Medical Society, and the American Medical Associa- 



606 HISTOKY OP MdlKXKY COUNTY 

tion. In addition to attending; to the duties of his practice, Doctor 
Goddard is local surgeon for the Northwestern Railroad Company, and 
was elected city health officer of Harvard several years ago, on the 
Republican ticket, which office he still holds, rendering his community 
a valuable service in that capacity. 

In 1882 Doctor Goddard was united in marriage with Miss Caroline 
Blake, a daughter of John Blake, a prominent citizen of Rockford, 111. 
Doctor and Mrs. Goddard have the following children: Paul B., 'who 
is a manufacturer of Chicago, 111.; Carl B., who is an attorney of Detroit. 
Mich.; and Dorothy, who married T. R. Strobridge, a manufacturer 
of Chicago. The Goddards are very prominent socially, and they are 
deservedly popular not only at Harvard, but throughout McIIenry 
County. 



WILLIAM V. GOODER, M. D. 

William V. Gooder, M. D., one of the progressive physicians and 
surgeons of Marengo, was born at St. Paul, Minn., August 1, 1881. 
The paternal grandfather came from Halifax, England, to the United 
States in the early forties, settling in Wisconsin, and his son, the father 
of Doctor Gooder, was born in Monroe County, Wis., later moved to 
St. Paul, Minn., and later to Iowa, where he died when his son, William 
V., was only five years old. The widowed mother took him back to 
the city of his nativity, and he later attended school at Tomah, Wis., 
being graduated from its high school at the age of seventeen years, and 
the subsequent year began to read medicine, beginning the regular 
course at the age of nineteen years, when he became a student of the 
medical department of the Northwestern University at Chicago, from 
which he was graduated in 1905. For a year thereafter he was interne 
at the Wesley Memorial Hospital, and then went to Lowell, Ind., where 
he was engaged in a general practice for eight years, but his health 
failing him he went to California, and upon his return to Chicago, took 
a post graduate course, and learning of Marengo, and realizing the 
possibilities of the healthful dairying region surrounding it decided to 
locate there permanently, which he did in 1913. Feeling it to be his 
duty, Doctor Gooder enlisted for service in June, 1917, and was called 
into the service in February, 1918, first with the rank of first lieutenant, 
but later being promoted to a captaincy. He was sent to France in 
October, 1918, and returned in February, 1919, having spent the greater 



HISTORY OP McIIENRY COUNTY 607 

part of his time in a base hospital at St. Nazaire. Doctor Gooder 
belongs to the county, state and national medical societies, and has 
done constructive work in all. 

In 1907 Doctor Gooder was married to Vera Mason Smith, of Dixon, 
111., and they have one son, Jack. Doctor Gooder is a capable physician 
and a man of pleasing personality which wins for him many friends both 
in and out of his profession. 



JOHN GOODKNECHT. 



John Goodknecht, now deceased, was formerly one of the industrious 
and prosperous farmers of Chemung Township. He was born in 
Mechlinburg, Germany, and died in May, 1906, aged seventy-nine 
years, and is buried at Mt. Auburn Cemetery in McHenry County. 
Upon his arrival in the United States to which he journeyed in young 
manhood, he came to Woodstock, then the end of the railroad. Another 
member of the family went to Michigan, and still another to Iowa, but 
he remained in McHenry County, and worked for Austin Diggins at 
Harvard for several years. 

In 1856 he bought from Paschal P. Stiles the present farm of his 
son, Ernest, comprising 130 acres of land in Chemung Township, and 
on it he spent practically the remainder of his life. At the time he bought 
it a portion of it was covered with timber, the remainder being either 
prairie or low land, but he set to work with characteristic industry 
and persistence and finally developed it into a valuable property. 
During his later days he retired and moved to Harvard, where he died 
four or five years later, his widow surviving him for about eighteen 
months, and then died at the age of sixty-nine years. He never entered 
into local affairs, his time and interest being centered on his farm and 
family. For many years he was a member of the Lutheran church 
of Sharon, but when he went to Harvard, he transferred his membership 
to the Lutheran church of that city. The children born to him and 
his wife were as follows : Amelia, who is Mrs. Charles Walters of Water- 
loo, Iowa; Theodore, who is a carpenter and builder of Harvard; Emma, 
who is Mrs. Charles Englehardt of Boone County, 111. ; Maggie, who died 
at the age of twenty-one years; William, who is a farmer of Parkersburg, 
Iowa, and Ernest, whose name heads this review. 
Ernest Goodknecht has owned the farm for seventeen years, and since 



(ids HISTORY OF MclIENRY COl'NTY 

then has made many improvements, including the erection of a silo. 
He carries on dairying and lias from twelve to fifteen cows. His opera- 
tions are carried on very efficiently, and he is known as one of the pro- 
gressive men of his calling. A Republican, he contents himself with 
giving an intelligent support to the candidates of his party, his private 
affairs being too heavy to permit of his taking office. 

In February, 1909, he was united in marriage with Mildred Harrows, 
a daughter of D. A. Barrows, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in 
this work. Mr. and Mrs. Goodknecht have one son, John, who is eighl 
years old. Mr. Goodknecht is a native of the county, and has been 
educated in it. His interests are naturally centered in the development 
of this region, and he is a friend of the public schools and the good 
mads movement. Such men as he are a credit to their communities, 
and too much praise cannot be accorded them, for it is now an accepted 
fact that the farmers are the mainspring of the nation's prosperity. 



EDGAR E. GOODRICH. 

Edgar E. Goodrich, proprietor of the Marengo Steam Laundry and 
Dry Cleaning Works, is one of the substantial men of Marengo. He 
was born at Marengo, February 14, 1873, a son of Elias J. and Lucia 
(Morrill) Goodrich. Elias J. Goodrich was in a furniture and under- 
taking business at Marengo, with branches at Woodstock and Harvard, 
at the time 'of his son's birth, but about 1881 or 1882 he sold and went 
into a hotel and restaurant business, continuing it for some years, and 
becoming very well known in the county. In 1894 he moved to DeKalb, 
111., and spent five years, and then returned to Marengo, where he died 
in 1910, aged seventy-six years. His widow survives him. Their chil- 
dren were as follows: Ella, who is the widow of a Mr. Pettibone, lives 
at Council Bluffs, Iowa; Walter, who is a hotel man at Council Bluffs, 
Iowa; Estelle, who is Mrs. George Bates of Marengo; Edgar E., whose 
name heads this review; Mrs. Bessie Meehan, who lives at Chicago; 
Ernest W., who lives at Rockford; and Ruth, who is Mrs. I. 0. Hunger- 
ford of Brooklyn, N. Y. Mr. Hungerford is superintendent of the 
eastern branch of Borden's Milk Co. His first job was secured for him 
by E. E. Goodrich with Borden's, and he proved so capable that he 
was made superintendent of the Borden plant at McHenry, later becom- 
ing county superintendent for the company. He was then transferred 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 609 

to Chicago, then to Montreal, and finally was made general superin- 
tendent of all the eastern business of the company with headquarters 
at Brooklyn, N. Y. 

In 1891 the Marengo Steam Laundry was founded by W. H. Fisher, 
and in 1895 Edgar E. Goodrich bought it and he has improved it until 
it is now thoroughly modern and equipped with the latest machinery 
and devices for the conduct of the business. Realizing the need for a 
reliable dry cleaning establishment, Mr. Goodrich organized this branch 
of his business over twelve years ago and enjoys a fine trade in both 
branches. He gives constant employment to five persons. 

At the age of twenty-one Mr. Goodrich was married to Maud 
Winegar of Marengo, who died in April, 1906, leaving two children, 
namely: Fern, who is Mrs. Harry C. Gilkerson of Marengo; and Pauline, 
who died in childhood. In 1910, Mr. Goodrich was married (second) to 
Frances Fisk of Detroit, Mich., and they have no children. Several 
years ago Mr. Goodrich built his present brick residence, which is very 
modern and convenient. 

A Republican, he has served as a member of the city council, and 
while holding that office was instrumental in securing for Marengo its 
present ornamental lights. At present he is worshipful master of 
Marengo Lodge No. 138, A. F. & A. M. Always interested in civic 
matters, he finds the Community Club an effective channel through 
which to achieve improvements, and is a forceful member of it. 



EPHRIAM R. GOODROW. 

Ephriam R. Goodrow, senior member of the firm of Goodrow & 
Son, is one of the substantial business men of Woodstock, and one who 
stands unusually high in public esteem throughout McHenry County. 
He was born in Wisconsin, July 12, 1861, a son of Eli and Hannah 
(Penwell) Goodrow, who had eight children. Eli Goodrow was born 
in France, but came to the United States in 1840, and located in Jeffer- 
son County, Wis., where he was engaged very successfully in farming 
until his death, in 1882. His widow survived him until 1915. 

Ephriam R. Goodrow attended the common and high schools of 
his native state, and came to McHenry County in 1901, establishing 
whi I was known as the Hitch Harness Company, which in 1916 was 
< ::; ;indcd into an automobile business, and the name changed to Good- 



610 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

row & Son. The firm carries farm implements, milking machines, 
buggies, wagons, oils, gasoline, whips, blankets, robes and automobiles, 
and carry on a first-class garage, and employment is given three people. 
Mr. Goodrow has the exclusive agency of the Overland car for his 
neighborhood, and carries a stock valued at $10,000. 

Mr. Goodrow was united in marriage with Miss Mary Cook, a 
daughter of Albert Cook, and a member of a prominent family of Wis- 
consin. Mr. and Mrs. Goodrow became the parents of the following 
children: Frank J., who is in business with his father; Eva, who is 
Mrs. William Onus of Chicago; Etta, who is Mrs. John Hayes; Tcssic 
M., who is Mrs. Howard Cos of Wisconsin; and Loraine, who is com- 
pleting her studies at the University of Wisconsin. Mr. Goodrow and 
his family are consistent members of the Roman Catholic church. In 
politics he is a Republican. A man of unusual business energy, he has 
forged ahead, and has honestly earned his present prestige. 



FRANK J. GOODROW. 



Frank J. Goodrow, junior member of the well known garage and 
implement firm of Goodrow <fc Son, is one of the alert young business 
men of Woodstock. He was born in Wisconsin, January 8, 1889, a 
son of Ephraim and Mary (Cook) Goodrow, also natives of Wisconsin, 
and grandson of Eli and Hannah (Penwell) Goodrow and Albert Cook, 
all of whom are well known and universally respected. 

Frank J. Goodrow was educated in the schools of Wisconsin and 
Woodstock, being about twelve years of age when his father established 
himself in business at the latter place, so that practically he has been 
reared in McHenry County, and naturally his interests are centered 
here. In 1916, Mr. Goodrow was taken into partnership by his father, 
and has participated actively in the business ever since. A complete 
line of agricultural implements, wagons, buggies and automobile accesso- 
ries is carried to the amount of $10,000 and the firm is sole agent for the 
Overland cars in McHenry County. 

Mr. Goodrow was united in marriage with Miss Helen Goff, a 
daughter of Fred Goff. In politics, like his father, Mr. Goodrow is a 
staunch Republican. He belongs to the Roman Catholic church. 
A young man of progressive ideas, he has thrown himself into his busi- 
ness, and while achieving material success, is also gaining the confidence 



HISTORY OP McHENRY COUNTY 611 

of those with whom he does business because of his high principles and 
honorable methods. 



MUNSON SMITH GOODSELL. 

Munson Smith Goodsell, now deceased, was in former years one of 
the substantial men of McHenry County and was the first merchant of 
Hebron. He was born at Cooperstown, N. Y., November 23, 1826, 
and died April 21, 1910, aged seventy-three years. On January 10, 1858, 
he was married to Annie Marie Arnold, at Elkton, Wis. She was born 
February 9, 1839, a daughter of Giles and Iris Welton (Hickox) Arnold, 
of Victor, Ontario County, N. Y., where Mrs. Goodsell wa? born. Prior 
to 1844, Giles Arnold came west to Wisconsin and securing a home, 
returned to New York for his family, who made the trip in 1844. 

Munson Smith Goodsell attended Beloit College, and when his 
father died in 1861, took charge of his store, later selling it and moving 
to Hebron, where in June of that year he erected a building and in it 
established the first store and post office of the village. At that time 
there were but two frame houses in the settlement. Mr. Goodsell con- 
tinued to operate the store until about 1880. He was also interested 
in a lumber yard conducted by him and his partner Henry Mead. Mr. 
Goodsell was the first postmaster of Hebron, and held that office for 
a quarter of a century, and he was township clerk for twenty-three 
years. For thirty years he served as township assessor, and was holding 
that office at the time of his death. He was a specially capable business 
man, reliable and upright. Not a talker, he carried out his ideas in deeds, 
and had the welfare of his community at heart. Politically he was a 
Republican. He was made a Mason at Richmond, soon after coming 
to the county, and was a charter member of the Hebron Lodge, his 
funeral being in charge of his brothers in the lodge. 

The one surviving daughter of Mr. Goodsell is Annie West Snitz, 
who lives at St. Petersburg, Fla., her husband having been a prominent 
real estate dealer in Cleveland, Ohio. The other daughter, Iris, married 
on March 14, 1887, Charles Q. Albertson, and died within a year, being 
then but twenty years of age. She was a lovely girl, bright and capable, 
and her loss was mourned by her family and her host of friends. The 
only son, Lewis Burr Goodsell, was killed at Fox River Station, on the 
Northwestern Railroad, while coupling cars in his capacity of brakeman, 
December 7, 1881, being then twenty-three years old. Fannie G. died 



612 HISTORY OP McHENRI COUNTY 

.•it the age of one year. Mrs. Goodsell has lived in her present house 
since 1862, and lias lived to bury her husband and three children, who 

lie in the local cemetery. Both she and Mr. (I lsell parly connected 

themselves with the Episcopal church at Lake Geneva, but when they 
came to Hebron they interested themselves in the Methodist Presby- 
terian and Baptist denominations as there was no church of their own 
faith here. They were very liberal in their views, and sought only to 
further the spiritual welfare of their community. For some years since 
her husband's death, Mrs. Goodsell has spent the winters with her 
daughter in Florida, but retains her property and interest in Hebron. 
During the late w r ar she was active in Red Cross work, and all her life 
has always done more than her share of church and community work, 
and her many benefactions and unselfish efforts have endeared her to 
all who have the honor of her acquaintance. 



WILLIAM A. GOODWIN. 

William A. Goodwin, director of the United States Bank of Crystal 
Lake, one of the substantial and representative men of McHenry ( lounty, 
is also prominent politically. Lie was born in McHenry County, 
August 5, 1857, one of the four children born to John and Sarah C. 
(Chase) Goodwin. John Goodwin was born in Pennsylvania, but in 
1850 came to McHenry County, and was engaged in farming and man- 
ufacturing pickles in Algonquin Township, where he died in 1892, his 
wife passing away in 1908. 

William A. Goodwin attended the common and high schools of his 
native county, completing his studies at the Elgin Academy and the 
Indiana State Normal School. For the subsequent two years, Mr. 
Goodwin was engaged in farming, but then came to Crystal Lake, and 
embarked in a flour, feed and lumber business, and built a feed and flour 
mill which he still operates. He is also interested in handling stock, 
and owns considerable farm land, including 131 acres in Algonquin 
Township, and he also owns his residence at Crystal Lake. 

Mr. Goodwin was married to Miss Mary M. Rainthorp, and they 
have one living child, Benjamin S., the other child, Lora, having died. 
Mr. and Mrs. Goodwin are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
He is a very prominent Republican and served two terms in the city 
council, his record as an alderman making him the logical candidate for 



HISTORY OK McIIKNRY COUNTY 613 

mayor, to which office he was first elected on the Citizens ticket in 1907. 
He has also rendered efficient service on the school board, and has done 
much to bring about improvements in the school system in his city. 
Fraternally he is a Mason, and Odd Fellow and is active in both lodges. 
A man of unusual capabilities, he has exerted himself to make good in 
whatever he has undertaken, and his success is self-earned, and well 
merited. 



HENRY GORHAM. 



Henry Gorham, now deceased, was formerly one of the most repre- 
sentative men of Dorr Township, and a man widely and favorably known. 
He was born at St. Isaacs, on the St. Lawrence River, within thirty 
miles of Montreal, Canada, in December, 1855. His educational training 
ceased when he was fourteen years old, at which time he went to Vermont, 
and was engaged in farming near Fairfield until 1855, when, with a 
cousin, George La Chance, he came to Illinois, by railroad as far as 
Chicago, and thence to Kane County, where he continued to work at 
farming, being employed by George Sawyer of Dundee for three years. 
He then joined a party and crossed the plains to California, the trip 
consuming nearly five and one-half months. After about five years of 
varied experiences, during which period he met. with varying success, 
Mr. Gorham returned to Dundee by way of San Francisco and the 
Isthmus of Panama. 

On December 26 of the year of his return home, he was married to 
Judith Helen Sawyer, and they located on the old Sawyer homestead in 
Dorr Township, where they continued to reside until the death of Mr. 
Gorham on January 1, 1902, with the exception of fourteen months, 
when Mr. Gorham was in Kansas, homesteading 160 acres of land, and 
freighting to Emporia, Humboldt and other points. Returning home, 
he resumed his agricultural activities in Dorr Township. 

Mr. Gorham was a Republican of a stalwart type, but did not seek 
political preferment. He and his wife had the following children: 
Elmer S., who is engaged in farming in the vicinity of Crystal Lake, 
married Mary Myers and they have one son, Henry; William Henry, 
who lives at Woodstock; George F., who married Laura Thayer, has 
four children — George H., Edith, Helen and Hazel, and who is operating 
the old homestead; and Bertha, who married Richard Reed, a farmer 
living near Ridgefield, 111., and they have the following children— Pearl 
Marie, Clarence Edward and Dorothy. 



614 HISTORY OF .MdlKXRV OOl'NTY 

Mrs. Gorham was born at Bradford, Vt., January 9, 1842, a daughter 
of William and Savilla (Hayes) Sawyer, who were of English-Puritan 
ancestry. Savilla Hayes was horn at Strafford, Yt., January 3, 1811, a 
daughter of Robert and Abigail (Merrill) Hayes, the former of whom 
was a soldier of the American Revolution. Their children were as 
follows: David, John, Samuel, Sallie, Irene, Lydia, Roxamia, Elvira. 
Lucy (who died young) and Savilla. The Hayes family here referred to 
belonged to the same stock as Pres. Rutherford B. Hayes. 

William Sawyer, father of Mrs. Gorham, was born at Oxford, N. H., 
in November, 1807, a son of John and Judith (Webster) Sawyer, the 
ancestors of both having been among the very early settlers of New 
Hampshire. This branch of the Sawyer family belongs to the same stock 
as that of former Senator Sawyer of Wisconsin. Judith Webster was a 
second cousin of Daniel Webster. John Sawyer was killed at an early 
day in Canada. His son William Sawyer acquired what was for his day 
an excellent education, and always was an earnest student of history. 
In 1839 he was married to Savilla Hayes, and their children were as 
follows: Judith Helen, who married Henry Gorham; and George, who 
served as a soldier during the Civil War, as a member of Company F, 
Ninety-fifth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, but died a few months after his 
enlistment at Lake Providence, La. Mr. Sawyer was engaged in farming 
and the transportation of produce from his home town to Boston, Mass., 
by r way of the Connecticut River on flat boats made by himself. Later 
he bought a farm near Bradford, Vt., where he remained until 1840, at 
which time he moved to Bradford. In August, 1851, he came to 
McHenry County, 111., locating on eighty acres of land, which was un- 
improved except for a dilapidated log cabin. He improved this property 
and increased his farm until he owned 188 acres. His death occurred 
when he was eighty-one years of age, his w : idow surviving him until 
January 3, 1902, when she passed away, aged ninety-one years. She 
was a Methodist in religious belief, and very active in church work. 

Mis. Gorham has lived on her present farm since 1851, and is one of 
the oldest residents of the township. While not a member of any religious 
denomination, she is an attendant on the services of the Presbyterian 
Church, and takes an active part in the good work of that body as well 
as social organizations, having given liberally of her time and money to 
the Red Cross. 

George F. Goiham, son of Henry Gorman, took charge of the old 
homestead which formerly belonged to his grandfather Sawyer, and an 
additional farm of 158 acres two miles away from his original one, which 




ftfZ^M 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 615 

is owned by his mother. He specializes in milk production, his herd 
averaging twenty head. The present residence was erected in 1892 to 
replace the one destroyed by fire. The barn, 36 x 120 feet, is a modern 
structure, and other improvements are contemplated, for George F. 
Gorham is one of the progressive men of his calling who believes in having 
a first-class equipment in every particular. When the government asked 
the farmers for a greater wheat production, Mr. Gorham responded with 
a crop of 1,100 bushels in addition to his regular milk production. The 
Gorham family is one of the most representative ones in McHenry 
County, and George F. Gorham is living up to its highest standards. 



FLAVEL K. GRANGER. 
Page 138. 



HENRY F. GREELEY. 



Henry F. Greeley, one of the very prominent men of Richmond, 
owns two choice farms in Richmond Township, and has been interested 
along several commercial lines in this city. He was born in McHenry 
County, August 8, 1868, one of the nine children of Michael and Hannah 
(Waldron) Greeley. Michael Greeley came to McHenry County in 
1850, and for many years was engaged in farming. He lived to the 
unusual age of ninety-nine years, and was one of the most highly 
esteemed men of his locality. 

Henry F. Greeley was reared on his father's farm, and was given an 
excellent public school education. For some time he was engaged in 
farming, and then he went into a dairy business at Richmond, but later 
sold it. A staunch Democrat, he was the unsuccessful candidate of his 
party for the office of mayor of Richmond, being defeated both times by 
E. C. Covalt, although he ran way ahead of his ticket on account of his 
personal popularity. 

On November 9, 1910, Mr. Greeley was married to Miss Ariel V. 
Carnahan, a daughter of Mrs. Emma Gates, who was born in Pennsyl- 
vania. Mr. and Mrs. Greeley have two children, namely: Henrietta, 
who was born November 14, 1911; and Horace E., who was born August 



616 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

27, 1912. He has always given a prompt and loyal support to local 
measures which in his judgment would prove of benefit to the majority, 
and few men an- hold in higher esteem in their communities than he. 



CARL GUSE. 



Carl Guse, who is now living retired at Marengo, where he owns 
his comfortable residence, is one of the highly respected, thoroughly 
Americanized citizens of German birth. He was horn in Germany, 
January 20, 1856, and came to the United States in 1875, his mother 
accompanying him. After three months spent at Chicago, Mr. Guse, 
who had been reared on a farm, came to Riley Township to join a friend 
who had located here. His first work was as a harvest hand, and for 
four years he continued at farm labor, spending two of these years in 
the employ of Monroe Sears. Mr. Guse was then married to Therese 
Post, who had been born in the same village as he, and came to the 
United States on the same boat. She remained at Chicago until her 
marriage. 

When he married, Mr. Guse rented a farm in Riley Township and 
remained on it for four years, when he bought the farm adjoining it, 
known as the Tenrick farm of 160 acres, for which he paid $31 per 
acre, going heavily into debt to secure it, and it took him twenty years 
to clear off this obligation. However, he had a team and some stock, and 
gradually made things pay. Here he lived until 1915, when he retired. 
During the time he lived on this farm he had erected new buildings, and 
did considerable draining, at a cost of $2,300. 

To his original farm he added 100 acres, two and one-half miles 
distant, and put in $700 worth of drainage on it, operating the two 
farms. The buildings on his last purchase have also been erected by 
him. Dairying was his main interest, and he kept twenty-five or more 
cows. Of late years Mr. Guse sold his last farm to his son, but retains 
the other, having a tenant on it. 

Mr. and Mrs. Guse became the parents of the following children: 
Emma, who married Neil Hopkins, lives near Buffalo, X. Y.: Ella, 
who died at the age of thirty-three years; Rosa, who lives with her 
sister in New York; Will, who lives on his father's smaller farm, married 
Flossie McMackan, has one sohe, Walter ('., and owns 240 acres of 
land; Lena, who spent some years at Chicago, is now at home with 



HISTORY OF McIIENRY COUNTY 617 

her parents; Charles, who rents the old homestead, married Martha 
Schauer; Anna, who is employed at Chicago; and Fred, who is on the 
homestead. 

Soon after coming to this country, Carl Guse took out his papers 
of citizenship, and is a strong Republican. He was a school director for 
about twenty years. One of the original members of the Zion Lutheran 
church of Marengo, he has been one of its most generous contributors, 
and was on the building committee at the time the new church edifice 
was erected. Although living at some distance from the church, he has 
always attended its services, and outside of his family and farming, it 
has been his principal interest in life. Having lived in this country so 
many years, he has become thoroughly imbued with its principles, and 
is proud of it and of his choice which brought him to it in the full flush 
of his young manhood. 



CHARLES E. GUSE. 



Charles E. Guse, manager, treasurer and a stockholder of the old- 
established firm of Shurtleff & Peters of Union, operating as the Shurtleff 
& Peters Company, dealers in the Deering hay, feed and corn machines, 
tillage implements, corn cultivators, planters, shellers, knife grinders, 
motor trucks, feed grinder, threshing drills, cream separators, soil and 
gas engines, oil tractors, manure spreaders, ensilage cutters, farm 
wagons and trucks, twine, coal and feed, is one of the best known men 
in this section of the county. 

Charles E. Guse was born at Chicago, 111., July 22, 1876, a son of 
Herman and Amelia (Gluth) Guse. Herman Guse was born in Ger- 
many, but came to the United States in 1868, first locating at Chicago, 
where for twenty-four years he conducted a lumber business. Selling 
that, he came to McHenry County, and from 1892 has resided on a farm 
south of Marengo. He and his wife had nine children born to them. 

Charles E. Guse attended the Chicago schools, and was sixteen years 
old when he came to McHenry County. He engaged in farming, moving 
to a farm of his own at Union in 1901, but in 1912, became manager of 
his present firm, and has since held that responsible position. He employs 
three men in his establishment. 

On December 8, 1904, Mr. Guse was married to Miss Augusta 
Rechner, and they have two children, namely: Emil C, who was born 
September 29, 1905; and Martha, who was born January 10, 1907. In 



618 HISTORY OF McHENEY COUNTY 

politics Mr. Guse is a Republican, and lie has been president of the 

Union school board since 1914. During his occupancy of the office, 
the present modern schoolhouse was erected. He is also secretary of 
the fire department of Union. A member of St. John's Lutheran church, 
he is serving it as secretary. A live, progressive man, he gives to his 
community the same loyal, efficient service that he renders his business 
associates and is highly respected by all who know him. 



JOSEPH A. GUTII. 



Joseph A. Guth, a prosperous general farmer of Greenwood Town- 
ship, is a man who has developed his land and firmly established himself 
in public estimation. He was born in Hartland Township, this county, 
September 21, 1867, a son of George and Ellen (Long) Guth. George 
Guth was a son of Jacob Guth, and when the former was fourteen years 
old, his father brought him to the United States, and settled in Hart- 
land Township, where he became a farmer. Ellen Long was born in 
Ireland, a daughter of Dennis Long. The children of George Guth 
and his wife were as follows: Katherine, who was married to Edward 
Howard; Joseph A.; Thomas; Fred; and Margaret A., who is deceased. 

Joseph A. Guth was reared in Hartland Township, where he attended 
the district schools. When he began farming for himself, ho bought 
eighty acres of land on section 22, Greenwood Township, and here he 
has developed a valuable property. He was married at Chicago, Jan- 
uary 19, 1898, to Margaret Keefe, born September 6, 1870, in Hartland 
Township, where she was reared. Her parents w r ere Edmund and 
Bridget (Davis) Keefe, natives of Ireland. Mr. and Mrs. Keefe had 
the following children: Katherine, John, Richard, William, Joseph, who 
died at the age of thirty years, Mrs. Guth, who is deceased; Anna, who 
is Mrs. William McGee and Edward. Mr. and Mrs. Guth have the 
following children: Grace F., George, Edmund, J. Walter, Margaret E. 
and Edna. In politics he is independent in his views. The family are 
members of the Catholic church. 



ROBERT E. HAEGER. 



Robert E. Haeger, supervisor of Algonquin Township, is one of the 
leading stockbreeders of the state, ami his work in developing the Hoi- 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 619 

stein strain of cattle has made him known from coast to coast. For 
many years he has been a resident of Algonquin, and was born in Algon- 
quin Township, on his father's farm, May 5, 1875, a son of Robert W. 
and Mary (Jayne) Haeger, the former of whom, born in German}', was 
brought by his parents to the United States when a lad of eight years, in 
1857, and with them settled on a farm near Spring Lake, McHenry 
County, 111. There he was reared and resided until 1895, in the mean- 
while in 1876, starting one of the first Holstein herds in Illinois. In 
1895, Robert W. Haeger moved to Algonquin, where he died January 
19, 1901, his wife having passed away March 21, 1893, and they were 
the parents of six children. 

Robert E. Haeger attended the common and high schools of Mc- 
Henry County, and when he was twenty years of age began handling- 
stock, and has been connected with the stock industry in various branches 
ever since. In young manhood he became a professional ball player, 
and was one of the pitchers of the Pelican team of New Orleans of the 
Southern League, and was also in the Interstate League and later the 
Eastern League. In 1898 Mr. Haeger took up auctioneering and has 
attained to a national reputation in this line. In 1911 he was elected 
on the Republican ticket supervisor of Algonquin Township, and still 
holds that office. For many years he has been alderman of Algonquin, 
and is admittedly one of its foremost men, his volume of business aggre- 
gating $100,000 annually. His extensive stock barns are located at 
Algonquin. Mr. Haeger has, in the past twelve years, developed the 
champion show herd of Holstein cattle in the world. In 1890 he did 
his first auctioneering, taking it up as a regular line of business in 1898, 
and owing to his lifetime experience with Holsteins, his services have 
naturally been in demand at the biggest sales of blooded stock in the 
country. He has received the highest price ever paid for male and 
female animals in the United States. Mr. Haeger has rendered his 
services as auctioneer all over the United States and Canada, and is 
one of the best-known men in the stock industry. 

On May 28, 1901, Mr. Haeger was married to Miss Ruth M. Ycrkcs, 
a daughter of Frank Yerkes, one of the leading men of Algonquin, and 
they have one son, Robert Douglas, who was born March 12, 1912. 
Mr. and Mrs. Haeger belong to the Congregational church.' A potent 
factor in the development of his community, Mr. Haeger displays in 
every way his business ability and public spirit, and no man in the 
county or state is more popular than he. 



620 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

ALVA II. HALE. 

Alva II. Hale, supervisor of Nunda Township, and a very successful 
operator of farm lands, lives at Crystal Lake, where lie and his family 
are regarded as being among its most essential citizens. He was horn 
in Nunda Township, October 22, 1869, only son of Osman M. and 
Lurelia (Webster) Hale. Osman M. Hale was one of the prosperous 
fanners of Nunda Township, whose death occurred December 29, 1909. 
His widow survives. 

Alva H. Hale attended the grammar and high schools of McHenry 
County, and has been a resident of Crystal Lake since he was seventeen 
years old. After completing his school life, he embarked in a grocery- 
business at Crystal Lake and continued in it for fifteen years, having 
learned the business as clerk while attending school. In 1906, he began 
dealing in farm implements. In December 1911, he was appointed super- 
visor to fill out the unexpired term of deputy sheriff Ben Troop, and 
the next spring he was elected to the same office. He also served as 
a member of the city council of Crystal Lake for one term, and was 
township treasurer of Nunda Township for several years. Mr.- Hale 
served on the school board of Crystal Lake for fifteen years, and has 
always been a strong Republican. 

On June 6, 1S94, Mr. Hale was married to Miss May G. Hamilton, 
a daughter of William T. Hamilton, and a member of one of the old 
families of Crystal Lake. Mr. and Mrs. Hale have two children, namely: 
Marion L. and Hamilton 0. Mr. Hale has under his direction nearly 
1,000 acres of land in the county. All this property is in Nunda 
Township. Mrs. Hale owns the. beautiful residence at Crystal Lake 
which was elected at a cost of $10,000. Mr. Hale's fraternal affiliations 
are with the Masons and Modern Woodmen of America. His long 
association with the public affairs of his city and township has given 
him a valuable experience and affairs of moment placed in his hands are 
certain to receive capable and immediate attention. 



WILLIAM D. HALL. 



William D. Hall, one of the most prominent men of McHenry ( Ounty, 
is senior member of the lumber firm of Hall & Eckert of Harvard, and 
vice president of the Harvard State Bank. He was born in Wisconsin, 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 621 

September 3, 1850, one of four children born to Henry and Lucy (Clark) 
Hall. Henry Hall was born in New York state, in 1813, and his wife 
was a native of the same state. After their marriage, they moved to 
Wisconsin, and later located in McHenry County, where he died July 1, 
1884, his widow surviving him until June, 1903. 

William D. Hall attended the public schools of Wisconsin, Walworth 
Academy, and the Chicago University. After completing his studies, 
Mr. Hall embarked in a lumber business at Harvard, and from then, 
1873, to the present time has been associated with its development, the 
annual business now aggregating $80,000. Mr. Hall also owns a choice 
farm of 107 acres in Wisconsin. In 1910, the value of his connection 
with the Harvard State Bank was recognized, and he was made its vice 
president. 

On November 29, 1889, Mr. Hall was married to Miss Euretta 
Young, a daughter of Henry Young of Albany, Vt., and they have 
one son, William H., who is completing his studies at the Beloit, Wis., 
College, having already been graduated from the Northwestern Military 
Academy at Lake Geneva, in 1918. Mr. Hall belongs to Harvard Lodge 
No. 309, A. F. & A. M., and is also a Knight Templar. A Republican, 
he was elected mayor of Harvard for one term, and has also served in 
the city council, being one of the most public spirited officials the city 
has ever had. Mr. Hall is one of the wealthy men of Harvard, but he is 
something more, for he is one of the most popular and highly respected, 
for it is generally recognized that his ample means have come through 
legitimate channels, and as the result of honorable business methods, 
directed by unusual sagacity and knowledge of existing conditions. 



JOHN C. HALLISY. 



John C. Hallisy, one of the honored retired farmers of Woodstock, 
was born in Hartland Township, March 8, 1848, a son of John and Mary 
(Walsh) Hallisy, both born in County Cork, Ireland, but married at 
Newark, N. J. John Hallisy was engaged as boss of a gang of workmen 
on the construction work of the Illinois and Michigan Canal, and being 
pleased with the outlook in McHenry County, took up land in the timber 
at Hartland Township on section 22, settling on his farm in May, 1841. 

Two brothers of John Hallisy, Timothy and Daniel, took up land 
adjoining his and all three spent the remainder of their lives on their 



622 HISTORY OF McIIENRY COUNTY 

farms, John dying at the age of sixty-four years; Daniel at the age of 
seventy, and Timothy at the advanced age of ninety-three years. Mrs. 
D. F. Coakley, of Woodstock, is a granddaughter of Timothy Hallisy. 
These brothers were among the tirsl settlers in Hart land Township, and 
were followed by another brother, Cornelius, who also died in the town- 
ship at the age of eighty-seven years. All of these brothers were original 
members of St. Patrick's Catholic Church, which was started in 1846. 
Prior to that year services were held at the home of Andrew Donnelly. 
Rev. Father Hampston was the first resident priest, and he was later 
succeeded by Father Eagan, who served the parish for twenty-five years. 

The wife of John Ilallisy survived him many years, living to be ninety- 
nine years old, during her last years being tenderly cared for by her 
daughter, Mrs. Hannah Deneen, of Marengo Township. The children 
of John Hallisy and his wife were as follows: Hannah, who is Mrs. 
Deneen; Elizabeth, wdio is the widow of Nicholas Grady, who died at 
Woodstock in 1916; Mary, who is Mrs. Timothy Deneen, of Woodstock; 
Anna, who is the widow of Roderick Cooney, who died fourteen years 
ago, and she lives at Woodstock; and John C, who was the youngest. 

John C. Hallisy remained with his father until his death, and then 
bought the home farm of 312 acres to which he added until it is now over 
400 acres, and improved it so that it is one of the best rural properties in 
the township. It is especially adapted for milk production. While he 
had charge of the farm he kept a herd of from thirty to forty Durham 
cows. In 1910 he turned the operation of the farm over to his sons. To 
one son he gave a fine tract of ninety acres. He had erected two barns 
and silos, drained and tiled his property, and put in all the improvements 
he deemed necessary to make it fitted for dairying purposes. All of his 
mature years he has been a Democrat. He is a Catholic by inheritance 
and conviction and connected with St. Patrick's parish. 

John C. Hallisy was married to Bridget E. Wallace, a daughter of 
Thomas and Margaret Wallace, who were born in Ireland. She was 
born in McHenry Township, March 6, 1S59, although the greater part of 
her life has been passed in Hartland Township. Mr. and Mrs. Hallisy 
became the parents of the following children: John, who married 
Margaret Hurley, has three children — John C, Margaret M., and 
Edward R., is engaged in farming near the old farm; James, who married 
Margaret Castetter, has these children — J. Francis, Robert and Dorothy 
E., on the homestead; Mary, who is Mrs. John Flavin, of Chicago; 
Margaret, who married Roy Cowlen, a merchant of Hartland Station; 




A 







HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 623 

Florence, who is Mrs. Charles Croak, of Chicago, has a daughter, Lois J. ; 
Edward, who is with his brother James; George, who is a student attend- 
ing the Woodstock High School; and William H. and Hannah L., who 
are deceased. 

Coming as he does of fine old pioneer stock, Mr. Hallisy is one of the 
representative men of McHenry County, and during a long and useful 
life he has contributed much toward upbuilding his community. He 
has not desired to enter the public arena, but has rather endeavored to 
do his duty as a citizen in private, carefully considering problems as 
they have come up and voting upon them conscientiously according 
to his best judgment. He has reared a fine family who are doing him 
and his wife credit, and sustaining the reputation of the name and devel- 
oping into desirable and constructive citizens, whose work is always 
directed toward the securing of community betterment and better living 
cond'tions. 



THEODORE HAMER. 



Theodore Hamer, county recorder of McHenry County, and a director 
of the McHenry County National Bank of Woodstock, has long been 
recognized as one of the leading men of McHenry County. He was born 
in Germany, February 9, 1869, a son of Claus H. and Anna (Giese) 
Hamer, who had five children, four of whom survive. Claus H. Hamer 
was a shoemaker by trade, and worked at his calling all his life. 

Theodore Hamer left Germany in 1883, and in 1886 he located in 
McHenry County. After obtaining his citizen's papers, he became a 
strong Republican, and his services to his party were recognized by his 
election to the office of circuit clerk, after he had served for some time 
as deputy county clerk. Later, he was elected county recorder, and his 
present deputies are William T. Conn and Miss Emma Shearer. 

In 1892 Mr. Hamer was married to Miss Emma Shearer, a daughter 
of George Shearer, and they have four children. The family all belong 
to the Presbyterian church, in which they take an active part. Frater- 
nally, Mr. Hamer belongs to the Masons, Odd Fellows and Modern 
Woodmen of America. A very efficient and painstaking official, he gives 
universal satisfaction, and is held in the highest esteem throughout the 
county, where he is recognized as a loyal citizen and most excellent man. 



624 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

FRANK E. HANAFORD. 

Frank E. Hanaford, one of the retired citizens of Woodstock, was 
formerly actively engaged in teaming work in McHenry County. He 
was horn at Newhampton, N. II., December 8, 1842, a son of Aaron and 
Sarah (Curtis) Hanaford, natives of New Hampshire and Vermont, 
respectively, who were married in the latter state. The Hanaford 
family originated in England, representatives of it coming to New 
Hampshire at an early day. A Captain Hanaford commanded a company 
of New Hampshire men during the American Revolution. 

A brother of Aaron Hanaford, Milton, came to Illinois about 1850, 
settling at Huntley, where he was later joined by the former. Aaron 
Hanaford and his wife had the following children: Mary Elizabeth, who 
married Morris Parks, died in the state of Washington, in 1918, aged 
eighty-two years; Frank E. ; and Isadora, who is Mrs. Kimbally of 
Woodstock. 

Frank E. Hanaford was fifteen years of age when the family located 
in McHenry County, and he lived with his father until he enlisted in 
1861, in Company A, Fifteenth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, in response 
to the first call of President Lincoln, and served during the Civil War as 
a brave soldier. He has long belonged to the local post of the Grand 
Army of the Republic, and has attended several national encampments. 
enjoying meeting his old comrades in this way. 

In 1865 Frank E. Hanaford was married to Melissa Sears of Seneca 
Township, born in New York, who was brought to McHenry County 
when a child by her parents, Clark and Abigail Sears. They settled in 
Seneca Township, where both died at an advanced age, Mrs. Hanaford 
being the only survivor of her family. Mr. and Mrs. Hanaford became 
the parents of the following children: Edward, who lives at Woodstock, 
is a dealer in oil and gas; Mabel, who married W. H. Monroe, lives at 
Humbolt, Iowa; Frank C, who conducted the leading teaming and 
draying business at Woodstock, retired some years ago; and Ida M., 
who is actively engaged in church* work. One daughter, Maud, died in 
young womanhood. The surviving daughters have always taken an 
active part in church work and social life. This is one of the best-known 
families in the county. The pleasant home at No. 442 South Street. 
was built by Mr. Hanaford in 1868, and it has long been a favorite 
gathering place for the friends of the family. Mr. Hanaford himself is 
a well-known, thoroughly reliable and highly respected citizen, and a 
man who commands confidence wherever he is known. 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 625 

In connection with his experiences as a soldier during the Civil War 
Mr. Hanaford relates an account of the escape of himself and Ben 
Gardner, from Wauconda, 111.; Marvin Sheldon, from Crystal Lake, 
111.; Daniel Burton, from Woodstock, 111.; Andrew LaCelle, from Wood- 
stock, 111.; who were prisoners of the Confederacy. On October 4, 1864, 
he was captured near Ackworth, Ga., and taken across the Chattahoochee 
River, and after several changes was confined at Andersonville. At that 
time there were from 8,000 to 10,000 prisoners in the cramped quarters. 
Even at this day he recalls with distinction the horrors of that prison 
with its inadequate and miserable food and unsanitary conditions. The 
prisoners were unsufficiently clad, their wounds were neglected and 
deaths were many and frequent. Mr. Hanaford was one of those de- 
tailed to assist in removing each morning those who had died during 
the previous night. He was there for one month, and from all that he 
observed he states it as his firm belief that no one ever really escaped 
from that stronghold. 

Fearing the advance of General Sherman, the Confederates took 
detachments of prisoners to Savannah, Ga., and from there Mr. Hana- 
ford and his companions after three or four days were run into the pine 
woods ninety to ninety-five miles southwest of Savannah, and placed 
under guard. Once more the prisoners were moved, and finally while 
in camp, near Thomasville, Ga., nearly 100 miles away from the Union 
forces, the five men above referred to, made their escape on December 11. 
All were members of the Fifteenth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. These 
five men had only a pint of beans, one pint of cornmeal, a little salt, 
and one tin cup by way of equipment and supplies. They had planned 
to travel by night, which they did, excepting about two miles and lay 
in the swamps by day. Chickens and sweet potatoes were the principal 
living which they foraged during the night, usually finding plenty, but 
never getting very hungry, never asking for help, and their hardships 
were pitiful. Finally on January 2, 1865, twenty-two days after their 
escape the five reached the flag fort on the Island of Fernandina, and 
they imported to the provost marshal, who provided for their needs. 
From there they finally took a steamboat to Hilton Head, S. C, and 
from there went up to Beaufort, S. C. There through some misunder- 
standing these brave soldiers were held for examination by a subordinate, 
but when the adjutant-general of the Seventeenth Army Corps had the 
matter called to his attention, he relieved the subordinate from duty, 
and gave the escaped prisoners a thirty-day furlough. From there they 
went north to New York City, and the Soldiers Home. They were 



626 HISTORY OF .M.IIKXHY COUNTY 

sent to Chicago by way of Cleveland, and then on home. In June, he 
wont to Springfield to be mustered out of the service, but as hi- papers 

had not arrived, after two weeks of waiting, returned home. Finally 
he was mustered out July 20. 

It is impossible to give in so restricted a space the many intensely 
interesting incidents told by Mr. Hanaford with reference to this thrilling 
escape. He has related all of this in a most interesting narrative called 
"War. Prison and Escape," which ought to be given to the public in 
some permanent form by him on account of its truthfulness and general 
interest. He states that his comrades LaCelle and Sheldon are dead 
and that the former's daughter Eva married his son Frank. 



AUGUST HAHX. 



August Hahn, a farmer whose prosperity has been self-gained, is a 
man who is highly respected in Chemung Township where his property 
is located, it being seven miles northwest of Harvard. He was born 
at White Oak, Chemung Township, two miles from his present farm, 
April 24, 1865, a son of Lewis and Mary (Randt) Hahn, natives of 
Saxony, Germany, who were married in Illinois. 

Lewis Hahn had come to the United States during the early sixties, 
and worked for Austin Diggins of Harvard, and while thus employed 
he hauled the first load of lumber used in the building of the village. 
His wife was a sister of Dera Randt, the mother of Ernest Goodknecht, 
a sketch of whom is given elsewhere in this work. After their marriage, 
Lewis Hahn and his wife worked on the farm of Abe Carmack and then 
rented land for awhile. At last he bought eighty acres of land, going 
into debt for it all. A few acres were cleared and there was a log house 
on the property, but before he retired to Sharon, he had put the property 
into fine shape. His death occurred at Sharon in 1910, aged seventy-two 
his wife having passed away in 1909. Lewis Hahn added to his original 
farm until he had 110 acres in the home place, and he also bought 
120 acres now occupied by August Hahn, about 1S87. He had two 
children, namely: August, whose name heads this review; and Lydia 
Lora Hahn. who resides at Harvard, but owns the homestead. The 
parents are buried in the Burr Oak Cemetery in Boone County near 
their old home. They were devout members of the Lutheran church of 
Harvard, and Mr. Halm helped to build the new church edifice. 

August Hahn remained at home until he came to his present farm 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 627 

twenty-five years ago. On February 19, 1894, he was united in marriage 
with Bena Zimmerman, a daughter of John and Bena Zimmerman, now 
living retired at Sharon. Both were born in Bavaria, Germany, and 
there married, coming to the United States in 1883. Mr. Hahn had 
been renting land for six years prior to his marriage, but then moved 
on this property which has been his home ever since. To it he has 
added what was the Jim Barnes farm of sixty acres on the north, for 
which he paid $60 per acre, and the Banner farm of sixty acres to the 
north of his second farm, for which he paid $77 per acre. His property 
is all in one farm, and here he carries on dairying and grain farming, 
keeping fifteen cows. Mr. Hahn has erected a silo and outbuildings, 
and makes other improvements as they are needed, for he takes great 
pride in his property and seeks to keep it in tiptop condition. In 1914 
he built a new house on an elevation that commands a magnificent 
view of the surrounding country, and it is thoroughly modern in every 
respect, being supplied with hot and cold running water, a heating 
plant and electric light. One-half the basement is used for the heating 
plant and the other half as a garage. His farm machinery is of the latest 
design, and operated by a tractor of six plow capacity. In fact every- 
thing about this finely improved farm bespeaks the efficiency of the 
owner and his adoption of modern methods in everything he undertakes. 
For two seasons he has operated a threshing outfit with customary suc- 
cess. Politically he is a Republican. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hahn have the following children: Louis August, 
who is in partnership with his father, was drawn on the first draft, 
reclassified, but on the second draft was called, and was ready to go 
when the Armistice was signed-, married Martha Royce; Perley Albert, 
who is at home; and Jesse, who is working at Piano, 111. A great believer 
in farm life, Mr. Hahn has brought up his sons to this calling, and they 
are proving that not only is it a very important industry, but a paying 
one as well. 



H. S. HANCHETT. 
Page 138. 

CHARLES W. HARRISON. 

Charles W. Harrison, proprietor of the Meadow Lawn Stock Farm 
one of the most finely developed rural properties in McHenry Township, 



628 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

was bom April 17, 1S(>7, :il the home of his uncle John Harrison, and 
until lie was two years old lived with this uncle, who loved him as 
though he had been his own son. When he attained to man's estate, 
he began working for Richard Carr, on a farm he now owns. 

On March 20, 1SS9, Charles W. Harrison was married to Ella Hotch- 
kiss, a daughter of George W. and Helen (Boone) Hotchkiss, natives of 
New York and Kentucky, respective^. The Boone family came to 
McIIenry County at an early day as did the Hotchkisses, and Ella 
Hotchkiss was born at Greenwood. Following his marriage, Mr. Harrison 
rented the Carr farm for five years, and then bought it, living on it until 
1911, when he retired to Ringwood, where he had a house built by his 
uncle, Charles Harrison, and occupied by him as a residence for many 
years. This house is located on one of the pleasantest spots for a home 
in this region, and in the yard are sixteen fine old oak trees, relics of the 
days when much of the higher land in McHenry County was covered 
with a heavy growth of magnificent timber. 

The farm, formerly known as the Carr property, contains 155 acres 
of land, and has been known as the Meadow Lawn Stock Farm, since 
Mr. Harrison assumed charge of it. He erected the present house and 
barns, and it is now devoted to dairy purposes, his son, Chauncey L., 
conducting it along the same lines as his father. For thirty years Mr. 
Harrison was engaged in breeding thoroughbred Holstein cattle, keeping 
fifty head of pure breed, and his product has been exhibited at the 
fairs held at Freeport, 111., Elkhart, Wis., and other points, and secured 
many honors. Sales of the stock were held annually, and shipments 
for breeding purposes were made to countries as far distant as Japan. 
Mr. Harrison was one of the first farmers to have a herd of pure-bred 
Holstein cattle in McIIenry County. He carries on his stock business 
in partnership with his son, but does not supervise other of the opera- 
tions, feeling that he deserves a little leisure. He has never aspired 
to enter public life. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harrison became the parents of the following children: 
Chauncey L.; and Ethel F., who is Mrs. Lonnie L. Smith, lives near 
Ringwood. The son was married to Myrtle Wattles, a daughter of Frank 
Wattles, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work. Chauncey L. 
Harrison and his wife have two children, namely: Francis and Helen. 
Charles W. Harrison is a member of McHenry Lodge, A. F. & A. M.: 
Woodstock Chapter, R. A. M.; Woodstock Commandery, K. T.; and 
Medinah Temple, Mystic Shrine, Chicago, and is past master of Mc- 
IIenry lodge. He also belongs to Greenwood Camp, M. W. A. His son 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 629 

is also a Blue Lodge, Chapter and Commandery Mason. The Harrison 
family is one of the oldest and most highly respected ones in McHenry 
County, and its members are held in the highest regard in this and other 
counties. 



CLAYTON C. HARRISON. 

Clayton C. Harrison, one of the substantial farmers of McHenry 
County, owns a fine farm in McHenry Township, nine miles east of 
Woodstock. He was born on the old Harrison farm west of Ringwood, 
May 29, 1872, a son of William Harrison, now deceased, and was there 
reared. 

On April 6, 1897, Clayton C. Harrison was married to Flora Sher- 
burne, born east of McHenry, a daughter of Robert H. and Sarah M. 
(Colby) Sherburne. Robert H. Sherburne was born in New Hampshire, 
February 3, 1832, and on his mother's side of the house belonged to the 
old Eaton family of New Hampshire. He died December 11, 1909. 
When he was nineteen years old, he was married at Boston, Mass., to 
Bessie Stocker, soon thereafter moving to Green Bay, Wis., then a 
trading post, where he was employed by the United States government 
in making surveys. Later he returned to Concord, N. H. In the 
meanwhile the Stocker family had come to McHenry County, settling 
on the River road south of McHenry, and Robert H. Sherburne and his 
wife followed them in either 1856 or 1857, and here Mrs. Sherburne 
died soon after the close of the Civil War, leaving a family of small 
children. 

On January 1, 1869, Mr. Sherburne was married (second) to Sarah 
Colby, a daughter of Ira Colby, one of the pioneers of McHenry County. 
Sarah Colby was born at Danville, Va., August 16, 1833, but when six 
years old was brought to McHenry County, and for some years was her 
father's housekeeper, as her mother died when she was young. After 
his second marriage, Mr. Sherburne lived for two years on a farm east 
of McHenry, and then in 1871 moved on the farm of 160 acres now 
occupied by Mr. and Mrs. Harrison, and remained there until 1894, 
when he retired to McHenry and there died. During the time he was 
on the farm, he worked hard to develop it, and through his efforts it 
has become a very valuable property, although all of his buildings have 
been replaced by Mr. Harrison with more modern ones. Mr. Sherburne 
was on the school board nearly all of the time he lived in McHenry 



630 HISTORY OF BfcHENRY COUNTY 

Township, and he also served as road commissioner. He was a well- 
read man, and a supporter of Republican principles and candidates. 
For years he attended the services of the Methodist Episcopal church at 
McHenry, where his wife attended. By his first marriage Mr. Sherburne 
had the following children: .Maria, who is the widow of William Wilson, 
lives at Maeon, 111.; Mary, who is Mrs. O. E. Churchill, lives at Liberty- 
ville, 111.: Roberta, who is the widow of Milo Wheden, lives at Fort 
Smith. Ark.; Anna, who lives with her stepmother; Robert, who is a 
farmer of Albion, Boone County, Neb.; Ruth, who married E. J. Mans- 
lield. died in young womanhood; Fred, who married Lulu Colby, operated 
the Sherburne farm for a time, but died after he was thirty, and is 
survived by his widow. Mrs. Harrison is the only child born of her 
father's second marriage. 

For six years after his marriage, Clayton C. Harrison conducted the 
old Harrison farm, and then sixteen years ago came to the Sherburne 
farm, where he has since resided. In 1915 he erected the present fine 
modern residence, the barn having been built in 1914. The latter is 
34 x 96 feet, with stabling in the basement, and there is also a large silo 
on the place. Dairying is the main feature, and his herd is composed of 
registered Holstein cattle. He also sells breeding animals. A Re- 
publican, he has served on the school board for about sixteen years. 
Mrs. Harrison is a Methodist, attending service at Ringwood, three 
miles away. Mr. and Mrs. Harrison have the following children: 
Margaret, who has been a teacher for two years, is meeting with the 
same success as did her mother, who was also in the educational field 
prior to her marriage; Florence Sue; Mary, who is attending Beloit 
College; William; Ella and James. The four eldest children have been 
graduated from the McHenry High School, and the younger ones give 
promise of being equally intellectual. 

The Harrison home is one of the nicest ones in McHenry County, 
and Mr. Harrison pursues his farm work according to the most modern 
methods known to agriculture. Both he and his wife are very popular, 
and deservedly so, and they are splendid representatives of some of the 
best pioneer stock of this region. 



ELLERY A. HARRISON. 

Ellen- A. Harrison, one of the progressive farmers of Hartland 
Township, is located two miles wist of Woodstock where he is carrying 



o^ 






£- 




HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 631 

on dairying and general farming. He was born in the village of Mc- 
Henry, May 3, 1SG1, a son of William and Jeanette (Thayer) Harrison, 
he born in England in 1822, died at the age of seventy-two years; 
and she, born in 1828, died in 1896 when sixty-eight years old. He was 
brought to the United States when a child, and was reared in Oneida 
County, N. Y., from whence he came to McHenry County, 111., after 
his marriage, and all of his children were born in Illinois. The first 
land he bought was located four miles south of McHenry, but he later 
moved to McHenry Township, and lived in the village of McHenry 
for a time. Still later he returned to his farm where he remained until 
1867, at which time he bought the farm now owned by his son, Ellery 
A., which lies on the line between Hartland and Greenwood townships. 
His children were as follows; Lyman, who lives with his son at Lockport, 
111.; Leonard, who after spending his active years on a farm in Minne- 
sota, is now living retired at Elgin, 111.; Mary, who married Arthur 
Stewart, is living in North Dakota; and Ellery A., who is the youngest. 

Ellery A. Harrison lived on his father's homestead, and when his 
father died, he bought out the other heirs and now has one of the model 
farms of his neighborhood. His modern residence was erected by him 
in 1914, and he built his barn in 1907. He has a silo and accommoda- 
tions for a herd of twenty-four cows of the Holstein strain. His home 
is one of the most desirable ones in the county, and is modern in every 
respect, being supplied with hot and cold water, electric lights, a sleeping 
porch and compares favorably with any city residence. The dairy 
barn carries out all of the state requirements, and is a model of its kind. 
Many of his ideas have been adopted by his neighbors after he has 
proved their value. 

Ellery A. Harrison was married December 22, 1886, to Nettie 
Whipple, of Dunham Township, a daughter of Virgil and Jane (Durant) 
Whipple, both of whom are deceased. Her brother, Augustus Whipple 
is on the Whipple homestead. Mrs. Harrison was born in a log house, 
March 30, 1867. She attended the local schools and was engaged in 
teaching school in that same district for two years prior to her marriage. 
Mr. and Mrs. Harrison have no children of their own, but have taken 
two into their hearts and home. These girls, Inez and Blanche Steven- 
son, were sent to the Woodstock High School, from which they were 
graduated. They were then given a normal-school training, and are 
now engaged in teaching school. 

Mr. Harrison is a Republican, and when he cast his first vote there 
were only thirty Republican ballots polled in Hartland Township. 



632 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

During the late war Mis. Harrison took a very active part in war work, 
serving as chairman of several of the committees and did more than her 
share in raising the quotas for the Red Cross, Liberty Loan and other 
drives in her community. 



HOMER MARCELLUS HASTINGS. 

Homer Marcellns Hastings, now deceased, was one of the prominent 
business men of Richmond Township, whose operations as a stock dealer 
made him widely known, lived one-half mile outside the village of Rich- 
mond. He was born at Pittsford, Monroe County, X. Y., October 7, 
1S46, and came to McHenry County in the Spring of 1858. After his 
arrival here he was married to Eliza Belle Martin, born in Richmond 
Township, March 21, 1853, a daughter of Lovain and Fanny (Whiston) 
Martin, natives of Massachusetts and Utica, X. Y., respectively. They 
were married near Hebron, 111., he having come to McHenry County 
with his brother Benjamin, and she with her parents. Benjamin 
Martin located in Richmond Township. Mr. and Mrs. Whiston also 
came to McHenry County, locating in Richmond Township, where he 
died at the age of eighty-three years, and she at the age of eighty-six 
years. Fanny Whiston was only sixteen years old at the time of her 
marriage, and she and her husband continued to reside in Richmond 
Township, dying at their homestead, later the home of Mr. Hastings, 
when both were seventy-one years of age. although twelve years apart, 
as Mrs. Martin was much younger than her husband. Their family 
was as follows: Mis. Hastings; Anna Maria, who died at the age of 
six years; and Lillie, who died in infancy. Mrs. Hastings was seventeen 
years old when her parents located on their present farm, and nineteen 
at the time of her marriage. 

H. M. Hastings spent twenty-four years in Richmond as a stock 
buyer, and then, when Mrs. Martin died, he took charge of the farm 
of 167 acres in Richmond Township, which he made his home, until his 
death, although he continued to buy and ship stock, being the leading 
stock buyer of this region. The dairy interests were promoted on the 
farm and Mr. Hastings also bred Jersey cattle. Mr. Hastings was a 
man of parts, and served on the county equalization board, on the 
village board, and as road commissioner, and was a Republican in his 
political convictions. Both a Mason and member of the Eastern Star, 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY G33 

Mr. Hastings was well known in both orders, and Mrs. Hastings is 
equally interested in the Woman's Relief Corps and the Royal Neighbors. 
They had no children, and he was the sole survivor of his family as 
Mrs. Hastings was of hers. 

Mrs. Hastings is one of the most intelligent ladies of McHenry 
County, and her literary talents find expression in her work as local 
correspondent for metropolitan journals, in which she has been engaged 
for the past quarter of a century. When a girl she learned spinning and 
weaving, she is a musician of no mean ability and has taught both 
instrumental and vocal music, and for years was one of the members of 
the choir of the Richmond Methodist Episcopal church. The old log 
cabin, a relic of pioneer days, on the fair grounds at Woodstock, was 
secured through the instrumentality of Mrs. Hastings, it having been 
the original home of Jonathan Imeson, one of whose descendants is 
Mrs. Albert Gibb of Richmond Township. Mr. Imeson was a near 
neighbor of Mrs. Hastings' parents. No movement has been promul- 
gated for the purpose of bettering conditions or raising the moral standard 
of Richmond Township, that has not had the effective support of Mrs. 
Hastings, and to her co-operation, through her work as correspondent, 
and in other capacities, is due the success of more than one of these 
enterprises. 

Mr. Hastings died suddenly, at 7 A. M. December 27, 1920. The 
funeral was held in the Methodist Episcopal church, Wednesday follow- 
ing, at 1:30 P. M. The Masons had charge of the services at the grave. 
His remains were interred in the Richmond Cemetery. In the passing 
of Mr. Hastings his community suffered a distinct loss. 



JASPER HAVEN. 



Jasper Haven, now deceased, was one of the men who exerted a 
strong influence upon the growth of Seneca Township and Marengo, 
and whose death was a distinct loss to his community. He was born 
in Oswego County, N. Y., October 4, 1816, and died October 14, 1900, 
being buried on October 16, which was the thirtieth anniversary of his 
wedding, which occurred at Waterloo, Iowa, October 16, 1870, when he 
was united with Julia E. Hull, born July 8, 1833, at Churchville, N. Y., 
and died May 14, 1919. She was brought to Seneca Township at an 
early day by her widowed mother and a brother, Gordon Hull, but 
later removal was made to Iowa where Mr. and Mrs. Hull both died. 



634 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

Jasper Haven went from New York to Pennsylvania, and when he 
was twenty-one years of age, with his cart lily possessions tied in a red 
bandana handkerchief, set out for the South to become an overseer on a 
plantation. This was aliout 1831. When he reached Cincinnati, Ohio, 
the steamboat on which he was traveling, blew up, but the ambitious 
young man managed to work his way down the river as far as Cairo, 
purposing to go to New Orleans. There he secured employment in a 
saw-mill, and helped to saw the first rails for the first proposed railroad 
in Illinois, which were to be 20 foot 4x6 white oak timbers, laid end 
to end, and straps of iron nailed on top. He worked eighteen hours 
per day, receiving SI. 50 per day for his work, and when he worked at 
night, he received 82. Later he was made cook for the camp, and 
remained with it until 1841, and then hearing of the land Bales in 
Northern Illinois, he came to Chicago, and from there walked to Union, 
McHenry County. About the same time, his sister, Lorinda, wife of 
T. J. Richards, came to McHenry County, and she and her husband 
secured land about three miles north of Marengo. Another sister, 
Fidelia, wife of Jonathan F. AVolcott, and two brothers, Edmond and 
Edson, settled at Union. Jasper Haven bought in Seneca Township 
for SI. 25 per acre what the present generation knows as the Crandall 
farm, it being three and one-half miles north of Union. Here he devel- 
oped a farm, and enjoyed the companionship of his sisters and brothers, 
and lived with Mrs. Wolcott until his marriage. After his marriage he 
sold his old farm, but bought other land, and at one time owned 600 
acres of land in McHenry County. He had also bought up many tax 
titles in Wisconsin and Iowa, his holdings in all aggregating about 
1 .tiOO acres. He was a very successful farmer, at one time having four 
crops of wheat threshed which he had kept in the stack to save the price 
of a "rainary. Mr. Haven never spared himself, and in order to secure 
a little ready money, which was very scarce in the early days, would 
work at anything offered. From the first he recognized the advisability 
of keeping a good strain of horses, and his product became famous 
throughout a wide region, he specializing on them and grain. He bought 
the David Page farm in Marengo Township for two cousins, Edson and 
Leander, but after one year they decided they could never pay the 
88,000 mortgage, so he took it back. It was to this property that he 
brought his bride in 1870, and they lived there until 1879, when he 
moved to Marengo on account of having been stricken with paralysis 
in one hand, and there lived retired. This farm sold in 1919 for nearly 
S200 per acre. Mr. Haven was a Republican, and served as tax collector 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 635 

in Seneca Township. He cast his first vote for a Democrat, but left that 
party soon afterwards, never to return to it. Not a man to seek office, 
he preferred to do his duty as a citizen in a private capacity. His worth 
and sterling honesty were so generally recognized that he was oftentimes 
called upon to act as guardian for orphans. The Presbyterian church 
had in him a liberal supporter. An advocate of temperance, he aided in 
the organization of the Women's Christian Temperance Union, and 
was active in promoting the prohibition work, but never was willing to 
affiliate himself with the political end of the movement. 

Jasper Haven and his wife had the following children: Helen A., who 
married Rev. H. R. Upton, a Presbyterian minister, of Worthington, 
Minn., taught school for ten terms prior to her marriage, three of them 
being in the home district; and Glenni J., who was named for Senator 
G. W. Scofield of Pennsylvania. 

Glenni J. Haven was born November 9, 1873, and was reared in 
McHenry County. He attended the Cedar Falls Normal School, and 
then schools in McHenry and Boone counties for two years, when he 
entered the law department of the Northern Illinois College, from 
which he was graduated with the degree of LL. B., later taking a post 
graduate course and receiving the degree of LL. M. He was admitted 
to the bar of Missouri and of Tennessee, and was engaged in the practice 
of his profession at Nashville, Tenn. for two years, when his health 
failed, and he returned to Marengo, and until 1919, supervised the oper- 
ation of the home farm. For two years Mr. Haven served as police 
magistrate of Marengo, and since then he has been known as "Judge." 

Like his father he is a stanch Republican, but limits his politics to 
casting his vote for the candidates of his party. For two years he con- 
ducted the Marengo Hotel, and was successful in that, for his talents are 
diversified. A true patriot, when he felt he would be of service to his 
country, he entered the second officers' training camp at Fort Sheridan, 
and was honorably discharged when the signing of the Armistice made 
it unnecessary for him to continue his excellent training, although he 
was ready and anxious to see active service. 

In 1906 Mr. Haven was united in marriage with Louise Medlar of 
Woodstock, who died in less than a year after marriage. On February 
12, 1916, Mr. Haven was married (second) to Mrs. Mae Roberts of Iowa, 
a daughter of John Dean, who was a pioneer of Coral Township, who had 
late]- moved to Iowa. There are no children. Mrs. Haven has a son 
by her first marriage, Sergeant Elba J. Roberts, who was with the 
Railroad Transport Corps in France, and was sent across in June, 1918. 



636 1IISTOKV OP .M.IIKXKV COUNTY 

Sergeant Roberts was a railroad man, and was the only conductor who 
registered from McHonry Count}'. He was in Franco in forty days after 
being called into the service. Mr. Haven is a Mason and is active in his 
fraternity, belonging to Marengo Lodge, A. F. & A. M., Lansing Chapter, 
R. A. M. of Marengo, and Woodstock Commandery, K. T. The Presby- 
terian church holds his membership, and earlier in life he was active in 
Sunday school work. 

In 1919, having sold his farm in Marengo Township, he moved to 
Millsville, Clark County, Wis., where he has a large farm and is engaged 
in raising thorough-bred Holstein cattle. 



LEWIS HATCH. 



Lewis Hatch, who was one of the oldest men of Mellenry County, 
died on his farm at English Prairie, when he was within two months of 
being ninety-three years of age. His wife, who bore the maiden name of 
Mandana Hatch, survived him and lived to be eighty-eight. Mr. Hatch 
was one of the heaviest landowners in the county, his holdings in 
McHenry aggregating over 1,000 acres, and he also owned 6,000 acres in 
Minnesota and land in Nebraska and Kansas, and about 6.000 acres in 
the State of Washington, his estate amounting to something like 8300,000. 
Prior to his death Mr. Hatch arranged his affairs and divided his property 
between his three sons, Miles, Fred and Frank. His children, five in 
number, were as follows: Fayette, who died in infancy; Miles, who died 
March 6, 1919, had lived in the state of Washington where he was a 
lumberman, dairyman, feeder of Guernsey cattle and a hop grower, is 
survived by a son, Lewis, who lives at Alderson, Wash.; Fred L., who is 
mentioned below; Frank W., who lives in Lake County, 111.; and Mrs. 
Augustus Hubbard. Mr. Hubbard, a former mayor of Elgin, 111., is now 
deceased. After going to Washington, Lewis Hatch never returned to 
McHenry County, but he looked after his property in Washington. 

Fred L. Hatch was born on his father's homestead one mile east of 
Spring Grove, November 1, 1S48, and after attending the local schools, 
he was a student at the Elgin Academy, and then for some time was 
engaged in teaching, beginning this career at the age of nineteen years, 
and continuing for three winters in Kane and McHenry Counties, and 
for a time taught at Champaign, 111. Still later he returned to the old 
farm, living there for awhile, but for the last ten years -has resided in 



HISTORY OK McIIENRY COUNTY 637 

Lake County, one mile distant from his farm of 333 acres, three-quarters 
of which comprises his father's homestead. In addition he owns about 
2,000 acres in Minnesota, Michigan and Washington. For ten years 
Mr. Hatch served Burton Township as supervisor, and during that time 
the county farm was bought and the buildings erected. In 1912 Mr. 
Hatch was '.he candidate of the Progressive party for the State Assembly. 
In 1890 Mr. Hatch was married to Anna M. Reynolds of Belvidere, 
111., who died twenty years later, leaving no children. Mr. Hatch was 
married (second) in 1905 to Mrs. Ethelyn (Baker) Foster, of Manistee, 
Mich., a daughter of Prof. Samuel Baker, late superintendent of schools 
of Manistee, now deceased. Prior to her marriage, Mrs. Hatch was a 
high-school teacher, and is an organizer in the work of women in her 
neighborhood. Mr. and Mrs. Hatch had two children, but both died in 
infancy. Mr. Hatch is a convert to alfalfa growing, having experi- 
mented with it on his old home, under instructions from the Farmers' 
Institute. He has always been an advocate of the "Good Roads" 
movement, and is one of the very progressive men of his neighborhood. 



JOHN HAWLEY. 



John Hawley, a director in the Huntley State Bank, is interested in 
farming in McHenry County, conducting at present two farms, compris- 
ing 270 acres of land, in Grafton Township. Mr. Hawley was born in 
Germany, August 29, 1862, but was brought to the United States in 
1863 by his parents, who located at Crystal Lake, 111. Later they went 
to Kansas. 

John Hawley attended the common schools of McHenry County, 
and after attaining to his majority went into a mercantile business at 
Crystal Lake, from whence he moved to Huntley, continuing in the 
same line until he retired from it in 1900 to devote himself to his agri- 
cultural interests. When the Huntley State Bank was organized, Mr. 
Hawley became one of its directors, and he has held this office ever 
since. A Republican, Mr. Hawley has been alderman of Huntley for 
three terms, and has also served as town clerk. 

In 1878 Mr. Hawley was married to Miss Mina Weltzine, and they 
have the following children: Edith, who is the wife of J. W. Burns, a 
leading merchant of Huntley; Neva, who is the wife of M. J. Van Ness, 
bookkeeper for Jelke & Company; and Lillian E., who is at home. The 



638 HISTORY OF McIIFXKY COFNTY 

family belong to the Congregational church. He belongs to the Odd 
Fellows and Woodmen of the World. A man of high principles, he has 

conducted his affairs in accordance with them, and has won and retains 
the confidence and respect of his fellow citizens. 



CHARLES HAWTHORNE. 

Charles Hawthorne, township assessor of Hebron Township, and one 
of the well known men of Hebron, is a native of the township in which 
he lives, and he was born on his father's farm, three miles southeast of 
Hebron, March 6, 1866, a son of Isaac and Lorinda (Thomas) Haw- 
thorne. Isaac Hawthorne was born in Oneida County, N. Y., and was 
married in Illinois, and then located on the farm his parents, Edward and 
Rachel Hawthorne, had secured from the government during his boy- 
hood. Rachel Hawthorne died on this farm. One of the sons, Isaiah, 
secured a portion of the farm and lived on it until his death, Edward 
Hawthorne living with him until he died. 

Charles Hawthorne lived on the homestead until he was twenty-two 
years old, and then, in 1901, bought 160 acres adjoining it, upon which he 
lived until about 1914, since which time he has resided at Hebron. Mr. 
Hawthorne is now engaged in handling power milking machines. A 
Republican, he has been assessor of Hebron Township for four years, 
and is very satisfactory in this office. His duties as assessor have made 
him known throughout the township, but prior to that he had impressed 
people as to his reliability and uprightness by his life among them. 



ISAAC HAWTHORNE. 



Isaac Hawthorne, now deceased, was formerly one of the successful 
farmers of Hebron Township and a man universally respected. He was 
born May 30, 1827, and died August 30, 1899. On March 27, 18G2, he 
was married to Lorinda Thomas, born October 7, 1839, and died Sep- 
tember 9, 1911. He was a son of Edward and Rachel Hawthorne of 
Oneida County, N. Y., who, about 1846, came west to Racine, Wis., 
and for one or two years resided there, and then moved to the present 
Hawthorne farm, on which both parents died, Edward Hawthorne in 








X 




HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 639 

1861 and his wife about sixteen years later, at the age of eighty-three 
years. Isaac and Isaiah Hawthorne were their only sons to reach 
maturity, the latter dying when thirty-eight years of age. There were 
three sisters and an elder half-sister in the family, namely: Elizabeth, 
who married a Mr. Foster, survived her husband many years and lived 
at Racine, Wis.; Sarah, who married Adam Herzog, lived at Racine, and 
died when seventy-two; Mary, who married a Mr. Westcott, moved to 
Iowa and died there when about seventy; and Martha, who married 
Alonzo Thomas, died in young womanhood. Lorinda (Thomas) 
Hawthorne was born in Richmond Township, a daughter of Alfred and 
Susan (Westcott) Thomas of New York, who, about 1835, came to 
McHenry County, where they were pioneers. Later in life they lived 
at Woodstock, where he died about 1874, aged sixty-nine years, but she 
died in Mason City, Iowa, aged seventy-six years. 

Isaac Hawthorne and his wife began farming on the homestead that 
he later acquired, and in time became the owners of 590 acres of land, 
all but forty acres in one body, but composing four farms with four sets 
of buildings, he being one of the largest landowners and milk producers 
in his township, and devoted himself to his farm. In 1900 his widow 
came to Hebron, where she continued to live until her death. Their 
children were as follows: Sarah Etta, who is the widow of Stephen H. 
Holden, to whom she was married May 28, 1902, lost him by death on 
April 9, 1919, he having been a farmer until 1904, and after that lived 
retired although he had been a butter and cheese maker for some time, 
has no children, and lives at Hebron; Charles, a sketch of whom appears 
elsewhere; Ida, who died in August, 1907, aged thirty-eight years, was 
the wife of A. P. Robertson, now of Hebron; Edward, who is a rural free 
delivery carrier at Hebron; Frank, who lives on the original farm of his 
grandparents; Alfred, who is a stock buyer of Hebron; and Earl, who is on 
his father's last-bought farm in Hebron Township. 



WILLIAM HELM. 



William Helm, now living retired at Hebron, formerly one of the 
successful agriculturalists of McHenry County, was born in Germany, 
March 24, 1863, a son of John and Caroline (Peters) Helm, both of 
whom were natives of Germany. In 1882 they came to the United 
States, locating at Harvard, 111., where a sister of Mrs. Helm, Mrs. 



640 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

John Hockstadt, had already settled. Land was secured near Hebron, 
and William Helm began working by the month, receiving $180 the firs! 
year, $200 the second, and then $18 to $20 per month, for two years 
of this time being with Beal Finch. Frugal as well as industrious, 
William Helm saved his money and before long was able to rent land, 
from Mrs. Merrick, on which he remained for three years, paying cash, 
and keeping the proceeds of his work. In this way he secured a nice 
start in handling milk, which he sold to local butter and cheese factories. 
Mr. Helm, at the expiration of the three years, operated the 160 acre 
farm of Melvin Cole, father of A. J. Cole, on shares, and from a herd 
of fifty cows shipped over 1,200 pounds of milk daily, and sometimes 
exceeded that amount. After remaining on that farm for seven years, 
he bought the adjoining farm of eighty acres from Charles Prouty. 
paying $80 per acre for it. Later he added forty acres, and remain sd 
there for ten years, erecting new buildings, put in wells, and other 
improvements, and then sold it for $150 per acre. It is one of the 
fine dairy properties of the county. Retiring from farm work, Mr. 
Helm located at Hebron, and for twelve years worked at the carpenter 
trade, which he had picked up. He has one of the nicest homes in the 
village. While a Republican, he has never sought office. Reared in 
the Lutheran church, he gives it his support, and although he is not a 
member of it, his family are. 

In 1888, when twenty-five years of age, Mr. Helm was married to 
Anna Puttbreese, born near Stralsund, and came to the United States 
when sixteen j'ears old. Her brother, Charles Puttbreese is a retired 
farmer of Woodstock. Mr. and Mrs. Helm have the following children: 
Anna who married William Goodsmith of Milwaukee, Wis., a locomotive 
engineer; Minnie, who married Clarence Stewart, a barber of Hebron; 
William, who is foreman of the Borden Dairy Company at McHenry, 
has held that position for two years; and Emma, who married Ben 
Wilbrandt, a sheep man of Crystal Lake, 111. Mr. Helm is an example 
for what America has done for thousands of young men coming here 
from Germany. He has been broad enough to recognize his advantages, 
and neglected no opportunity to demonstrate his loyalty to his adopted 
country during the World War. 



GEORGE A. HEMMER 

George A. Hemmer, one of the substantial farmers of Grafton Town- 
ship, is located one mile west of Huntley, and was born in Coral Town- 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 641 

ship, October 14, 1856, a son of George and Kundigunda (Ziegler) 
Henimer, both of whom were born near Bamburg, Bavaria, Germany, 
and there married. The father gave the compulsory military service to 
his country, and then engaged in farming, but left Germany for the 
United States in 1842, and landed in New York City without any money. 
He went to Woodbridge, N. J., where he secured employment in its 
porcelain and clay works, and later came to Illinois. He obtained a 
farm of 175 acres in Kane County, on the line between it and McHenry 
County, and there he and his wife lived until 1S76, when they traded a 
part of their farm for one across the county line, on which he died in 
1887, aged seventy years, and she in 1892, when over eighty. They had 
lived in that community for over fifty years, and owned 240 acres of 
land, which they had turned over to their sons. Their five children were 
as follows: Margaret, who married Otto Nichols, lived in the same 
neighborhood as her parents until 1884, when she moved to Stearns 
County, Minn., and there died; Barbara, who married John Kreuter, 
lived in Grafton Township, near Huntley, for twenty-five years, finally 
retiring to Huntley, and later to Elgin, 111., where they are now living; 
John, who died in 1874, at the age of twenty-two years, was drowned 
while skating; George, whose name heads this review; and Joseph, who 
was a partner with George in the ownership of the homestead until 1900, 
when he died. He never married, and died of typhoid-pneumonia 
contracted in the early part of December, 1899, while engaged in ship- 
ping some stock from West Union, Iowa. Although very ill, he managed 
to reach home before his death, which occurred January 10, 1900. 

Following his brother's demise, George Hemmer closed up the outside 
business, but continued the stock shipments for fifteen years, operating 
upon quite an extensive scale. He still owns the old farm, but for the 
past five years has lived on the 107 acres he bought near Huntley some 
years ago. On this farm he has a large house and suitable outbuildings. 
In a "fire about thirteen years ago, all of the buildings except the house 
were burned, and so the barns and other buildings are comparatively 
new. One of the barns is 34 x 80 and the other is 54 x 84 feet. There 
is a silo and other improvements, and Mr. Hemmer still buys and ships 
cattle. He has not taken much part in politics, but his brother, Joseph, 
was very active, having been a Democrat until the second administration 
of President Cleveland, when he turned independent. His numerous 
satirical articles on the "full dinner pail" attracted considerable atten- 
tion. Like his father, also a Democrat, Joseph Hemmer was a very 



642 HISTORY OF McIIENRY COUNTY 

well-read man. A personal admiration for .lames (1. Blaine led him to 
vote for the Republican candidate for the presidency in 1884. 

George Hemmer was married when he was thirty-six years old to 
Mary Mavis of Coral Township, a daughter of David and Elizabeth 
Davis, natives of Wales, both of whom are now deceased. Their children 
are as follows: Pear'. K., who was graduated from the Huntley High 
School, was engaged as a teacher in the public schools of Kane and 
McHenry counties in music and drawing, is a very close student, and 
owns one of the best private libraries in the county; Edmond Gerald, 
who is attending high school; Elizabeth, who died in childhood; and 
Joseph, who is the youngest . 



ANDREW H. HENDERSON. 

Andrew H. Henderson, ex-sheriff of McHenry County, who is now 
living retired at Crystal Lake, is one of the very prominent men of 
McHenry County, and a man who is deserving of all the confidence he 
inspires. He was born in McHenry County, February 22, 1858, one of 
the nine children born to his parents, Andrew H. and Anna (Young) 
Henderson, natives of Scotland, who in 1844, came to the United States, 
first stopping in Rhode Island, but in 1848, they came west to Illinois, 
and located in McHenry County, where they secured a farm, and con- 
ducted it thereafter. He died in 1S93, and she in 1894. 

Andrew H. Henderson attended district school No. 8, in McHenry 
County, and learned to be a practical farmer under his father's instruc- 
tion. In 1890, he left the farm to enter a mercantile life at McHenry, 
and in 1893 opened a butter and dairy business, which he sold in 1895, 
and moved to Crystal Lake to become city marshal, holding that 
office until he was elected sheriff of McHenry County on the Republican 
ticket, and when his term of office expired, in 1914, he returned to 
Crystal Lake and was again city marshal for two years, and then in 
1916, he retired. During the time he was sheriff, he proved himself a 
fearless official, and gave entire satisfaction to the law-abiding people 
of the county. In the fall of 1918, he was a candidate for nomination 
for sheriff. 

In 1882 Mr. Henderson was married to Miss Lettie Haufiman, a 
daughter of David S. Hauffman, and a member of one of the leading 
families of McHenry County. Mr. and Mrs. Henderson had two daugh- 



HISTORY OF McHENBY COUNTY 643 

t crs, namely: Florence, who is married to Ray Neville of Forest Park, 
111., and cashier of the Bowman Dairy Company; and Alice A., who is 
married to Charles Irwin of Chicago, assistant superintendent of the 
public service of that city. Mrs. Henderson died December 26, 1896. 
The family all belong to the Presbyterian church of Crystal Lake. Mr. 
Henderson belongs to the Odd Fellows and Modern Woodmen of Amer- 
ica. A man of unusual ability and long experience as a guardian of public 
safety, he is eminently qualified for any office of this character he may 
be 'called upon to fill, while his sterling integrity and unquestioned 
bravery make him a terror to evil doers. 



CALVIN J. HENDRICKS. 

Calvin J. Hendricks, formerly an attorney-at-law and mayor of 
Harvard, was one of the leading lawyers and citizens of McHenry 
County. He was born at Spring Grove, 111., October 27, 1872, and 
died September 27, 1918. His parents were John and Johannah (Larkin) 
Hendricks, natives of Germany and Ireland, respectively. Calvin J. 
Hendricks attended the district schools and the Woodstock high school, 
and during the summer months worked at farm labor, and when only 
seventeen years old, in 1890, he secured a teacher's certificate. In 1891, 
he entered the Indiana Normal School and later a business college at 
Valparaiso, Ind., and after completing his studies there, began teaching 
at Grass Lake, Lake County, 111. After teaching there during the 
spring and fall terms of 1892, and the winter term of 1892-3, Mr. Hen- 
dricks entered the law office of David T. Smiley at Woodstock, and was 
admitted to the bar of Illinois, May 21, 1895. 

From then on until April 1, 1899, Mr. Hendricks remained with 
Mr. Smiley, in the meanwhile, during the spring of 1897, being elected 
city treasurer of Woodstock, which office he held one year, and then 
resigned on account of moving to Harvard, where he opened an office 
April 10, 1899, and built up a large and valuable practice. He was a 
Republican, and in 1903 was elected city attorney of Harvard, and in 
April, 1915, he was elected mayor of this city, and re-elected in 1917, 
with no opposition. In July, 1904, he was appointed master-in-chancery, 
and served as such until 1916, and from 1903, until his death, he was 
attorney for the Harvard Mutual Building & Loan Association. His 



044 ' HISTORY OF McHENBY COUNTY 

fraternal affiliations were with the Masons, Knights of Pythiai and 
Modern W linen of America. 

On November 3, 1897, Mr. Hendricks was married to Miss Pauline 
Marie Udell, a daughter of Asad and Kate (Donnelly) Udell, who died 
September (>, 1902. <>n August 9, 1905, Mr. Hendricks was married 
(second) to Edna Francisco, a daughter of John A. Francisco of Warren, 
III. Mr. and Mrs. Hendricks had the following children: Kathryn E., 
Marion F. and Harriet L. Mr. Hendricks was a communicant of the 
Episcopal church, as is his widow. The office Mr. Hendricks occupied 
for some years was located over the Harvard State bank. On January 1, 
101-1. he formed a partnership with Mr. Marshall, under the style of 
Hendricks & Marshall, which association continued until his demise. 
A scholarly man, and yet one who had a thoroughly practical grasp on 
affairs, Mr. Hendricks was easily one of the leaders in his county, where 
he was held in the highest esteem. 

He was the nominee on the Republican ticket for County Judge, 
September 11, 1918, and died a little over two weeks later. 



HERMAN HENK. 



Herman Henk, one of the retired farmers of Algonquin, is one of 
the men who have made good, and he is a credit to himself and his 
community. He was born on the old farm of his father, October 14, 1872. 
He is a son of Henry Henk, now deceased, who was born June 26, 1836, 
and died November 15, 1904. At nineteen years of age, he came to the 
United States in company with some other young men, and they drove 
to McHenry Count}' from Chicago. 

Henry Henk worked for a time at Dundee in a foundry making flat 
irons, and also at Carpenterville. It was during that period that he was 
married to Caroline Haas of Germany, and after his marriage he bought 
forty acres of land one mile east of Algonquin, going into debt for it 
and for a yoke of oxen. The land was in the timber, and on it was a 
log house in which he and his wife lived for a time. In order to get a 
little money, he hired out by the day, receiving twenty-five cents and 
his board, and at odd moments cleared off one-half of his farm. He then 
sold it and bought 135 acres in the same vicinity, The land had been 
cut over, but the stumps remained, and hard work it was to get them 
out. On this second farm was a small house. Mr. Henk traded his 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 645 

yoke of oxen for a span of horses, paying some cash for it as well. This 
farm he made his permanent home and it is still owned by his youngest 
son, August. He bought two other farms, one of 180 acres, known as 
the old John Gillihan farm, and the other of 185 acres was the old Grimes 
farm, and he owned them at his death, having operated all three of them 
for some years, being one of the most extensive farmers of his day and 
neighborhood. Mr. Henk placed his homestead under cultivation, 
remodeled the house, and erected a barn with full basement in 1872, 
which is still in use, although enlarged. He did other clearing on his 
properties, and kept on improving them as long as he lived. In addition 
to the many stumps, there was much undergrowth of a heavy character 
and all had to be removed before crops could be profitably cultivated. 
Mr. Henk belonged to the real farming class, centering his interest on 
his land and caring nothing for politics. The German Lutheran church 
received all the attention he could spare from his farm and family, and 
he helped to organize the church of that denomination at Dundee, and 
also the one at Algonquin, becoming one of the leading members of the 
latter. His wife died when Herman Henk was fourteen years old. They 
had nine children, six of whom reached maturity, namely: Henry, who 
is a resident of Algonquin; Caroline, who is Mrs. Ferd Marshall of 
Chicago; Louise, who was Mrs. Fred Borchardt of Chicago, is deceased, 
passing away at the age of thirty-seven; Herman, whose name heads 
this review; Annie, who is Mrs. Samuel Beckman of Chicago; and 
August, who lived on the old homestead, retired and moved to Algonquin. 

Herman Henk remained at home until he was nineteen years of age, 
at which time he began working for farmers by the month. On February 
10, 1S98, he was married to Caroline Zimmerman, born at Ridgefield, 
April 8, 1875, a daughter of Charles and Caroline Zimmerman, natives 
of Germany. Mrs. Zimmerman came to the United States when she 
was eighteen years. Mr. Zimmerman was a farmer, and was killed at a 
railroad crossing when his daughter, Caroline, was seven years old. 
After his marriage, Mr. Henk rented for some years one of his father's 
farms on shares. Later he bought that farm of 180 acres, placed about 
forty acres more of it under cultivation, remodeled the buildings, built 
a new barn, 36x100 feet, and two silos 16x35 feet, and kept on improving 
his property each year, until it is one of the best farms in the township. 
Until March, 1908, he operated his farm, but then retired, and since then 
has rented his farm. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henk have three sons, namely: Herman, who took a 
commercial course in the Metropolitan Business College of Chicago; 



646 HISTORY OF McHENBY COUNTY 

Paul, who is in the employ of the Northwestern Railroad at Algonquin; 
and William. Mr. Henk at tends the Congregational church. He belongs 
to the Odd Fellows and his wife to the Rebekahs of Crystal Lake. During 
the years he was on the farm Mr. Henk proved that he knew how to 
work and save, and by improvements increase the value of his property. 
While he has never entered politics, he takes an intelligent interest in 
civic matters, and believes in improvements to keep up a village or 
county, just as he does those on a farm. 



FRED J. HERDKLOTZ. 

Fred J. Herdklotz, one of the enterprising farmers of Greenwood 
Township, owns and operates 120 acres of land, and he was born in a 
log cabin on this farm, September 19, 1866, a son of Henry and Mag- 
dalena (Deidtrich) Herdklotz. Henry Herdklotz was born in Alsace 
Loraine, France, in 1840, and was brought to the United States when 
he was five years old. His wife was also born in Alsace. Their children 
were as follows: Laura, who is the wife of B. C. Kingsley; Henry, who 
is deceased; and Fred J. When the Herdklotz family came to the 
United States in 1845, immediate settlement was made in Greenwood 
Township, McHenry County, and here Henry Herdklotz was reared 
and became a successful farmer. The log cabin in which Fred J. Herd- 
klotz was born, was built by the grandfather as the first family residence 
in the new home, and it is still standing, being considerable of a novelty 
today. 

Fred J. Herdklotz was reared in his present township, and from boy- 
hood was taught farming in all of its details. He attended the local 
schools, and helped his father until he reached manhood. 

In 1891 he was married to Emma Haefner, a daughter of Christ 
and Mary Haefner, who was born in Wisconsin. Her father was a 
stockman, and he died in 1916. Mr. and Mrs. Herdklotz have two 
children, Milford and Stella. He carries on general farming, and has 
time to give some attention to public matters, having been a road com- 
missioner for three years, and a school director for many years. His 
affiliations are with the Republican party. The Methodist Episcopal 
church holds his membership. A skilled farmer and good business man, 
Mr. Herdklotz carries into public life the same characteristics which 




3<^<^/U2^^i^v£- &<X>Ylsv™<sL : U 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 647 

brought him success in his private ventures, and his community has 
benefited by his experience and ability. 



ROY L. HERRICK. 



Roy L. Herrick, president of the Herrick Feed Company, and one 
of the enterprising men of Harvard, has built up a business of consider- 
able magnitude through his own efforts. He was born in Wisconsin, 
March 1, 1877, one of the three children of Hiram H. and Jennie (Dodge) 
Herrick. Hiram H. Herrick was a prosperous farmer of Sauk County, 
Miss. He died in 1883. During the Civil War, he supported the Union 
cause as a soldier, and received his honorable discharge after his period 
of service had expired. His wife survives him. 

Roy L. Herrick attended the district schools of his native place, 
and entered railroad employ when he become self-supporting, becoming 
train dispatcher of the Chicago and Northwestern Railroad, and con- 
tinuing with that road for twenty-three years. On January 1, 1918, 
he branched out, organizing The Herrick Feed Company of which he is 
President, and M. H. Herrick, his wife, is secretary and treasurer. 

On March 26, 1901, Mr. Herrick was united in marriage with Miss 
Mabel H. Carpenter, and they have the following children: Roy V., 
who was born August 15, 1902; Jeannette, who was born February 3, 
1906; and Robert L., who was born March 15, 1907. He and Mrs. 
Herrick are consistent members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
In all his business transactions, Mr. Herrick has displayed an integrity 
and a willingness to render efficient service, and he enjoys the respect 
of all with whom he has been associated. 



CHARLES C. HIGBEE. 



Charles C. Higbee, former mayor of Marengo, is at present engaged 
in the oil business as a member of the Pennsylvania Oil Company. Mr. 
Higbee was born in Michigan, June 3, 1870. On October 9, 1893, he 
was married to Zua W. Blodgett. They have one child, Garnette A. 
In 1900 Mr. Higbee came to Marengo Township, and bought a farm, 



648 HISTORY OF McIIFXRY (OFXTY 

mi which he and his family resided until they moved to the city of Mar- 
engo in 1908. 

In 1915 Mr. Higbee was elected mayor of Marengo, and so popular 
did his administration prove that he was re-elected in 1917. Mr. and 
Mrs. Higbee belong to the Methodist Episcopal church. Fraternally 
Mr. Higbee is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, Knights 
of Pythias and Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 



REV. BENNO A. HILDEBRAXD. 

Rev. Benno A. Hildebrand, pastor of St. Peter's Roman Catholic 
church of Spring Grove, is one of the scholarly men of his faith, and a 
potent factor in the moral life of his community. He was born in 
Switzerland, Xovember 16, 1884, and he is one of five children born 
to his parents, John and Sophie (Wetzel) Hildebrand. John Hildebrand 
was a veterinary surgeon, and practiced his profession until his death, 
which occurred in 1901. His wife survives him. 

Benno A. Hildebrand attended the public schools of his native land, 
completing his studies at St. Francis Seminary, Milwaukee, Wis. Imme- 
diately thereafter he was ordained priest, June 27, 1909, by the Very 
Rev. Bishop Muldoon of Rockford, 111., and was stationed at Aurora, 
111., as assistant priest. From there he was sent to Savannah, 111., where 
he remained for a year, and then for three years he was sent as a mission- 
ary to Cuba. Upon his return to this country, he served for three years 
as assistant priest at Aurora, and then, in September, 1917, he came to 
St. Mary's church at Huntley, and in May, 1919, to Spring Grove. His 
parish contains sixty-five families, and under his beneficent care, the 
affairs of the church are in excellent condition. 



CHAUNCEY W. HILL. 



Chauncey W. Hill, one of the pioneer horseshoers and blacksmiths 
of McHenry County, conducts one of the best equipped general repair 
workshops at AYoodstock, and is a solid and reliable man of this part 
of the county. He was born in McHenry County, in September, 1S5S, 
one of the six children born to Xewell and Wealthy (Hawley) Hill. 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 649 

Newell Hill was born in New York state, where he learned the horse- 
shoeing trade, and followed it in his native state until 1848, when he 
came to Illinois, but he died in New York, where he had moved from 
Illinois. The mother died in 1885. 

Chauncey W. Hill attended the common schools of New York, and 
learned blacksmithing under his father, who was an expert in his line. 
He has always continued in this branch of industrial activity, and is 
unquestionably a leader in it. He is a Republican, and served the city 
of Woodstock as an alderman for eight years, and was a justice of the 
peace for ten years. 

On December 22, 1S80, Mr. Hill was united in marriage with Miss 
Carrie Ott, a daughter of Martin Ott, and they have two children, 
namely: Leon O., who married Pear McGowen, has two children, Robert 
and Douglas; and Merle D., who married Nellie Fosdick, has a son, 
William. Mrs. Hill is a Christian Scientist. In addition to the very elegant 
family residence at No. 125 Van Buren street, Woodstock, Mr. Hill owns 
other city property, and is a man of ample means. His fraternal connec- 
tions are with the Elks and Woodmen of the World. The services he 
has rendered to his community in both a business and official way, 
cannot be lightly considered, and he is justly numbered among the 
worth-while men of the county seat. 



PHILIP G. HOFFMAN. 



Philip G. Hoffman, of Spring Grove, supervisor of Burton Township, 
is one of the very representative men of McHenry County, and one who 
stands high in public confidence. He was born in McHenry Township, 
May 2, 1865, a son of Aaron Hoffman, and grandson of Martin L. 
Hoffman. Martin L. Hoffman was born at Philadelphia, Pa., in 1790, 
and reared in Somerset County, Pa., from the time he was ten years 
old. In 1830 he came west to Berrien County, Mich., and to McHenry 
County, June 6, 1836, settling then in Burton Township, of which he 
was the pioneer. During the gold excitement of 1849, he went over- 
land to California, and died at New Orleans, La., on the way back, in 
1852, aged sixty-seven years. His wife, Hannah Cupp, was born in 
Somerset County, Pa., in 1808, and she survived him until 1867. Their 
old house at Spring Grove is now owned by Philip G. Hoffman. 

Aaron Hoffman was born in Somerset County, Pa., October 1, 1824, 



650 EISTORY OP McHENRY COUNTY 

and lir went In California with his father, and prospected there for 
three years, meeting with fair success. On his return to McHenry 
County he bought land in McIIenry Township, where five of his eight 
children were horn. His wife was Isabella Cole, also a native of Somerset 
County, Pa. In 1862, Aaron Hoffman bought another farm ami in 1S6S 
moved on it and here he died in 1893, his widow surviving him until 
1902. Aaron Hoffman owned 495 acres of land in Burton Township, 
which is now divided into three farms. His children were as follows: 
Senorita, who was born in 1855, married William R. James and died in 
1910; Douglas, who was born in 1857, died in 1870; Mark, who was 
born in 1859, died in 1916 on the old home at Spring Grove; Philip G., 
whose name heads this review; William, who was born April 16, 1872, is 
a railroad man of Green Bay, Wis.; and three who died young. 

Philip G. Hoffman followed in the footsteps of his father and grand- 
lather, and went to the Klondike in search of gold, but unlike them 
returned rich only in experience. At his father's death he secured a 
portion of the homestead, and as long as his brother Mark was alive, 
was in partnership with him. He now owns 289 acres of the homestead 
and his grandfather's farm, and carries on dairying and grain farming, 
keeping two tenants. For some time he has been taking things easy, 
only going into the fields at harvest time and when there is a rush of 
work. Mr. Hoffman is a Democrat, and after serving as assessor, in 
1917, was elected supervisor, which office he still holds, and is discharging 
the duties of that office very efficiently. Fraternally he is a Mason and 
Woodman. 

Mr. Hoffman has never married, but has practically reared his 
nephew, Paul Hoffman, who entered the service for the World W r ar, 
June 26, 1918, was sent to the front in October, 1918, was gassed on the 
Argonne front and died at Stignay, France, May 6, 1919, aged twenty- 
four years, leaving a widow who is now residing at Wauconda, 111. 



JOSEPH C. HOLLY. 



Joseph C. Holly, cashier of the Hoy Banking Company at McHenry, 
and a former postmaster of the city, is deservedly placed among the 
representatives and very prominent men of McHenry County. He was 
born in McHenry County, July 25, 1885, one of the six children born to 
his parents, Roswcll and Nizza (Hebard) Holly. Roswell Holly was 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 651 

born in Pennsylvania, but came to McHenry County in 1855. He was 
a carpenter by trade, and worked at his trade in Woodstock, where he 
lived until 1SS4, when he moved to McHenry, and there died in 1905. 
His wife survives and lives with her son, Joseph C. Holly. 

After attending the grammar and high schools of his native county, 
Joseph C. Holly learned the trade of a mould maker and was employed 
as such by the Terra Cotta Company of McHenry County, with which 
he remained until 1911, when he was appointed postmaster of McHenry. 
At the close of his term of office, he went with the Hoy Banking Company 
as bookkeeper, and was made its cashier, September 16, 1916. Since 
1914, he has been township treasurer, and in 1917 was elected village 
treasurer. He is a strong Republican in politics. 

On September 16, 1908, Mr. Holly was married to Miss Ethel May 
Strong, and they have two sons, Warren S. and Harold J. Mr. and 
Mrs. Holly are Universalists. He belongs to the Masons, Eastern Star 
and Modern Woodmen of America. A man of sterling character, he 
has capably discharged the duties assigned to him, and proved himself 
worthy of every trust reposed in him, and of future advancement, if he 
desires to accept other offices. 



RILEY HOLMES. 



Riley Holmes, now deceased, was formerly one of the well known 
men of McHenry County in several lines of endeavor, and during his 
declining years lived in retirement at Hebron. He was born at Akron, 
Ohio, February 10, 1846, a son of Thomas and Maria (Roddell) Holmes, 
both of whom were born in England, but were married after coming to 
the United States. They located in Lake County, III., about 1849, going 
thence to Racine County, Wis., and in 1871 came to McHenry County 
and divided their time between Hebron and Richmond townships, he 
dying in the latter, when sixty-three years old. She passed away in 
Hebron Township when seventy years old. Their farm was in Rich- 
mond Township. Of their nine children who reached maturity, four 
were living in 1919, namely: Riley, whose name heads this review; 
Russell, who lived at Genoa Junction, Wis., was killed in an accident 
January 5, 1920; Frank, who lives at Hebron; and Ida, who is Mrs. 
John Reynolds of Hebron. 



652 HISTORY OF M.HKXRY OOIXTY 

After attaining to a working ago, Riley Holmes became a cheese 
maker and was in the employ of (1. W. Conn at Hebron for ten years, 
and continued in this line for thirteen years and becoming very expert 
turning out 600 pounds of cheese daily, and was paid a salary. His prod- 
uct was exhibited at county fairs, and he would make it at these 
exhibitions as he was recognized as one of the expert cheese makers 
in the state. For the past twenty-six years Mr. Holmes lived at Hebron 
and was a director of the Hebron Bank. While he was a Republican, 
he took no active part in politics. Of late years he spent his winters 
at St. Petersburg, Fla., where he died December 5, 1920, aged seventy- 
four years, nine months and twenty-five days. 

On September IS, 1895, Mr. Holmes was married to Dora Holmes, 
widow of his brother Adelbert, and daughter of Mclvin J. Cole, and a 
sister of A. J. Cole, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work. 
Mrs. Holmes was married first when twenty-three years of age. 

Riley Holmes and his brother Frank Holmes were together all their 
lives. When the mother died twenty-four years ago, the two brothers 
began living together at Hebron. Mrs. Holmes owned a farm inherited 
from her father which was sold in 1919 and Riley and Frank Holmes 
owned their father's homestead in Richmond Township. Riley Holmes 
was the owner of several track horses, some of which were exhibited, 
and won premiums at the Woodstock and Elkhorn fairs. He was a 
member of the Horsemen's Association of Richmond, and all his life 
enjoyed driving a good horse. His horse "Modesty" won many honors 
and is still well remembered by horse lovers in the county. He was held 
in the highest regard by all who knew him, and he had many friends who 
were won and retained through his genial manner and kindly actions. 
His demise was deplored by all who knew him although he w-as spared 
for many useful years during all of which he was a constructive force 
in his community. 



JAMES S. HOWARD. 



James S. Howard, one of the oldest native sons of Greenwood Town- 
ship, and a prominent farmer of this county, was born on the farm he 
still occupies, October 14, 1844. He is a son of Matthew and Catherine 
(Short) Howard, natives of County Clare and County Tyrone, Ireland, 
respectively. In 1835, Matthew Howard left Ireland and landed at 
Quebec, Canada, where he spent three years, and then, in 1838, came to 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 653 

McHenry County, 111., and took up, a claim in Greenwood Township. 
In 1840, he bought 280 acres, and later forty acres more, from the 
government. Subsequently he bought other land from private indi- 
viduals until he owned 640 acres. He and his wife had the following 
children: Johanna, who is the widow of P. J. Nolan, resides in Hart- 
land Township; James S., Margaret, who died in infancy, and Thomas 
P., who died at the age of sixty-seven years. The mother of these 
children died when she was thirty-four years old, and at that time 
James S. was only five years of age, and he was taken by an aunt, Mary 
Howard, who reared him, and he lived with her until she was married. 
His father married (second) Mary Griffin, and they had two children, 
John J. and Edward L. Matthew Howard died April 11, 1888. 

James S. Howard has spent all of his life on the homestead, and 
here he carries on general farming. This farm contains 320 acres of 
land, and is located on sections 17 and 28. In politics Mr. Howard is a 
Democrat. He belongs to the Catholic church. Belonging as he does 
to one of the old pioneer families of McHenry County, and having 
lived here all his life, he naturally is very much interested in whatever 
promises to prove of permanent benefit to his community and its people. 



CLARENCE F. HOY. 



Clarence F. Hoy, general manager of the Ringwood State Bank of 
Ringwood, is one of the substantial and well-known men of this county. 
He was born in McHenry County, and belongs to one of the oldest and 
most prominent families of this part of the state. He is a son of Fre- 
mont and Hattie (Osborn) Hoy, who had four children born to them, 
three of whom survive. Fremont Hoy resides at Woodstock and is 
connected with several of the best known banks in the county. A 
complete sketch of the Hoy family is given in the sketch of M. D. Hoy, 
the grandfather of Clarence F. Hoy. 

The boyhood of Clarence F. Hoy was passed in his native county, 
and after he had completed courses in the common and high schools 
here, he attended Beloit College, from which he was graduated. Fol- 
lowing that, he was engaged in an insurance business for three years, 
leaving it to engage in a banking business at Huntley. There he re- 
mained until the close of 1912, and in November, 1913, he became 
manager of the Hoy Banking Company, it having been then organized. 



654 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

It was a private bank of the highest standing and reliability, with a 
capital stock of $25,000, until its reorganization into a state bank. Its 
cashier is Kenneth Hoy, a brother. Mr. Hoy was formerly vice-president 
of the United State Bank of Crystal Lake, 111., of which Fremont Hoy 
was president, until disposing of their interests there in January, 1919, 
and Mr. Hoy is also vice-president of the Fox River Valley State Bank 
of McIIcnry. Like his father, he is well known in financial circles as a 
man of probity and an expert banker. 

In 1908 Mr. Hoy was married to Miss Beatrice Boyd, a daughter of 
Edward K. Boyd, a prominent resident of Chicago. Mr. and Mrs. 
Hoy have a son: Hamilton B., who was born April 2, 1915. Mr. Hoy 
is a Republican. Mrs. Hoy is a Christian Scientist. Both are among 
the leaders in the best circles of Crystal Lake, where they reside and 
their influence can be relied upon in all movements tending toward a 
betterment of existing conditions. 



GEORGE H. HOY. 



George H. Hoy, one of the leading financiers of McHenry County, is 
president of the Farmers Exchange Bank of Woodstock, and comes of 
one of the old and honored families of this section of the state. He 
was born February 21, 1853, in McHenry County, a son of Marmaduke 
and Catherine Maria (Alberty) Hoy. Marmaduke Hoy was born in 
Schoharie County, N. Y., March 3, 1821, and he died May 15, 1912. 
His first wife, the mother of George H. Hoy, was born in Green County, 
N. Y., February 19, 1821, and died July 23, 1863. On October 4, 1864, 
Marmaduke Hoy was married (second) to Esther Eleanor Atwater, who 
was born in Schoharie County, N. Y., February 20, 1833, and is now 
deceased. By his first marriage, Marmaduke had five children. 

George H. Hoy attended the common and high schools of Woodstock, 
and then took a commercial course at Bryant & Stratton's Business 
College at Chicago. Returning to Woodstock, he entered with his 
father into the mercantile business and later into the banking business, 
which were conducted in the same building now occupied by the bank 
of which Mr. Hoy is president. The bank being originally carried on as 
a private bank and in January, 1916, organized as a state bank. 

In 1877 Mr. Hoy was married to Miss Mary L. Belcher, a member 
of an old and prominent family of the county, who located here in 184 1. 













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HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 655 

Mr. and Mrs. Hoy have two children, namely: William P., who is 
cashier of the State Bank of Huntley; and Walter G., who is engaged in 
an extensive contracting business in Northern Illinois. Mr. Hoy is a 
Republican, and has been a member of the city council, served Wood- 
stock as mayor, and had long service on the school board. He and his 
family belong to the Presbyterian church. A man of unusual ability, 
he has exerted himself in behalf of his community, and is justly numbered 
among the most representative and influential men of the county. 



JOHN M. HOY. 



John M. Hoy, cashier of the Farmers Exchange State Bank of Wood- 
stock, and treasurer of the city of Woodstock, is one of the most repre- 
sentative men of McHenry County. He was born at Woodstock, April 
5, 1872, a son of M. D. and Esther Eleanor (Atwater) Hoy, an extended 
sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work. 

John M. Hoy attended the public schools of Woodstock, and was 
graduated from its high school in 1890. His first business experience 
was gained as a member of the mercantile firm of M. D. Hoy & Sons, 
merchants of Woodstock, but he later went to Huntley to serve as cashier 
of the bank established by his father and brothers in that city. In 1903, 
he was offered his present position, and left the Huntley State Bank, 
where he was succeeded by his nephew William P. Hoy, and assumed 
charge of the duties of cashier of the Farmers Exchange State Bank of 
Woodstock. When the bank at Huntley was re-organized under a state 
charter, he was made its president, and still holds that office. For 
several years he has served Woodstock as city treasurer. 

On November 11, 1896, Mr. Hoy was married to Miss Letah M. 
Bunker, a daughter of the late Amos K. Bunker. Mr. Hoy recently 
served as secretary of Group 4, Illinois Banking Association and declined 
the chairmanship for this year. The influence of the Hoy family upon 
the financial development of McHenry County cannot hardly be over- 
estimated, and it is certainly due to its members that the banks of this 
section rest upon so solid a foundation, and that the interests of the 
depositors are safeguarded as they are by sound and conservative 
policies. 



656 HISTORY OF MclIBNRY COUNTY 

M. D. HOY. 

There are old and honorable Dames in McHenry County thai have 
long been prominently identified with its development and leading 
interests, and thus particularly invite attention from a faithful historian. 
One of these names is that of Hoy, and in the life and character of the 
late M. D. Hoy were illustrated those indomitable traits and sturdy 
virtues that have made this family notable and successful in various 
lines of activity for generations. An early settler in McHenry County, 
Mr. Hoy laid the foundation stone upon which he built up a great 
enterprise at Woodstock, and entered upon and maintained honorable, 
useful and friendly relations with his fellow citizens until the close of a 
worthy life. 

Marmaduke, or M. D. Hoy, which was his preferred signature from 
early youth, was born near Gilboa, in Schoharie County, N. Y., March 
3, 1821. He was of Scotch-Irish extraction on both ancestral lines. 
His paternal grandfather, Marmaduke Hoy, was a native of Ireland, 
and for more than a century the Hoys belonged to County Antrim. In 
1805 two of the sons of Marmaduke Hoy emigrated to America, Richard 
and Marmaduke, and still later other members of the family also came 
to the United States. 

Richard Hoy was born in 1784, in the parish of Upperwood, Ireland, 
sixty miles distant from Dublin. He assisted his father on their small 
farm and afterward worked for several years at the shoemaking trade 
in the city of Dublin, but he was not satisfied with his business pros- 
pects there and in 1805, accompanied by his younger brother, crossed 
the Atlantic ocean to New York. The brothers separated, the younger 
entering into military service in a New York regiment, and the former 
locating in Schoharie County, where he found opportunity to continue 
wink at his trade in an establishment conducted by a Mr. Stevens, 
whose sister-in-law, Sarah Fanning, he subsequently married. She was 
born in New York, October 15, 1785, and was the youngest daughter of 
Capt. Walter and Grace (Benjamin) Fanning. Captain Fanning was an 
officer during the War of 1812 and during his later years was a farmer. 
He was a descendant of Edmond Fanning, who came from Ireland to 
Stonington, Conn., in 1641, after his father, Domican Fanning, a man 
of political note, had been beheaded by order of Oliver Cromwell. The 
Fanning family has many distinguished representatives in the United 
States today. Richard Hoy removed to Albany, N. Y., after marriage, 
and conducted a grocery store there for six years and then removed to 



HISTORY OF McIIENRY COUNTY 657 

Gilboa, in Schoharie County, and resumed work at his trade and also 
kept a toll gate on the main highway. His death occurred in 1831 at 
Stamford, in Delaware County, N. Y. He was the father of six children, 
Marmaduke being the fifth in order of birth. 

M. D. Hoy impressed his neighbors and associates in McHenry 
County as a well-informed and educated man. His educational training 
had been more thorough than many youths enjoyed and early prepared 
him for the position of school teacher, and he taught in Green County, 
N. Y., for a number of winter terms, devoting his summers to work on 
the farm. He became deeply interested about the time of his marriage 
in the wider opportunities being offered in what was then the far west, 
and shortly afterward, when the completion of the Erie Canal made 
transportation safe and possible across the state, started for Illinois. 
Rough weather was encountered on the lakes and they put in at the 
village of Chicago, reaching Southport, now Kenosha, Wis., May 23, 
1844, and from there made their way to Alden Township, McHenry 
County, 111. They soon became settled residents there, and Mr. Hoy 
took a prominent part in public matters, and concerned himself with the 
progress and advancement of the neighborhood, and in 1865 he was 
elected county clerk. He removed then to Woodstock and for the next 
eight years devoted himself to the duties of the county office and at the 
end of that time embarked in a mercantile business in partnership with 
his son, George H. Hoy, which was developed into an extensive enter- 
prise. 

Mr. Hoy was married in Lockport, N. Y., June 15, 1843, to Miss 
Catherine Maria Alberty, who was born in Green County, N. Y., 
February 19, 1821, and died July 23, 1863. The following children were 
born to them: Sarah Delia, born October 10, 1847; Luman Thomas, born 
October 28, 1850; George H., born February 21, 1853; Fremont, born 
June 1, 1856; and Jennie, born June 26, 1859, died September 21, 1861. 
Mr. Hoy was married (second) October 4, 1864, to Esther Eleanor 
Atwater, who was born in Schoharie County, N. Y., February 20, 1833, 
and is now deceased. There were two children born to the second 
marriage, Kittie A., who died in 1883, and John M., who was born April 
5, 1872. The sons of Mr. Hoy are all identified with the banking business 
in McHenry County, and are leading factors in the financial field. 

During the Civil War Mr. Hoy was an ardent supporter of the Union 
cause and few citizens of Alden Township were more active in patriotic 
work during that period. He was associated with Stephen Alberty, 
William Barnes, William Wedgewood and other loyal men on the local 



658 HISTORY OF McHENBY COUNT! 

committee to promote enlistments and it should go on public record thai 
these men finding that the raising of funds to pay the soldiers' bounties 
at the time impossible, did not hesitate to raise the needed money on 
their personal notes. It was a noble act of patriotism and saved the 
township a large amount of discount money. He was a sound Repub- 
lican and faithfully supported the party's candidates. Many offices of 
trust and responsibility were tendered him and he served as a justice of 
the peace, highway commissioner and township treasurer. He was a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Hoy died May 15, 
1912. 



WILLIAM P. HOY. 



The name of Hoy is associated with banking of the highest class in 
McHenry County, those bearing the name having been associated with 
the finances of the various communities here for many years. William 
P. Hoy is cashier of the State Bank of Huntley, his associates in the 
bank being as follows: John M. Hoy, president; John T. Kelley, vice 
president ; and W. B. Bartlet, assistant cashier. This bank was originally 
known as the bank of M. D. Hoy & Sons, being organized as such 
May 1, 1901, and was incorporated as a state bank in 1913, with a 
capital stock of $50,000; now has a surplus of $25,000. 

William P. Hoy was born at Woodstock, March 6, 1879, a son of 
George M. and Mary M. (Belcher) Hoy. George M. Hoy, president 
of the Farmers State Bank of Woodstock, is a son of M. D. Hoy, now 
deceased, a complete sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work. 
William P. Hoy attended the common and high schools of Woodstock, 
and was graduated in 1901 from the University of Wisconsin. Imme- 
diately thereafter, he entered the Farmers State Bank of Woodstock, 
remaining there as a clerk in the counting room, until he accepted his 
present position in 1903, succeeding his uncle, John M. Hoy, who then 
became cashier of the Farmers State Bank of Woodstock. 

In 1902 Mr. Hoy was married to Miss Claribelle Wright, a daughter 
of A. S. Wright, prominent in Woodstock circles. Mr. and Mrs. Hoy 
have the following children: Adelbert W., who was born April 12, 1906; 
George Marmaduke, who was born May 30, 1909; and Mary Louise, 
who was born June 12, 1912. Mr. and Mrs. Hoy belong to the Con- 
gregational church. He belongs to the Royal Arcanum, the Odd Fellows, 
and is a Mystic Worker. Politically he is a staunch Republican. 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 659 

MRS. MARY H. (HUBKA) HRDLICKE. 

Mrs. Mary H. (Hubka) Hrdlicke, postmistress at Cary Station, is 
one of the most efficient officials in the government service within the 
confines of McHenry County, and one who is most highly respected. 
She was born at Chicago, 111., May 30, 1864, a daughter of John H. 
and Barbara Hubka, who had six children. John H. Hubka was born 
in Europe, and was brought to the United States by his parents when 
he was seven years old. He learned to make shoes, and locating at 
Chicago engaged in their manufacture, being so engaged at the time 
of his death, July 10, 1893. His widow survives and lives at Chicago. 

Mary H. Hubka attended the common and high schools of Chicago. 
She was married June 24, 1890, to Frank H. Hrdlicke, born in Europe, 
who was also a shoe manufacturer. He died May 21, 1910, leaving her 
with one child, Mamie H., who is the wife of Dr. George B. Allen. 
Doctor Allen was graduated from the Chicago College of Medicine, 
Northwestern University, and was an interne of Michael Reese Hos- 
pital, Chicago. At present he is engaged in a general practice at South 
Bend., Ind., and is special medical adviser of the Studebaker auto- 
mobile plant. 

Mrs. Hrdlicke is a Democrat, and an appointee of President Wilson. 
She took the civil service examination for her position February 12, 
1913. The post office is located in one of the rooms of the business 
block owned at Cary by Mrs. Hrdlicke, and she also owns her residence 
at Cary. She belongs to the Catholic church. 



MARTIN H. HUBRIG. 



Martin H. Hubrig, M. D., the only resident physician of Algonquin, 
is one of the honored members of the profession in McHenry County, 
and a conscientious and capable man. He was born in Wisconsin, 
June 11, 1889, a son of Henry and Anna (Krueger) Hubrig, who had 
five children. Henry Hubrig, was born in Germany and came to the 
United States when he was eight years old, and located in Wisconsin, 
where he remained until his death, December 5, 1917. His widow 
survives him. 

Doctor Hubrig attended the common and high schools of Wisconsin, 
Valparaiso (Ind.) University, in 1911 and 1912, and the Chicago College 



660 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

of Medicine and Surgery, from which he was graduated May 30, 1916. 
Following his last graduation in his profession, he served for fifteen 
months as interne at the West-Side Hospital, Chicago, and then located 
in Algonquin, coming lure in July of 1917. Doctor Hubrig is a member 
of the Phi Chi Medical Fraternity, the McHenry County Medical 
Society, the Illinois State Medical Society, and the American Medical 
Association. 

In April, 1917, Doctor Hubrig was married to Miss Ida Karolus of 
Wisconsin, a daughter of Henry Karolus, (also of Wisconsin); they 
have two daughters, Pearl Mae, born November 9, 1918, and Norma 
Helen, born January 3, 1920. Doctor and Mrs. Hubrig are members 
of the Lutheran church. His political convictions are independent of 
party ties, but he can be relied upon to give his support to all measures 
looking toward an improvement of civic conditions and the advance- 
ment of his community. 



EARL C. HUGHES. 



Earl C. Hughes, supervisor of Hartland Township, is engaged in 
farming and milk producing upon a very extensive scale, being recog- 
nized as a leader in his line in this part of the county. He was born 
in McHenry County, February 6, 1871, the only child of his parents, 
William E. and Mary Ann (Schryder) Hughes. William E. Hughes 
was born in New York State, but came to McHemy County in 1846, 
locating in Hartland Township, and later lived in Woodstock, where 
he continued to reside until his death, February 19, 1886. He was 
a farmer, and was also connected with the Chicago & Northwestern 
Railroad Company. 

Earl C. Hughes was reared in his native count}' and attended its 
schools. He has 160 acres of choice land in Hartland Township, and 
he has always been a farmer and producer and shipper of milk. In 
1917 Mr. Hughes was elected supervisor of Hartland Township on the 
Citizens' ticket. 

On February 26, 1896, Mr. Hughes was married to Miss Mary L. 
Weidrich, born September 10, 1873, a daughter of Frederick Weidrich, 
and they have the following children: Vera L., who was born September 
6, 1898; Mary V., who was born March 1, 1900; and Earl M., who 
was born September 6, 1907. Mr. Hughes is very proud of the fact 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 661 

that his father was one of the men who fought on the side of the Union 
during the Civil War, being honorably discharged in 1865. Both the 
Hughes and Weidrich families are old and well known ones in this 
part of the state. 



HARRY D. HULL, M. D. 

Harry D. Hull, M. D., one of the most successful physicians and 
surgeons of McHenry County, is engaged in an active practice at Crystal 
Lake, and is a veteran of the World War. He was born at Chicago, 
111., May 20, 1867, one of the four children of Tracy D. and Isabella 
(Streeter) Hull. Tracy D. Hull was one of the well-known real estate 
men of Chicago, where, prior to his death on August 16, 1901, he did 
much in bringing about a healthy and sane expansion of the city's 
boundaries. He was a New Yorker by birth, but came West to Chicago 
at an early day. His wife died July 20, 1877. 

Doctor Hull attended the University of Notre Dame, and after his 
graduation therefrom, entered Rush Medical College, Chicago, from 
which he was graduated in 1891. For the subsequent eight years he 
was engaged in a general practice in Wisconsin, but on January 1, 189S, 
located permanently at Crystal Lake, and has built up a very large 
practice, and is held in the highest esteem by all who know him. He 
is also physician and surgeon for the Northwestern Railroad, and the 
Chicago Telephone and Public Service Company at Crystal Lake, and 
is the attending physician and surgeon of the Cottage Hospital of 
Harvard, owned and operated by Dr. C. M. Johnson, one of the leading 
medical men of Harvard. During his residence at Crystal Lake Doctor 
Hull has been very prominent in civic affairs, and served as mayor of 
the city for two terms. He is now city physician of the municipality, 
and held this office for some years prior to being elected mayor. A 
staunch Republican he is very active in his party. Doctor Hull is one 
of the men of his profession who served during the late war, and received 
his commission as captain September 20, 1918, and was first assigned 
to Camp Greenleaf, Georgia, Base Hospital, and later to the Rockefeller 
Institute, New York and Base Hospital at Camp Lee, Va. He received 
his honorable discharge February 20, 1919, and returned home. 

On April 20, 1892, Doctor Hull was married to Miss Cathryne M. 
Raffen, a daughter of John T. Raffen, and a member of a leading family 
of Chicago. Doctor and Mrs. Hull have two children, namelv: Cathrvne, 



662 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

who is the wife of Victor Breytspraak, of Evanston, 111.; and Marie 
F., who is at home. Mrs. Hull and her daughters belong to the Baptist 
church. Fraternally Doctor Hull is a Mason and a member of the 
Benevolent, and Protective Order of Elks. 

It is doubtful if there are any other men in the profession in the county 
who have so extended their sphere of usefulness, and at the same time 
continued in active practice, as has Doctor Hull, and his work in the 
army was equally effective, and his fellow citizens are appreciative. 
His standing in his calling and community, is unquestionably of the high- 
est in every respect. 



WILLIAM M. HULL. 



William M. Hull is one of the most representative men of Union, 
for he not only conducts a large hardware and saddlery business, but 
also has served the city as fire marshal, and police magistrate, and as a 
member of the school board. He was born in Boone County, 111., 
October 17, 1872, a son of John D. and Olive E. (Gray) Hull. John 
D. Hull was born in New York, but came to Illinois at an early day 
and became one of the prosperous farmers of Boone County, where he 
died in 190S. His wife survives and is living in Boone County. 

William M. Hull was reared on a farm in his native county, and at- 
tended its schools. When he was eighteen years old he began teaming, 
and after several years went into the grocery business. He then was 
a member of a fire department, rising to be assistant fire chief. In the 
meanwhile he learned the trade of harness making, and in 1911 located 
at Union, and opened his present business. He also does shoe repair- 
ing, carrying in all a stock of about SI, 000. In 1916 he was made a 
police magistrate and in 1917 was made fire marshal. Fraternally he 
belongs to the Odd Fellows, Coral Lodge No. 769. Politically he is a 
Republican. 

Mr. Hull was married to Miss Lucy E. Adams, a daughter of George 
Adams, and they have two children, namely: Joseph W., who was born 
August 28, 1909; and Harriett D., who was born March 1, 1913. Mr. 
and Mrs. Hull belong to the Episcopal church. 



CARLTON C. HUNT. 



Carlton C. Hunt, proprietor of the Oak Grove Farm, and general 
manager of the Farmers New Era Telephone Company of Hebron, 




is •* Sro NY 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 663 

is one of the representative men of McHenry County. He was born 
on the old farm in Hebron Township, April 23, 1860, the eldest of the 
five children born of his parents. He continued to reside on this farm 
that eventually became his and his brother, George Hunt's, they oper- 
ating it in partnership. After buying additional land, making the farm 
280 acres in extent, they divided it. Carlton C. Hunt remained on his 
farm until 1919, when he came ro Hebron. He was a dairy-farmer, 
milking from twenty to fifty cows, and bred Holstein cattle until he 
gave that up in favor of milk production. Mr. Hunt also specialized 
in seed growing and the greater part of the wheat raised in this region 
comes from seed that he had produced on his farm. Always a pro- 
gressive man he recognizes the value of concerted action, and is a mem- 
ber of the McHenry County Soil Improvement Association His farm 
is one of the best-improved in the township, and he put in a large amount 
of tile, redeeming a lot of waste land. 

In response to the demand for better telephone service Mr. Hunt 
and others organized in 1904 what is known as the Farmers' New Era 
Telephone Company, .which now has 1,100 subscribers and three ex- 
changes, one at Hebron, one at Richmond, and one at Wilmot. The 
total assets of the company are $129,668.38. Mr. Hunt has always 
been a very strong Republican, and has served on the township board 
and as a justice of the peace, but has not entered county politics. 

When he was thirty-five years old, Mr. Hunt was married to Blanche 
Merchant of Rockford, and they have the following children: Leslie 
R., who married Gertrude Deaner of Harvard, operates the homestead; 
Mina Grace, who is Mrs. Walter Ledger; Blanche Beatrice, who mar- 
ried Clarence Baron; Edith Mary, who is at home, and George W., 
who is attending the Hebron High School. Mr. Hunt is a Mason, a 
member of the Odd Fellows and Modern Woodmen of America, and he 
and his wife are members of the Eastern Star. A wholesome out-of- 
doors man, Mr. Hunt finds recreation in hunting and fishing. All of his 
life he has been exceedingly active, and has not relaxed his lifetime 
habits, the duties of his position as manager of the telephone company 
requiring him to exert himself during a long-hour day. 



GEORGE A. HUNT. 



George A. Hunt, son of George W. and Mary Louville Hunt, was 
born at Oak Grove Farm, Hebron Township, McHenry County, 111., 



664 BISTORY OP McHENRY COUNTY 

January I. L863. He was educated in the common schools. A great 
lover of nature, he took especial delight in the study of birds. His 
father died when he was nineteen years old leaving his brother Carlton, 
three years older, and himself to continue the management of the farm 
and the breeding of purebred livestock and poultry. Mr. Hunt became 
well known as a breeder, exhibitor and judge of livestock. He con- 
tinued in the partnership with his brother on the farm until 1907, when 
he sold out to his brother and moved to Woodstock, where he now 
resides. He was married June 26, 1907, to Miss Mary L. Seal, of 
Roekford, 111. 

Mr. Hunt has always been interested in every public enterprise, 
taking an active part in the County Farmers' Institute, also in the 
McHenry County Fair at which he and his brother were regular exhibitors 
of livestock, poultry and farm products. He was president of the 
Farmers' Institute in 1899, 1900 and 1901 ; put much enthusiasm into the 
work, anil was rewarded by some of the largest gatherings of farmers 
ever held in any institute meetings in the county. He was president 
again in 1911 and 1912; and was also a director of Farmers" Institutes 
for the Eleventh Congressional District for the years 1901 and 1902. 

In 1901 Mr. Hunt conceived the idea of having the farmers of the 
county visit the Universities of Illinois and Wisconsin in order thai 
they might get into closer touch with the work of the agricultural col- 
leges and experiment stations. He therefore organized what was called 
The McHenry County Farmers' Picnic Association. Under the auspices 
of this association an excursion party of 350 farm men and women of 
the county visited the College of Agriculture at Madison, Wis., June 1. 
1901. This was the first Farmers' Institute excursion to an agricultural 
college from any Illinois county. The Harvard Herald in its report of 
this excursion had this to say: "The success of the excursion was due 
to the untiring efforts of the officers of the Picnic Association but no 
one person is entitled to more credit than is George A. Hunt, the origi- 
nator of the project and the most original and tireless worker for the 
farmers' welfare in McHenry County." In 1902 McHenry County 
farmers enjoyed a two-days' excursion to the College of Agriculture at 
Urbana, 111. In 1901 and 1902, Mr. Hunt made comprehensive ex- 
hibits of the agricultural products of McHenry County at the Illinois 
State Fair, winning first prize for the county both years. There were 
over six tons of agricultural products in the 1902 exhibit. In connec- 
tion with these exhibits Mr. Hunt distributed several thousand copies 
of a booklet which he published in 1901 describing the resources, ad- 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 665 

vantages and possibilities of the county. This exhibit was reproduced 
as nearly as possible at the McHenry County Fair in 1903. The grains 
and grasses in this exhibit and the samples of over 100 different kinds 
of wood found in the county were shown in the Illinois exhibit at the 
St. Louis World's Fair in 1904. 

Mr. Hunt was secretary of the McHenry County Fair eight years, 
from 1903 to 1910 inclusive, during which time improvements to the 
value of more than $10,000 were placed on the grounds of the associa- 
tion. As secretary of the McHenry County Fair, Mr. Hunt found that 
the state appropriation for county fairs provided a flat rate of .$200 
annually to each fair regardless of merit. This he considered unfair to 
the more progressive counties, and, believing that the appropriation 
should be made according to merit, a larger amount going to the fairs 
that gave the most encouragement to the agricultural and livestock 
interest of their respective communities, therefore with the co-operation 
of Hon. Len Small, Secretary of the Kankakee Fair, he arranged for a 
convention of county fair managers which was held at Springfield, 
February 14, 1907. 

An organization was formed known as the Illinois Association of 
Agricultural Fairs. This association secured from the legislature an 
appropriation for each fair equal to forty per cent of the premiums paid 
except for speed. This appropriation was afterwards increased to 
sixty percent on the first $1,000 of premiums paid; fifty percent on the 
second $1,000; forty percent on the third $1,000; and thirty percent on 
the fourth $1,000 of premiums paid. Mr. Hunt was secretary of the 
Illinois Association of Fairs six years after which he resigned on account 
of the pressure of other work. 

Mr. Hunt was superintendent of the Illinois Dairy Exhibits at the 
St. Louis Exposition in 1904. He made a very creditable showing for 
the state. His design showing bust statues of President Grant and 
President Lincoln, and a large statue representing Illinois, all made 
with pure creamery butter, was very highly commended. 

In March of the same year, 1904, Mr. Hunt was instrumental in 
organizing The Farmers' New Era Telephone Company which grew in 
a few years from a $5,000 company to a $60,000 corporation with many 
miles of toll line and with exchanges in Hebron and Richmond, 111., and 
Wilmot, Wis. While George A. Hunt was the originator of the project 
and is president of the company, he gives to his brother, Carlton C. 
Hunt, the larger share of the credit for the company's continued success. 

In July, 1911, Mr. Hunt became associated with Eugene D. Funk 



666 BISTORY <>!•' McHENRY COUNTY 

and Arthur J. Bill, of Bloomington, 111., and others, as secretary of the 
Fanners' Publishing Company, publishers of the Farmers' Voipe. Two 
years later this publication was merged with the Prairie Farmer, of 
Chicago, Mr. Hunt becoming manager of livestock advertising which 
posit ion he now holds. 

Politically, Mr. Hunt is a Republican ami although not an active 
politician he is interested in all measures intended to benefit the com- 
munity. He has been connected with the church for a number of years 
and is a member of the First Methodist Episcopal church of Woodstock. 
He is also connected with the Modern Woodmen, being a member of 
Progress Camp No. 229, Woodstock. His father, George W. Hunt, 
was born in Orangeville, Genesee County, New York, July 16, 1835. 
He came with his parents to Walworth County, Wis., in 1839; was 
educated at Milton College and engaged for a time with his father in 
the mercantile business. After his marriage, March 31, 1859, he made 
his home on the farm later known as Oak Grove Farm, Hebron Town- 
ship, McHenry County, Illinois. His great-grandfather came to this 
country from England or Wales and was a soldier in the Revolutionary 
war. George A. Hunt's mother was Mary Louville, daughter of Alvin 
H. and Mary Horsford Parker. She was born in South Bristol, Ontario 
County, N. Y., April 17, 1835; came with her parents to McHenry 
County, 111, in June, 1841, and died March 7, 1918. Mr. Hunt's wife, 
Mary L., daughter of Christopher and Sarah Finch Seal, was born in 
Rockford, III., December 14, 1867. Her father and mother were of 
sturdy English stock, coming to this country in July, 1855, making the 
voyage in a sailing vessel which required six weeks to cross the ocean. 
They came at once to Illinois and made their home in Winnebago County, 
where they resided for more than fifty years. Mr. and Mrs. George A. 
Hunt reside at 425 West South Street, Woodstock. 



E. R. JACKMAN. 



E. R. Jackman, one of the highly respected residents of Crystal 
Lake, is now living retired from the activities of life, although in former 
years he was one of the worth-while farmers of McHenry County. 
He was born two miles south of Crystal Lake in Algonquin Township, 
on the homestead of his family, November 15, 1863. He is a son of 
Rodney D. and Elizabeth L. (Rowley) Jackman, the former born in 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 667 

New York, Juno 10, 1821, died November 2, 1884, and the latter, horn 
March 7, 1825, died in Juno, 1905. They were married in McHenry 
County, May 16, 1848. 

Between the ages of twenty-three and twenty-four, Rodney D. 
Jackmau came to Illinois, driving through from Warren County, Pa., 
to join his uncle, James Jackman, who had secured considerable land 
in McHenry County, from whom Rodney D. Jackman bought a farm. 
A year later, his father, William Jackman, arrived in McHenry County, 
and the two bought another farm, and the father conducted a little 
store at Crystal Lake. In time another son, James, became a partner 
with his grandfather. The last years of William Jackman were spent 
with his son, James, and he died about 1872 or 1873. Rodney D. 
Jackman remained on his farm of 155 acres until just before his death, 
when he moved to Crystal Lake. His brother, James, lived in Crystal 
Lake, where he was in an insurance business, until 1917. He was 
also president of the Crystal State Bank. His son, William, is in 
Idaho; and his daughter, Susie, who is Mrs. John Fish of Woodstock, 
has a daughter, Flora, who is Mrs. Bert Colby, and Mrs. Colby lives 
at Loyal, Wis. A brother of James and Rodney D. Jackman, William 
Jackman, died while still a young man, leaving two children, the daughter 
only surviving, she being Mrs. Levi Landon of Chicago. 

Rodney D. Jackman and his wife had the following children : Amelia, 
who is Mrs. Ellis Spencer, is a widow of Crystal Lake; Kate, who is 
Mrs. Thomas Ford of Oak Park, 111.; E. R., whose name heads this 
review; Charley, who is a mail carrier of Elgin, 111. Ezra R. Jackman 
owns the old farm, having bought out the other heirs, although prior 
to that he had leased it from his mother, taking charge of it when he 
was twenty-four years old. For several years he was in a mercantile 
business at Crystal Lake with his brother, Charley, but later returned 
to the farm, where his first wife died. In 1915 he located permanently 
at Crystal Lake, where he has since lived. He built a barn on his farm, 
which has a cement floor and other modern conveniences, and a silo. 
The house was erected by his father, who spent the greater part of his 
married life in it. While conducting the farm, E. R. Jackman kept 
about thirty cows, milk being his leading feature. As this farm was 
prairie land, it was not nearly so hard to develop it as those in the timber. 
Like his father, Mr. Jackman is no politician, the older man espousing, 
however, first the principles of the Whig party, and later those of the 
Republican. All his life Rodney D. Jackman was a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church at Crystal Lake, but his son does not 



668 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTS 

belong to any religious organization, although he is a liberal supporter 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, of which his wife is a member. 

On October 7, 1887, E. R. Jackman was married to Carrie Adriance 
of Crystal Lake, who died August 29, 1901, leaving him with four chil- 
dren, namely: Ralph; Mrs. Hazel Wingate, who married Clifton Win- 
gate of Nunda Township; Lester; and Leon. Of these children, Ralph 
was married to Ida M. Schrader, who died, leaving two children, Loris 
and Elroy, and after her demise, Ralph left the old farm where he had 
been living. Leon enlisted for service in the regular army, First Regi- 
ment of Engineers, July 5, 1916, and was sent to Eagle Pass, Tex., and 
from there to Washington, D. C, to act as guard at the White House. 
He was then assigned to the Seventh Regiment Engineers at Fort 
Leavenworth, Kan., and sent to France in March, 1918, and was at 
the front from July, 1918, until the signing of the Armistice, following 
which he was in the Army of Occupation in Luxemburg, and during 
his period of service was in France and Italy, and advanced from private 
to corporal and then sergeant. Lester is another son who has upheld 
the family name in military service, going into the National Army 
under the Selective Draft, and after being trained at Camp Fremont, 
was sent abroad, and was with the Siberian Contingent. 

E. R. Jackman was married (second) to Mrs. Ida E. Hill, of St. 
Charles, 111., born at Aurora, a daughter of Daniel and Mary (Parker) 
Sinclair, and widow of John Hill of Grenada, Miss. There are no 
children. The Jackman is one of the best known families in Algonquin 
Township, and its members are commanding confidence and respect 
both at home and abroad. 



WILLIAM JACKSON. 
Page 139. 

JOHN JANAK. 



John Janak, proprietor of the leading garage of Algonquin, and dealer 
in agricultural implements, lumber, wagons, buggies, road wagons, 
wood and iron pumps, Plymouth binder twine and similar commodities, 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 669 

is one of the best known men in this locality. He was born in Bohemia, 
May 11, 1862, a son of Frank and Frances (Joblonrski) Janak, the 
former of whom was a native of Bohemia, who brought his family to 
the United States in 1872, and after a short stoppage at Spring Lake, 
111., went to California, where he lived until his death in March, 1916. 
His wife died in 1895. 

John Janak was ten years old when brought to the United States, 
and he attended the Algonquin schools. All of his mature years he has 
been engaged in his present business, and branched out when he built 
his garage at a cost of $7,000, disposing at that time of a livery business 
he owned. 

On June 22, 1892, Mr. Janak was married to Miss Josephine Suchy, 
a daughter of Franklin Suchy, Bohemians. Mr. and Mrs. Janak 
became the parents of the following children: Valentine, who is the wife 
of Fred Schutie, city marshal of Algonquin; Edward, who enlisted in 
the United States army in 1915 as a private, became a sergeant with 
the Philippine Coast Artillery; Edna, who is at home; Elmer, who was 
with the United States navy; and George, who was a quartermaster 
in the United States army. Mr. and Mrs. Janak and their family 
belong to the Congregational church. He is a Republican. His fra- 
ternal relations are with the Woodmen of the World. A fine business 
man, Mr. Janak has made a success of his undertakings, and is numbered 
among the successful residents of McHenry County. 



EMILUS C. JEWETT. 



Emilus C. Jewett, president of the State Bank of Woodstock, and 
one of the leading financiers of McHenry County, is held in the highest 
esteem by all who know him. He was born on a farm in McHenry 
County, January 29, 1854, a son of Walter P. and Harriet C. (Horton) 
Jewett, who had five children, two of whom grew to maturity. Walter 
P. Jewett was born in Vermont, but in 1836 came to Rockford, 111., 
and to McHenry County in 1838. He was a farmer until his death 
which occurred in 1879. 

Attending the public schools, Emilus C. Jewett spent his young 
manhood in Woodstock, and entered the counting room of the First 
National Bank of Woodstock; he remained there for eight years, leaving 
it to start in the shoe business, in which he remained for seven years. 



670 HISTORY OF McHENBT COUNTY 

The following two years he spent in the Northwest, and then in 1887, 
he, with E. E. Richards, formed the firm of Richards & Jewett to handle 
an abstract business which is now incorporated as the Richards, Jewett 
& Wright Abstract Company. In December, 1889, he became cashier 
of the State Bank of Woodstock at the time of its organization, and 
later was made its president, in 1915. His knowledge of the banking 
business is intimate, and under his able direction the affairs of his bank 
are in admirable condition. 

In 1879 Mr. Jewett was united in marriage with Miss Alice C. 
Eckert, a daughter of Jacob Eckert of McHenry County, and they 
had two children, namely: Jessie E., married Raymond F. Pfeiffer. 
and Helen A., married Roscoe G. Brewer. She has two children: 
Harriet Horton and Roscoe G., Jr. Mrs. Jewett passed from this life. 
April 12, 1912. The family attend the Congregational church. Polit- 
ically Mr. Jewett is a Republican. His fraternal affiliations are with 
the Masons and Elks, and he is as popular with these organizations a- 
he is with the community at large. 



GEORGE H. JOHNSON. 

George H. Johnson, manager of the Wilbur Lumber Company at 
West McHenry, 111., is a young man of wide experience and knowledge, 
and is admirably fitted for the duties of his present position. He was 
born in McHenry County, December 30, 1886, a son of Benjamin and 
Caroline (Anderson) Johnson, who had three children. Benjamin 
Johnson was for many j^ears a farmer, and is now living at Crystal 
Lake, 111. 

George H. Johnson attended the common and high schools of Crystal 
Lake, and was graduated from the latter in 1906, and engaged with the 
Wilbur Lumber Company's plant at West McHenn\ In 1912 he 
accepted a position with W. G. Wheeler at Rockford, acting as traveling 
salesman for four years. Mr. Johnson then became manager for the 
Alexander Lumber Company at Waynesville, 111., and he remained 
there until October 14, 1918, when he was appointed cashier of the 
Bank of Ringwood to fill the vacancy left by the death of R. G. Wharton. 
On March 1, 1920, he severed his connection with the Bank of Ringwood 
and accepted the managership of the Wilbur Lumber Company yard 
at West McHenry. 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 671 

On June 3, 1914, Mr. Johnson was married to Miss Mabel M. Granger, 
a daughter of Frank K. Granger, and a member of an important McHenry 
family. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson became the parents of three children, 
namely: Margaret I., who was born August 16, 1915; George E., who 
was born February 14, 1917; and Frank K, who was born June 21, 1920. 
Mr. Johnson is independent in his political views. Fraternally he 
belongs to McHenry Lodge No. 158, A. F. & A. M.; McHenry Chapter, 
No. 547, O. E. S., and to the Modern Woodmen of America. He is 
held in the highest esteem wherever he has lived, and his ability is 
recognized by all who know him. 



HORACE W. JOHNSON, M. D. 

Horace W. Johnson, M. D., now deceased, was the first practicing 
physician of Harvard, and one of the pioneer members of the medical 
profession of McHenry County. He was born in New York City, N. Y., 
December 16, 1810, the eldest of the three children of Jacob and Maria 
(Johnson) Johnson. After completing his academic courses in New 
York City, he was graduated from Rutger College, New Jersey, having 
been under the preceptorship of Valentine Mott, Sr. For the subsequent 
six years Doctor Johnson was engaged in practice in New York City, 
but in 1836 came west and from then until 1856, practiced in Kenosha, 
Wis., when he came to Harvard. 

When Doctor Johnson came to what is now Harvard, the present 
site of the city was occupied by a field of waving corn, and not the most 
optimistic could have visioned the present surroundings. However, 
Doctor Johnson did have faith in the future of the neighborhood, and 
was here located until his death, February 24, 1871. On November 9, 
1842 he was married at Bloomfield, Wis., to Adaline A. La Tour, a native 
of New York City, born August 27, 1823, a daughter of James and 
Christina (Kipp) La Tour. Doctor and Mrs. Johnson had a family 
as follows: Col. M. Johnson, M. D., of Harvard, and three sons and 
two daughters who died early in life. The grandfather of Mrs. Johnson, 
Anthony William La Tour, came to the United States from France 
with General Lafayette, served in the American Revolution as an officer, 
and later had the honor of being one to entertain the distinguished 
French official when he re-visited this country many years after the 
close of the war in which both had participated. In the spring of 1841, 



67:2 EISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

the parents of Mrs. Johnson brought her to Walworth County, Wis., 
where they permanently settled. 



COLONEL M. JOHNSON, M. D. 

Colonel M. Johnson, M. D., one of the prominent members of the 
medical profession of McHenry County, is the proprietor of the Cottage 
Hospital of Harvard, which was the first hospital in the county. He 
was born at Kenosha, Wis., May 2, 1854, one of six children born to 
Horace W. and Adeline Amelia (La Tour) Johnson. Horace W. Johnson 
was a well known physician and surgeon of New York City, where he 
was born, and later of Wisconsin. He finally came to Harvard, 111., 
where he died February 22, 1871. His widow survived him many 
years, passing away in March, 1901. 

Doctor Johnson attended the common and high schools of Harvard, 
Notre Dame University, from which he was graduated in 1871, the 
University of Michigan, from which he was graduated in September, 
1875. He took a post-graduate course at Bellevue Hospital, New York 
City for a year, and then in 1876, located at Harvard, where he has 
since remained. Subsequently he built his hospital, at a cost of over 
$15,000. This hospital has accommodation for thirty-two patients, and 
seven nurses. Doctor Johnson belongs to the county, state and national 
medical societies. He is a Democrat, and has served as city physician, 
treasurer, alderman and mayor of Harvard, and has very well satisfied 
his constituents in all these offices. He is a Thirty-second Degree and 
Shriner Mason, and also belongs to the Illinois Historical Society. 

Doctor Johnson was married to Elizabeth Jolly and divorced from 
her. They had one son, namely: Horace W., who is engaged in a real- 
estate and insurance business at Chicago. Doctor Johnson was married 
(second) to Miss Helen E. Downes, a daughter of Richard H. Downes 
of Onconta, N. Y. Doctor and Mrs. Johnson have one son, Colonel 
R. M., who is at home. Both in private practice and as the head of 
his own hospital, Doctor Johnson has attained to a well deserved popu- 
larity, and those under his charge arc certain of receiving expert atten- 
tion and the most modern of hospital service, without going to the 
expense and trouble of visiting Chicago. 



HISTORY OF McHENEY COUNTY 673 

SAMUEL A. JOHNSTONE. 

Samuel A. Johnstone, one of the progressive general farmers and 
dairymen of McHenry County, owns and operates 120 acres of land on 
section 36, Nunda Township. He was born in Scotland, May 13, 1856. 
a son of William and Margaret (Stelle) Johnstone, natives of Scotland, 
who came to the United States in 1869, and located on the farm now 
owned by their son. Here the father died at the age of sixty-eight years. 
He was a Presbyterian in religious faith. There were nine children in 
his family, namely: Isabella, Samuel A., Janette, Richard, William. 
Robert, Margaret, John and Fred. 

Samuel A. Johnstone attended the schools of Scotland and McHenry 
County. He was married to Jennie Kirkpatrick, born at Elgin, 111., a 
daughter of William and Mary Kirkpatrick, natives of Scotland. Mr. 
and Mrs. Johnstone have four children, namely: William K., who is 
in the United States navy, and has been for twelve years; Melvill George, 
who is also in the navy, on the Texas; Robert C; and Samuel A. The 
only daughter, Maggie, died at the age of twelve years. Mr. and Mrs. 
Johnstone are correctly numbered among the thoroughly representa- 
tive people of the county, and their sons are living up to the high stand- 
ards of the family on both sides. 



MERRITT L. JOSLYN. 

Page 138. 



TIMOTHY KANALY. 

Timothy Kanaly, now deceased, was formerly one of the successful 
farmers of Seneca Township, and a man universally liked. He was 
born near Cork, Ireland, in July, 1836, and died January 23, 1910. His 
father died when he was small, and when he was ten years old, Timothy 
Kanaly was brought to the United States by relatives. Later he sent 
for his mother to join him. Until he was eighteen years old, he remained 



674 BISTORT? OF McHENRY COUNTY 

in New York, a portion of that period working for a gardener, but in 
1854, he came to McHenry County, and was for a time employed by 
Thomas Richards, and helped tu set out the evergreens that have since 
given the name of Evergreen to one of the school districts. On January 
6, 1858, he was married to Johanna Nihan, who was born in Pennsyl- 
vania in November, L838, the ceremony taking place at St. Patrick's 
Church at Hartland. She had come to McHenry County with her 
parents, James and Mary Nihan, who located in Seneca Township, 
where both died when about eighty years old, and they are buried in 
the pioneer cemetery of Seneca Township. 

After his marriage Timothy Kanaly located on the farm in Seneca 
Township that is still owned by the family, and he built a shanty on it. 
There was no road leading to it, and everything was undeveloped. In 
order to earn a little money, he leased a yoke of oxen, and with them 
used to work for $1 per day, going four or five miles to work. He cut 
wood at fifty cents per cord, hauling it five miles to Marengo. Just 
as fast as he could, he kept on adding to his original purchase of fifteen 
acres, until he had 220 in his homestead. The little shanty, he replaced 
with a frame house still standing, but the present residence has been 
built at different periods. The original barn was built from stumps, 
covered with hay, but in 1873 he erected the present barn. Mrs. Kanaly 
made butter which was sold to customers at Marengo. He was a Dem- 
ocrat of the old school, and never missed an election. While he was 
firm in his convictions, he was not a man to argue, and his boys are all 
the same as he in this respect. When they first came there, Mr. and 
Mi's. Kanaly would walk twelve miles to Hartland for religious services, 
and when the Marengo church was established, they were among its 
oldest members. Mrs. Kanaly survives her husband, and lives on the 
farm. 

The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Kanaly were as follows: Timothy, 
who lives on a farm adjoining the homestead; Mary Ann, who is the 
widow of J. Riley of Marengo; Cornelius, who is with the Commonwealth 
Edison Company, of Chicago, has been a resident of that city for thirty 
years; and Daniel and James, twins, and Katherine, who are all at 
home. The two sons last named conduct the farm. Daniel is active 
in township affairs, having served on the election board, and also on 
the school board. The Kanaly family is one of the highly esteemed 
ones of McHenry County, and the sons are numbered among the suc- 
cessful farmers of Seneca Township. 



HISTORY OF McIIENRY COUNTY 675 

EDWARD C. KAPPLER. 

Edward C. Kappler, senior member of the well-known grocery firm 
of Kappler & Deitz, is one of the leading men in his line at Woodstock, 
and a well-known figure in McHenry County. He was born at Wood- 
stock, April 3, 1874, one of the four children of Charles and Lena (Miller) 
Kappler. Charles Kappler was a farmer, and was engaged in that line 
of endeavor until his death which occurred in 1912. 

Edward C. Kappler attended the grammar and high schools of 
Woodstock, and has always been identified with the best interests of 
his native place. Mr. Kappler first formed a partnership under the name 
of Kennedy & Kappler, and sold out his interests there in 1913. Later 
he bought out S. L. Hunt, and he took Arlie A. Deitz as his business 
associate. The firm carries a full and carefully assorted line of staple 
and fancy groceries averaging $8,000, and do an annual business of 
.$100,000. The selling force is composed of ten experienced people, 
and excellent service is rendered. During the late war, this firm cheer- 
fully lived up to -all the government regulations, and deserves the 
heavy patronage it receives. 

Mr. Kappler is Democratic in his political faith. Fraternally he 
belongs to the Odd Fellows, Elks and Woodmen. His residence is at 
No. 335 Lincoln Street. The business policy of this firm is to render 
the best service and sell the highest grade of goods at prices as low as 
is consistent with their quality, and the market quotations. 



PATRICK KEATING. 



Patrick Keating, now living retired at Huntley, is one of the most 
highly respected men of McHenry County, and formerly took an 
active part in the agricultural life here and is still the owner of a large 
amount of farm land. He was born in Kane County, 111., five miles 
south of Huntley, April 15, 1843, a son of Edward and Mary (Tobin) 
Keating, both natives of County Tipperary, Ireland, where they were 
married. 

Upon coming to the United States, they proceeded direct to Illinois 
and soon were settled on a farm in Kane County, 111., where Edward 
Keating rounded out his life, and after his death his widow moved to 
a farm near Crystal Lake, in Grafton Township, and after ten or twelve 



676 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

years, went to live at Elgin, III. They hail the following children: 
William, who was originally a fanner, became a fireman on the Chicago 
& Northwestern Railroad, and was killed near Dubuque, Iowa; Patrick, 
whose name heads this review; Thomas, who at one time conducted 
a blacksmith shop at Huntley, lived for a time at Chicago, and is now 
a resident of Elgin, 111.; and Edward, who was a lieutenant on the 
Chicago police force, in charge of the Stanton Avenue Station, and later 
chief of detectives, is now deceased. 

Patrick Keating remained in Kane County until he attained his 
majority, working by the month on neighboring farms, and then con- 
ducted his mother's farm in Grafton Township for four years. He then 
bought eighty acres of land three and one-half miles northwest of 
Huntley, going into debt for it. Not only did he clear off this debt, 
but he erected a fine set of buildings on the property, making it one of 
the best farms in this region, and also began adding to it until he had 240 
acres. This farm is rolling prairie land, with several flat tracts, which 
he drained, thus redeeming about sixty acres. The house was built 
in 1883, and the barn in 1876, but. the latter he replaced in 1915 by a 
line daily barn, with full basement, 36 x 120 feet, and 16-foot posts, 
all of the stabling being in the basement. There is also a horse barn 
36 x 70 feet and the necessary outbuildings, including a commodious 
milk house and silo, 16 x 50 feet. These buildings are on a slight ele- 
vation, commanding a fine view of the surrounding country, and they 
can be seen for miles about. Mr. Keating's holdings are heavy, he 
owning 1,400 acres of land, all of which is in McHenry County with the 
exception of a 200-acre farm a part of which is in Kane County. These 
McHenry County farms are as follows: the old William Miller farm 
of 160 acres; the Koppen farm of 120 acres; the Henry Sinnett farm 
of 240 acres; the John Kreutzer farm of 160 acres; the Salow farm of 
140 acres; and the Scott farm of 196 acres, and other valuable .lands. 
Mr. Keating has paid as high as $140, and as low as .$26.25 per acre, 
for his land. As he bought these various farms, he began making im- 
provements, either erecting new buildings, or remodeling the old ones; 
>iuking wells, putting in windmills, cementing the floors in the big barns, 
using several miles of tiling in properly draining the low places, and doing 
everything to bring his properties up to the highest standards of modern 
efficiency. On his homestead he made it a practice to keep a herd of 
about forty head, and always dealt in stock, giving this latter branch 
of his business special attention after he retired from the farm to Huntley 
in 1884. In order to properly handle his stock, he built a large barn 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 677 

for it at Huntley. His stock business is now owned by his son, Edward. 

On February 28, 1867, Patrick Keating was married to Margaret 
A. Harmon at Woodstock. She is a daughter of Michael and Ann 
(Quinn) Harmon, both of whom were born in Kings County, Ireland, 
but came to the United States in 1840, and located in Seneca Township, 
two miles west of Woodstock, where she died in 1902, aged eighty-seven 
years, he surviving her for four years, passing away at the age of ninety 
years. 

Mr. and Mrs. Keating became the parents of the following children: 
William, who had spent some years at Wallace, Idaho, entered the ser- 
vice of the Knights of Columbus organization for work in France during 
the World War; Edward, who is in a real-estate and stock business at 
Huntley; Thomas, who is a resident of Chicago; Bernard, who is with 
his brother Edward; Michael, who was a veteran of the Spanish- American 
War, died July 6, 1915; Elizabeth, who is now living with her parents, 
was for some years a public school teacher, and for three years was 
thus engaged at Huntley; Mary, who was a public school teacher in 
McHenry County and the Elgin High School, is now engaged in War 
Savings branch of the United States Treasury at Chicago; James, who 
is engaged in life insurance work, is at home; and Ann, who was a court 
stenographer at Chicago for some years, is now Mrs. Harold Morton 
of Yonkers, N. Y. All of the family belong to St. Mary's Catholic church 
of Huntley. 

Mrs. Keating is one of the most intelligent ladies of McHenry 
County, and much of her husband's remarkable success is due to her 
foresight and business acumen. Warm hearted and impulsive, she is 
quick to act and prompt to respond to any call upon her sympathies, 
and during the late war was very energetic in forwarding the cause in 
her neighborhood. 



JOHN T. KELAHAN. 



John T. Kelahan, postmaster of Algonquin, is one of the extensive 
realty dealers specializing on farm lands. He was born June 16, 1862, 
a son of Thomas and Mary (Cunningham) Kelahan, who had eight 
children, seven of whom now survive. Thomas Kelahan was born in 
the state of New York, and originally was a farmer, but later became 
a merchant and was engaged in that line of business when he died, 
September 14, 1875. His wife died February 19, 1918. 



678 HISTORY OF MclIENRY COUNTY 

John T. Kelahan attended the common and high schools, and was 

reared on a farm. He remained with his parents until the death of his 
father, and then assumed the responsibilities of conducting the farm. 
Later he became associated with the Borden Company at Algonquin, 
and was so connected for fifteen years, the last year being superintendent. 
Upon his appointment as postmaster of Algonquin, March 3, 1915, by 
President Wilson, he resigned from his firm, hut in addition to dis- 
charging the duties of his position, he deals in farm lands upon an 
extensive scale. 

In 1908 Mr. Kelahan was married to Martha Doyle, a daughter of 
Thomas Doyle, and they have three children, namely: John T., Jr., 
Russell J., and Thomas R. The family are all members of the Catholic 
church. In polities Mr. Kelahan is a Democrat. His fraternal connec- 
tions are with the Moden Woodmen of America. His administration 
of the affairs of the post office is such as to commend him to the general 
public, while personally he has many warm friends not only in McHenry 
County, but Chicago as well, being very well known in both sections 
of the state. He was mayor of Algonquin for six years, from 1907 to 
1913, and during his term of office brought about many improvements, 
one of the most important being the city sewerage system. Mr. Kelahan 
served for four years as postmaster of Algonquin under President (inner 
Cleveland's last administration. 



ABNER W. KELLEY. 



Abner W. Kclley, now deceased, was one of the prominent men of 
McHenry County, and long a resident of Marengo, and he was born 
in Canada Jul}' 26, 1859, and died December 6, 1918. When he was 
three years old he was brought to Marengo, and was here reared. 
He learned the trade of a machinist, and worked at it all of his life, 
principally in McHenry County, although he spent a year in Virginia 
engaged in farming. Returning to Marengo, he resumed his business 
of handling Ford cars, in which he had been engaged before moving 
South, and he had the record of running the first Ford in McHenry 
County, having bought it in 1904. Mr. Kelley bought the first two 
Fords in the county, driving them from Kalamazoo to Marengo, and 
from that time on continued to handle them. In connection with his 
agency he conducted a garage and a machine shop established by his 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 679 

father in 1872. He and his brother built a new garage 80 x 150 feet, 
with an ample repair department, and a fine display window, there 
being none better in the county, and he had just arranged matters satis- 
factorily so as to take things more leisurely when death claimed him. 
Associated with him in the garage business were his two sons, who have 
served in the World War. Mr. Kelley was a Republican, and had 
served on County Committees as well as being interested in securing 
the well being and progress of his community, serving several terms as 
alderman. Mr. Kelley was an elder in the Presbyterian church. 

On May 14, 1888, Mr. Kelley was married to Caroline Kimball, 
born in Massachusetts, but reared at Elgin, 111. Her father was a hard- 
ware merchant, and one of the oldest business men of Elgin. Mr. and 
Mrs. Kelley were the parents of the following children: Pauline, who 
married R. S. Fidler of Aurora, 111.; Charles, Joy and Benjamin, who 
are conducting the garage business formerly owned by their father; 
Fred, who is attending Lake Forest College, was also in the service 
during the World War; Theodore, who is also at Lake Forest College; 
Abner, who is attending Beloit College; and Caroline, who is at home. 
Charles Kelley served in the Second Division, Army of Occupation, 
having crossed to France in December, 1917, and was a hospital supply 
driver. Joy Kelley served in France in automobile repair work. 

On December 6, 1918, Mr. Kelley was returning from Chicago with 
a car, when he was taken with heart failure and was found near Elgin 
bv other autoists in his car. dead at the wheel. 



JOHN T. KELLEY. 



John T. Kelley, ex-mayor of Huntley, vice president of the Huntley 
State Bank, and grain merchant, is numbered among the most repre- 
sentative men of McHenry County. He was born December 19, 1867, 
a son of John G. and Sarah (Coyne) Kelley, and grandson of James 
Coyne. 

John G. Kelley was born in Ireland, and after his father's death, 
which occurred when he was thirteen years old, he was brought to the 
United States by his mother. He and a brother, Thomas, were engaged 
in an implement business at Chicago, later living at St. Charles, and 
Crystal Lake, 111., and finally coming to Huntley in 1862, where he 
was engaged in operating a blacksmith shop until 1885. In that year 



fiMi HISTORY OF McHENBY COUNTY 

he sold his shop and continued to supervise his extensive farming inter- 
ests until his death which occurred January 7. 1915. He and his wife 
were devout members of the Catholic church. 

John T. Kelley attended the public schools and the Drew Business 
College of Elgin, 111., being graduated from the latter March 16, 1886. 
When he was fourteen years old he entered the employ of W. G. Sawyer 
& Co., and remained with this concern for twelve years, and then 
bought a half interest in it, and when Mr. Sawyer died March 15, 1912, 
he purchased his interest from the estate, and continued the business 
alone, under his own name for three years, when he took in Harry 
Hilbert as a partner. The firm of Kelley & Hilbert handled flour, 
feed, grain and coal, and did a large business, amounting to $60,000 
annually. 

Mr. Kelley is now the president of the Huntley Farmers Supply 
Company, organized September 1, 1918, and owns a number of shares 
in the same. His son is treasurer, and Mr. Hilbert acts as secretary. 
The business has a capital of $30,000, and an extensive business is 
eairied on in coal, grain, flour, feed, seeds, etc. 

Mr. Kelley also owns 500 acres of choice farm land in Grafton Town- 
ship. When the Huntley State Bank was organized, Mr. Kelley was 
made a director, and in 1916, he was elected vice president. Very 
prominent locally, Mr. Kelley has served as postmaster, village clerk, 
township trustee, school director, town clerk and mayor of Huntley, 
and is now secretary of the school board. 

In 1893 Mr. Kelley was married to Miss Man - Connor, a daughter 
of Jeremiah Connor of Kane County. Mr. and Mrs. Kelley have the 
following children: Marie, who is Mrs. Raymond J. Donohue of Kane 
County; Gordon J., who is in business with his father; Margaret and 
Raymond J., who are at home. Mr. Kelley belongs to the Modern 
Woodmen of America. Mr. and Mrs. Kelley and family are devout 
members of the Catholic church. 



WILLIAM KERR. 
Page 138. 

WILLIS JAMES KITTLE. 

Willis James Kittle, one of the substantial farmers of Nunda Town- 
ship, owns a finely-improved farm on sections 11, 12 and 15 of this town- 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 681 

ship. He was born in Nunda Township, October 3, 1856, a son of James 
and Jane Isabella (Mosgrave) Kittle, who spent the greater part of 
their lives in Nunda Township, where they were engaged in farming. 
The maternal grandfather of Willis James Kittle, settled on the present 
farm of the latter, in 1844, buying a large part of it from the government. 

Growing up in his native township, Willis James Kittle attended 
its common schools, and then studied for two terms at the normal school 
at Valparaiso, Ind. Early taught to make himself useful on the farm, 
he has spent the greater part of his life in agricultural pursuits, although 
earlier in life he was also engaged in school-teaching, and had some 
practical experience in mercantile work, in which he was engaged for 
several years commencing with 1893, during the period of the World's 
Fair at Chicago. He is a strong Republican, and during 1881, served 
as township collector, and has been on the school board, and also as a 
village trustee. The Methodist Episcopal church holds his member- 
ship, and he is highly regarded in the local congregation. 

Mr. Kittle was married (first) at Ringwood, 111., to Rose L. Nickle, 
who was born at Ringwood, September 5, 1855, and they had one son, 
Roy L. Kittle, who died October 30, 1918. After the death of his first 
wife, Mr. Kittle was married (second), at Crystal Lake, 111., to Miss 
Laura A. Paine, who was born at Crystal Lake, July 31, 1876. Mr. and 
Mrs. Kittle have one son, James Lewis Kittle, who was born April 11, 
1913. The family residence is at Crystal Lake, although Mr. Kittle 
still owns and operates his farm. Few men stand any higher in public 
esteem than he, and he deserves the place he occupies in his community 
for he has won it through personal effort and real merit. 



LENTILLES KIZER. 



Lentilles Kizer, a retired farmer of Harvard, belongs to the old and 
honored Kizer family of McHenry County, and was born on the farm 
his father secured from the government, July 12, 1856. He is a son 
of Warren Kizer, one of four brothers, Morgan, Jacob, Warren and Morris 
Kizer, who came to McHenry County in 1844. Warren Kizer's farm 
joined that of Jacob on the south, while the farm Morris secured was 
across the road, so the three brothers had an undivided piece of land. 
Morgan Kizer was about three-quarters of a mile away from the others. 
The latter left the county about 1861, and died at Oregon, 111. Morris 



6S2 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

sold his farm before the outbreak of the Civil War, but bought another 
one in Chemung Township, where he died, and his property was later 
sold and his family is scattered. 

Warren Kizer was married in New York state to Sophronia Brees, 
and at once came West. They had but the one child, who was born 
in a log house, but about 1859, a new residence was built, and in it he 
died August 5, 1868. For some years prior to his demise he was in 
poor health, and his wife did fine sewing and trimmed hats, gaining a 
widespread reputation for the quality of her work. For several years 
he and Warren were in partnership with the Waite brothers and they 
conducted a general store at the State Line Corners, but after the 
establishment of the village of Sharon, on account of the building of the 
Chicago & Northwestern Railroad, the trade was drawn away from 
that region, the business w 7 as abandoned, and Mr. Kizer returned to 
his farm in 1860. In young manhood he taught school, and was the first 
teacher at the Big Foot school, five miles from home, and he walked 
back and forth, receiving only $12 and his board per month, for his 
services. When he went for his certificate, he was asked if he could 
make a quill pen, and when he replied that he could, he was told to write 
out a certificate, and it was at once signed, the one question and answer 
constituting the only examination given him. The little schoolhouse 
in which he first taught was built of cobblestones, and he also taught in 
his home district. All four brothers were Republicans after the formation 
of that party. Warren Kizer's wife survived him until April 23, 1902. 
Their marriage certificate, still in the possession of his son, is dated 
Fairport, N. Y., April 28, 1844, and shows that he was born in Lucerne 
County, Pa., June 14, 1816, and she in Chemung County, X. Y., 
February 4, 1818. 

Lentilles Kizer was twelve years old when his father died, and the 
next four years were spent by him in attending school and in helping 
his mother. When he was sixteen years old, he began operating the 
farm, which he owns, leaving it in 1907, to locate at Harvard, although 
he still supervises the work of the farm, keeping it well improved, and 
he has a very fine farm. His residence, located on an elevation, is the 
original house lived in by his father, but he has practically rebuilt it, 
and made it very modern. Mr. Kizer is a Republican. 

On May 27, 1880, Mr. Kizer was married to Lettie E. Burton, 
a daughter of Billings and Harriet (Sweasey) Burton, born on the Burton 
farm, April 16, 1860. Mr. and Mrs. Kizer have no children. 



HISTORY OF McHEXRY COUNTY 683 

ROLLAND C. KIZER. 

Rolland C. Kizer, who owns one of the best farms in Chemung 
Township, is located eight miles northwest of Harvard and three miles 
east of Sharon, and was born on this farm October 17, 1853, a son of 
Jacob and Sarah (Smith) Kizer, natives of Pennsylvania, where they 
were married. The paternal grandfather, Samuel Kizer, accompanied 
Jacob Kizer when he journeyed overland to Ohio, and with them were 
two brothers of the latter, Warren and Marius. They came on to 
McHenry County, the younger men all securing government land, 
which they developed and spent the remainder of their lives in this 
vicinity. The old grandfather lived with Jacob Kizer until his death 
which occurred at the age of ninety-three years. A son of Warren 
Kizer owns his father's homestead which joins the one of Jacob Kizer, 
and on it Warren Kizer died at the age of seventy years. His wife 
was also a Pennsylvanian. Marius had a farm opposite to the one of 
Warren, but he later sold it and went to Rock Island County, 111., and 
there died, his family remaining there also. When the Chicago & 
Northwestern Railroad was built, all the brothers helped in the con- 
struction work, and they were among the organizers of the township. 
Warren served the township as assessor for years. 

Jacob Kizer, in partnership with John A. and William A. Waite, 
conducted a general store at the State Line Corners, and in addition 
to the store and post office there was a blacksmith shop and a few houses, 
the nucleus of a village, but with the building of the railroad and the 
establishment of Sharon, business drifted to the new town, and Jacob 
Kizer returned to his farm which he conducted for twenty-five years, 
but then retired. He was born December 10, 1815, and died February 
12, 1896. His wife was born November 24, 1816, and died October 21, 
1897. They were married November 11, 1841. Their children were 
as follows: Laura M., who married Edward V. Phelps, a banker of 
Harvard; Ann E., who was born July 24, 1846, died in the cholera 
epidemic of 1870; Hamilton, who was the first of the children born in 
Illinois, his birth occurring June 11, 1847, lives at Harvard; Edward S., 
who was a creamery man of Sherland, 111., died February 2, 1897; R. C, 
who is mentioned below; Lydia R., who married Robert Brown of 
Sharon, Wis., a farmer, died December 18, 1909; and Frank, who is 
engaged in a creamery business of Wapaca, Wis., left McHenry County 
in young manhood. 

Jacob Kizer was one of the active Republicans of his township, but 



684 BISTORT OP McHENRY COUNTY 

never could he induced to accept of public honors. During the early 
days he was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church at State Line 
Corners, but later connected himself with the Cary Church at Sharon, 
and died firm in its faith. He was a man who held the respect of his 
neighbors and deserved it for he was upright, hard working, thrifty, 
a good citizen and reliable man. 

Rolland C. Kizer has added to his father's homestead until he now 
has 140 acres. His house was erected by his father, but he has prac- 
tically re-built it. He has also built a barn, silo and made numerous 
other improvements. For years he has devoted himself to dairying 
and keeps from seventeen to twenty cows of the Holstein strain. Like 
his father Mr. Kizer is a strong Republican. 

On March 10, 1886, Mr. Kizer was married to Frances Hawver, 
a daughter of Charles Hawver, born and reared at Big Fork, Chemung 
Township. Mrs. Kizer died February 8, 1888. Mr. Kizer has not 
re-married. He has a splendid tenant on his farm. In young manhood, 
Mr. Kizer united with the Methodist Episcopal church at Sherland, 
and later transferred to the one at Sharon. He is a Blue Lodge Mason, 
being affiliated with the lodge at Sharon. Like his father he enjoys 
the confidence of all who know him, the county owes him and his much 
for the representatives of his name have borne an important part in 
the development of this part of the state. 



CLAYTON W. KLONTZ, M. D. 

Clayton W. Klontz, M. D., one of the prominent members of the 
medical profession of McHenry County, is engaged in practice at Rich- 
mond, where he located August 1, 1917. He was born in Illinois, 
April 25, 1890, a son of Isaac and Marguerite (Folgate) Klontz, who 
were the parents of five children, four of whom survive. Isaac Klontz 
was born in Ohio, but came to Illinois when two years old. He later 
engaged in farming continuing in this line until his death, in 1908. An 
excellent farmer and good business man he was very successful, and 
stood well in his home community. 

Doctor Klontz attended the grade and high schools of Freeport, 111., 
and the University of Illinois for three years, taking a science course, and 
later became a student of the Northwestern University, from which 
he was graduated in 1916. For eighteen months thereafter he was 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 685 

connected with St. Anthony's Hospital at Chicago, where he gained a 
very valuable experience. Since coining to Richmond he has won the 
approval of his fellow practitioners and the favor of the public, by his 
knowledge of his profession and his skillful treatment of his cases. He 
is a member of the McHcnry County Medical Society. A man of 
strong convictions he prefers to vote according to his own views instead 
of binding himself down by party ties. 

Doctor Klontz was married to Miss Lula M. Swanson, a daughter 
of Herman and Mary (Wrightson) Swanson of Lewiston, Mich. Both 
Doctor and Mrs. Klontz are protestants in religious faith. 



GARDNER A. KNAPP. 



Gardner A. Knapp, superintendent of the County farm at Hartland, 
has a practical knowledge of farming that particularly fits him for his 
present position which he has held since 1913. He was born on a farm 
in Iowa, April 13, 1868, one of the nine children of Ebenezer R. and 
Emily (Thompson) Knapp. Ebenezer Knapp was born in New York, 
from whence he came West as far as Ohio, and after a stop in that state, 
to McHenry County, in 1855, and locating at Woodstock, carried on a 
wagon-making business until 1871. In the later year he moved to 
Seneca Township, and for some years was engaged in farming. He 
died January 10, 1905. During the Civil War he served in Company G, 
Seventeenth Illinois Cavalry. His wife survives. 

Gardner A. Knapp was reared in McHenry County and attended 
its schools. He has alternated farming and working at his trade as a 
carpenter, but since 1913, he has devoted his time and attention to 
the care of the inmates of the county home. This home was built 
in 1884, and opened on December 10 of that year. At present there are 
thirty-eight inmates. The farm comprises 109 acres of land, and the 
buildings are supplied with modern conveniences. 

On February 16, 1898, Mr. Knapp was married to Miss Marian 
E. Barrows, a sketch of her family appearing elsewhere in this work. 
Mr. and Mrs. Knapp have the following children: Paul E., who was born 
January 21, 1900; Mabel, who was born June 24, 1908; Russell, who was 
born December 24, 1911; Gerald, who died at the age of one month, and 
two who died in infancy. The family attend the Methodist Episcopal 
church. In politics Mr. Knapp is a Republican, and he has served as a 



686 HISTORY OF McHENBY COUNTY 

justice of the peace and town collector. Under his wise and judicious 
management the poor of the county receive attention and at the same 
time are kindly led to till their farm so as to provide in some measure 
for their food supply. Mr. Knapp is a Royal-Arch and Shriner Mason, 
and he also belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America. 



MICHAEL KNOX. 



Michael Knox, a farmer of Nunda Township, who deserves more 
than passing mention in a work of this character, belongs to one of the 
old families of McHenry County. He was born in this county, January 
21, 1864, a son of John Knox, who was born in Ireland in 1819, and died 
in 1887. 

John Knox came to the United States in young manhood, and soon 
after his arrival, located in McHenry County, where he became a farmer. 
He was married to Mary Noonan, born in Ireland, who was brought 
to the United States by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Michael Noonan, 
and they became early settlers of McHenry County. John Knox and 
his wife had the following children: Ella Bolger; Anna Doherty; 
Elizabeth, who is Mrs. M. Conway; Mary; Alice; John; Michael, all of 
whom are living; and Thomas, Edward and two infant daughters, who 
are deceased. In politics John Knox was an independent Democrat. 
Buying 160 acres of land, he farmed it until his death, and was a very 
successful man. 

Michael Knox attended the district schools, and grew up on the 
farm. With the exception of two years spent in Chicago, Mr. Knox 
has always lived in McHenry County. For three years he rented a 
farm, and then bought 160 acres on section 15, Nunda Township, on 
which he has since carried on general farming and dairying with gratify- 
ing results. 

In 1895 Mr. Knox was married to Mary A. Doherty, born in Nunda 
Township, a daughter of Michael and Mary (Knox) Doherty, natives 
of Ireland. Mr. and Mrs. Knox have the following children: Florence, 
who is a teacher; Francis; Edward, who served on the U. S. S. Massa- 
chusetts; Harold T.; Robert; Vernon; Mabel and Marie, who are living; 
and Ellen, who is deceased. Mr. Knox is an independent Democrat. 
During the more than half a century Mr. Knox has lived in McHenry 
County, he has borne his part in its development. 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 687 

FRANK KREUTZER. 

Frank Kreutzer, one of the successful men of McHenry County, 
resides in Grafton Township, three miles north of Huntley, where he 
owns a valuable farm. He was born in Bavaria, Germany, February 
24, 1854, a son of John and Mary Ann Kreutzer, a sketch of whom is 
to be found elsewhere in this work. Frank Kreutzer was twelve years 
old when the family came to the United States, and thirteen, when settle- 
ment was made in McHenry County. When John Kreutzer sold the 
homestead to his sons, Paul and John, Frank Kreutzer began working 
for John Coil of Kane County, and after one year on his farm, spent two 
years on the farm of William A. Boies, receiving $18 per month for the 
first year, and $23 for the second. During these three years he was able 
to save $300, and with the $900 he received from his father, he had 
enough money to go into partnership, in 1878, with his brother George 
and buy his present farm of 160 acres, all of which was open prairie, 
covered with stones. They paid $25 per acre for this farm, and at that 
time could have bought an improved farm for $35 per acre. They each 
paid $1,000, and went into debt for $3,000, paying ten percent interest 
for two years, when they were able to negotiate a loan at six percent. 
Still later, Frank Kreutzer bought his brother's share. 

There were so many stones on the farm, many of them of considerable 
size that Mr. Kreutzer decided to make use of them, and utilized them 
in the erection of his buildings, in this way securing a durable and cheap 
material. It took an almost unending amount of hard work to clear 
and develop the land, and it was not until 1912 that he paid off his debt 
in full. Prices were very low during the early days, milk selling for 
sixty cents per can, from which the freight of seventeen cents had to be 
subtracted. In fact for some years he made nothing from his herd, but 
later on he changed his grade of cattle, and improved the quality and 
increased the volume of his production. During President McKinley's 
administration land in the rural regions began to increase, prices rose 
for farm products and he was able to make substantial payments on 
his debt, and thus reduced his interest. Mr. Kreutzer has continued 
to improve his property, and has redeemed about sixty acres of ponds 
and swamp land by proper drainage. His residence and other build- 
ings are located on an elevation overlooking not only his own farm, but 
an area of several miles in extent, and his entire premises show that they 
are carefully superintended by one who understands his business and 
takes a pride in having everything just right. His barn is 36x112 feet, 



<;>- HISTORY OP McHENRY COUNTY 

am! 35 feel in height, with full basement, and he has room for over 
fifty head of cattle in big box stalls. He lias made milk his leading 
feature, and milks forty-five head, feeding all the crop he raises to his 
stock. As his soil is kept in prime condition, his crops are large. He 
has a large silo, and other improvements, and his interests are centered 
in his farm. 

In 1880, when he was twenty-three years old, Mr. Kreutzer was 
married to Mary M. Pobb, born in Illinois, her parents being residents 
of Buffalo Grove, Lake County, 111. Mr. and Mrs. Kreutzer became 
the parents of the following children: John; Rosa, who married Andrew 
Schmidt of Huntley, a mason by trade; Anna, who is at home; Lizzie, 
who married Joseph Zelover, is now at home, her husband having died 
in November, 1918; Andrew; Willie, who spent six months at Camp 
Hancock, during the Great War, expected to be sent to France, hut 
did not receive orders on account of the signing of the Armistice; and 
Leo, who is on the farm, as are all of the other sons. Mr. Kreutzer 
and his family belong to St. Mary's Catholic church of Huntley. He 
is one of the strongest kind of Republicans, and firmly believes that only 
under Republican administration can this country develop a healthy 
prosperity, pointing out with accuracy the hard times which have always 
followed the return of Democrats to power. His information on this 
subject shows that he has studied the history of his adopted country, 
and his willingness to give these facts, proves his fearlessness in backing 
his beliefs. 



PAUL KREUTZER. 



Paul Kreutzer, a director of the State Bank of Huntley, and an exten- 
sive farmer of Grafton Township, is one of the most substantial men of 
this region, and resides at Huntley. He was director of the Chicago, 
Waukegan & Fox Lake Traction Company during the years 1912 and 
1913, in which he lost several thousand dollars. Mr. Kreutzer was born 
in Bavaria, Germany, November 22, 1848, but since coming to this 
country, has imbibed the true spirit of his adopted land, and is thoroughly 
Americanized in thought and act. He is a son of John and Mary Ann 
Kreutzer, farming people. 

In 1866 John Kreutzer came to the United States, and spent a year 
at Springfield, 111., coming thence to McIIenry County, locating on the 
farm still owned by his son, Paul, which contained 211 acres, forty acres 
of which were covered with timber, and the remainder is in prairie, to 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 689 

which Paul Kreutzcr has since added until he now has 311 acres, his 
last purchase of twenty-two acres costing him $225 per acre, which same 
land was offered to him forty years ago at $75. Mr. Kreutzer has built 
a new set of buildings and made many other improvements, having one 
of the best rural properties in his neighborhood. This farm lies mainly 
in Kane County, just across the county line. Mr. Kreutzer has always 
carried on dairying, milking from sixty-five to seventy cows, but is now 
having a smaller herd as he has rented a portion of his property. In 
addition to his barns, he has two silos, and does all of his work according 
to modern methods. At one time he was associated in the operation of 
a local creamery. While he is a Democrat, Mr. Kreutzer is not an office 
seeker. 

When he was twenty-seven years old, he was married to Kunigunda 
Sporlein, at Buffalo Grove, 111., where she was born, a daughter of 
Christ Sporlein, whose father had secured land from the government 
during the early forties, and this farm is still owned by George Sporlein, 
a brother of Mrs. Kreutzer. Mr. and Mrs. Kreutzer became the parents 
of the following children: Walburgo, who married a Mr. Daniel Crim- 
mins, and died six months later at the age of twenty-four years; Charley, 
who is at home; and Joseph, who is also at home. Joseph Kreutzer 
registered for service under the first draft and was expecting to be 
called into the service when the Armistice was signed. Mr. Kreutzer 
is an honest man and looks it. The soul of sincerity, he lives up to his 
word and expects others to be as honest as he. Strong in his con- 
victions, he does not lack the courage of them, nor does he fear to give 
expression to his opinions. Powerful in physique, he has always been 
able and willing to do two men's work, and his industry and energy 
have resulted in a much-deserved prosperity. During the late war Mr. 
Kreutzer was one of the men of German birth who proved their loyalty 
to the United States in countless ways, and is justly numbered among 
the very desirable citizens of the county. His methods of farming are 
such as to win approval from his associates, and many of them are 
adopted by those who appreciate their value and desire to bring about 
similar results to the ones attained by him. He is a member of the 
Catholic church at Huntley. 



JOHN P. KROEGER. 



John P. Kroeger, a director of the United State Bank of Crystal 
Lake and proprietor of the garage at Crystal Lake that bears his name, 



690 HISTORY OK McHENRY COUNTY 

is also agent for the Ford cars. He was born in Germany, .July 24, 18G2, 
a son of Joseph and Mary (Roggensack) Kroeger, who had nine children, 
three of whom survive. Joseph Kroeger was born in Germany. Be 
died in this country in 1893, having been a farmer all his life. 

John P. Kroeger was reared on his father's farm, and attended the 
public schools of his native land. In 1883, he came to the United 
States and located at Crystal Lake, and worked at various trades. 
In 1893 he was appointed postmaster at Crystal Lake, and at same time 
embarked in a mercantile business which he recently sold. In February, 
1914, he branched out, becoming agent for the Ford cars, and in 1918 
completed his present modern garage at a cost of ,$18,000, since which 
time he has conducted a large service station. He has a partner in the 
automobile business, operating under the name of Kroeger & Rauhut, 
the firm having been established in 1917. Since its re-organization, 
Mr. Kroeger has been a director of the United State Bank of Crystal 
Lake. 

In 1887, Mr. Kroeger was united in marriage with Miss Rika Berg, 
a daughter of John Berg, who was born in Germany. Mr. and Mrs. 
Kroeger became the parents of five children, namely: William E. ; 
Mary, who died September 9, 1916; Paul F. ; and Hulda and Edith 
(twins) who are at home. The family belong to the Lutheran church. 
Mr. Kroeger is a Republican. He is one of the best business men at 
Crystal Lake, and is held in high respect by all who know him. 



CHARLES KRUSE. 



Charles Kruse, one of the prominent business men of Richmond, 
owns and operates one of the most prosperous hardware stores in Mc- 
Henry County. He was born at West Chicago, 111., December 21, 
1872, one of the nine children of John and Sophia (Hilgendorf) Kruse. 
For many years John Kruse was section foreman for the Northwestern 
Railroad, and he is still living, but his wife died November 6, 1919. 

Charles Kruse attended the public schools of his locality and learned 
the tinner's trade, following it for some time, and he still has a well- 
equipped tinning and plumbing shop in connection with his present busi- 
ness. For some years he continued to be a resident of West Chicago, but 
in 1898 moved to Richmond, and erected his present store building in 
1905, at a cost of $12,000. In normal times he carries a stock ranging 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 691 

from $15,000 to $20,000. He usually has four people in his employ. 
In January, 1920, he incorporated his business as the Kruse Hardware 
Company, under which name he is now operating. In addition to his 
business interests at Richmond, Mr. Kruse owns 115 acres of land in 
Richmond Township, that is very valuable, a 125-acre farm in Randall 
Township, Kenosha County, Wis., and considerable realty at Richmond, 
he being one of the wealthiest men of his community. 

In 1898 Mr. Kruse was married to Miss Anna Mordhorst, a daughter 
of John Mordhorst, a prominent farmer of Kane County, 111. Mr. 
and Mrs. Kruse have had the following children: Helen S., who is the 
wife of Richard G. Richardson; Charles E., who is attending the Uni- 
versity of Illinois; Anna Bernice, who died April 1, 1920; and John 
Wallace, who is at home. 

In politics Mr. Kruse is a Republican. He and his family belong 
to the Lutheran church, but attend the Methodist Episcopal church 
to which he contributes. His many and varied interests keep him fully 
occupied, but he does not neglect his civic duties, and can always be 
relied upon to give an instant and effective support to all measures 
which he believes will bring about an improvement in existing con- 
ditions. He is vice-president of the State Bank of Richmond, a director 
of the Community High School of Richmond and Burton Townships, 
and president of the Business Men's Association. 



EDWARD FRED KUECKER. 

Edward Fred Kuecker, supervisor of Seneca Township, and one of 
the representative men of McHenry County, is successfully engaged 
in farming, four miles northeast of Marengo, and eight miles southwest 
of Woodstock. He was born in Du Page County, 111., February 28, 
1880, a son of Richard and Charlotte (Winkelman) Kuecker, both of 
whom were born in Hanover, Germany, where they were married. Soon 
after their marriage, in 1869, they came to the United States to join 
two of his sisters who had located in Du Page County, 111. In 1910, he 
retired, and moved to Marengo where he is now living, taking life easily. 
Richard Kuecker owns one of the very valuable farms of McHenry 
County, having come to it in 1885. It is located in Coral Township, 
one mile south of the village of Coral. It was an undeveloped tract 
of land when he bought it, and much hard work was required to bring 



692 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

it into its present fine state, bul that he was able fco perform, and few 
men of the vicinity deserve greater credit for their labor than he. In 
1016 his property was visited by a devastating fire, and all of the build- 
ings were utterly destroyed, not a gate being left untouched. He 
immediately went to work and rebuilt them all, making them thor- 
oughly modern and much better than they were originally. In addition 
to having the best of buildings, fencing and equipment, Mf\ Kuecker 
has thoroughly drained his land, and holds it at a high figure. His 
children tire as follows: Henry, who is in the employ of the Borden 
Company at Marengo; William, who is a farmer of Riley Township; 
Edward F., whose name heads this review; Fred, who is a farmer .of Coral 
Township; Richard, who lives on the old homestead, suffered the loss 
of several horses, grain, hay, tools, etc., at the time of the fire; George, 
who lives at Marengo; Sophia, who is Mrs. August Kloszeski of Coral 
Township; Emma, who is Mrs. Albert Winakelmann of Elgin, 111.; 
Dorothy, who is Mrs. Monte Standiford of Belvidere, 111.; Alvina, who 
lives at Warsaw. Ind.; and Matilda, who is the wife of Frank Miller, an 
auctioneer of Marengo. 

Edward F. Kuecker assisted his father to clear off the homestead, 
and remained at home until his marriage, which occurred November 
19, 1902, when he was twenty-two years old, at which time he was 
united with Sophia Mueller, a daughter of J. D. Mueller, now deceased, 
but late of Seneca Township, his old farm now being conducted by 
his two sons, Rudolph and William. Mrs. Kuecker was born at St. 
Louis, Mo., and was only four years old when she was brought to Seneca 
Township. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kuecker have five children, namely: Ahin, Edwin, 
Wilhelmiua arcl Ellen, living, and Lydia, deceased. 

After marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Kuecker rented land in Marengo 
Township for four years, and then bought eighty acres. On it Mr. 
Kuecker has erected a silo and outbuildings, and has added twenty-four 
acres to his original purchase, for which he paid $100 per acre. Forty 
acres adjacent to a creek, formerly very low land, have been drained, 
and the whole farm today is in a high state of cultivation. Starting 
in a small way, Mr. Kuecker has branched out into a breeder of fine 
Holstein cattle, of which he has a magnificent herd, all pure bred, and 
he has also a widespread reputation as a successful breeder of White 
Leghorn chickens. 

A stalwart Republican, Mr. Kuecker was highway commissioner 



HISTORY OF McHENKY COUNTY 693 

for four years prior to 1915, and in that year was elected supervisor, 
and has since been re-elected. He is a member of the local school 
board and one of the three directors comprising the McHenry County 
High School Board, of which he is president, becoming a member of 
the board which came into existence under the new law, which provides 
the privilege of high school students attending the school most con- 
venient to their place of residence, regardless of townships or district 
lines, the county bearing the tuition expense. Mr. Kuecker belongs 
to Zion Lutheran church at Marengo, and has long been very active 
as a member of its choir, and he is also president of the Marengo Band 
Association, which he helped to organize. A born musician, Mr. Kuecker 
has worked hard to cultivate an appreciation of good musfc, and his efforts 
are bearing fruit. 



CLAUDE C. LACE. 



Claude C. Lace, junior member of the firm of Lace & Reimer, pro- 
prietors of the Algonquin Garage, is one of the leading young business 
men of Algonquin. He was born at New Milford, 111., January 21, 1S90, 
the only child of Thomas and Hattie (Cipperly) Lace. Thomas Lace 
was formerly one of the prosperous farmers near Rockford, 111., but is 
now residing at Rockford. 

Claude C. Lace was reared at Rockford, and attended its common 
and high schools. For a time he was engaged in assisting his father on 
the farm, after he had completed his studies, and then he began learning 
the trade of a machinist. Completing his apprenticeship at this trade, 
he put it to practical use, and December 9, 1914, formed his present 
association. The firm carries a stock valued at $7,000, and in addition 
to operating a general garage and machine shop, they conduct a Goodyear 
service station, and do a very large business in all lines. 

In 1916 Mr. Lace was united in marriage with Miss Minnie Werneke, 
a daughter of William Werneke, and a member of one of the pioneer 
families of Algonquin. She died December 31, 1918, leaving one child, 
Ruth M. Lace. 

In politics, Mr. Lace is a Republican. He is one of the alert young 
men of the county, and deserves the prosperity which is attending him, 
for he has worked hard and intelligently to bring it about. 



G94 HISTORY OP McIIKXRY COUNTY 

JAMES C LADD. 

James C. Ladd, one of the retired fanners and business men of 
Ring wood, has been active in affairs of McHenry County, and Clark 
County, Iowa. Ho was born one mile north of Ringwood, August 
12, 1847, a son of Wesley Ladd, who died March 25, 1897. His firsl 
wife, whose maiden name was Caroline Colburn, died October 1st, 1S53, 
having borne him two children, namely: .James ('. and Frederica. 
The daughter remained with her father, and died unmarried, September 
4, 1906, in the family home at Ringwood, to which her father moved in 
1882, and which he had owned for fifty years. By his second marriage 
with Plielie Haley, Wesley Ladd had the following children: Amelia, 
who is Mrs. E. H. Carter, of Jefferson, Iowa; Nellie C, who is Mrs. 
< harles M. Prickett, of Elizabeth, Colo., was a teacher until her marriage; 
Carrie, who is Mrs. Willard E. Smith, of Ringwood; Elma, who died 
in 1881; anil Mary A., who married Oliver Southwick, a merchant of 
Williams Bay, Wis. Wesley Ladd owned 570 acres of land near Ring- 
wood, at one time being one of the most extensive farmers of this region. 
In addition to farming, he dealt in grain and pork upon a large scale, 
especially during the Civil War, and was one of the leading men of 
McHenry County. 

.lames C. Ladd remained with his father until his marriage, which 
occurred February 7, 1877, when he was united to Elizabeth Harrison, 
a daughter of Francis and Catherine (Ward) Harrison of Nunda Town- 
ship, to which locality they had come from New York state in 1840, and 
there spent the remainder of their lives. He was born in Yorkshire, 
England, and she in Oneida County, N. Y. Following their marriage 
Mr. and Mrs. Harrison moved to Clinton County, N. Y., and lived 
there until their migration to Illinois. Mr. Harrison died in 1878, aged 
sixty-eight years; and she died in 1902, aged eighty-five years, having 
survived her husband for twenty-four years. Mrs. Ladd was born in 
Nunda Township, February 14, 1854. 

At the time of his marriage, Mr. Ladd rented a farm in McHenry 
County and remained on it for a few years, and then' went to Clark 
County, Iowa, where in 18SG, he bought 280 acres of land, for which he 
paid $3,500. At the death of his father, he returned to McHenry 
County as he was named as one of the executors of the estate, although 
he had become very prominent in Clark County, being one of the three 
county commissioners, who in 1893, erected the courthouse at a cost of 
$50,000, one of the finest ones in the state. It stands in the public 




& $'>&m<t&^/tf. & 



HISTORY OP McHENRY COUNTY 695 

square, and his name, among others, appears on the cornerstone. As 
he realized it would take some time to settle his father's extensive 
affairs, he finally sold his Iowa farm. As a portion of his share of the 
estate, Mr. Ladd received the family residence at Ringwood, where he 
has lived for some years. He has been engaged in stock shipping, and 
owns a 140-acre farm near Ringwood, on which he has made many repairs 
and put in improvements so that it is now a valuable property. For 
two terms Mr. Ladd served as supervisor of McHenry Township. A 
Republican, he cast his first presidential vote for General Grant while 
he was attending the State University at Urbana, 111. Mr. and Mrs. 
Ladd have no children. Since 1885 Mr. Ladd has been a member of 
McHenry Lodge No. 158, A. F. & A. M. Mrs. Ladd is a member of 
the Eastern Star. He is a Universalist and the local society of that 
belief, having no house of worship, holds its meetings at the homes of 
those belonging to it. Both Mr. and Mrs. Ladd are held in the highest 
esteem and have many warm friends both in McHenry and Clark 
counties. 



J,OHN CARL LADWIG. 

It has long been a recognized fact that the agriculturalist occupies 
a very important place in the economic plan of any country, and recent 
events have proven how independent the farmer of the United States 
is of outside influences. If he owns his land he has not only a home 
assured him, but ample food supply, while from the majority of rural 
properties enough fuel can be gathered to provide heat. He can easily 
exchange his produce for clothing, or at a pinch can, as did his ancestors, 
raise cotton and wool. Because of the realization of the fact that the 
fanner is fundamentally back of all industry has brought about a greater 
appreciation of the value of his efforts in the past. One of the men who 
was closely connected with the agricultural development of McHenry 
County was the late John Carl Ladwig, who for years was a farmer 
of Greenwood Township. 

John Carl Ladwig was born in Wentsbangendorf, Pommern, Ger- 
many, March 27, 1847. In 1872 he came to the United States and 
settled at Crystal Lake and for a time was occupied with farming for 
others and then, in 1874, he rented the James Smith farm in Algonquin 
Township. It was not long, however, before he bought a farm of his 
own, comprising 120 acres of land in Greenwood Township, which he 



696 BISTORT OF McHENRY COUNTY 

operated for nine years, or until his death, which occurred on May 25, 
1903. His family sold the farm and moved to Woodstock, where they 
own a comfortable home. 

Ill 1874 he was married to Miss Marie Schlot I mami and they became 
the parents of Louis, Robert, Emma and Augusta. Mrs. Ladwig died 
in INS."). In 1886 Mr. Ladwig was married to Mrs. Zimmerman, and 
they became the parents of the following children: John, who died in 
1907; Curl; Alexander, and Clara. Mr. Ladwig was a hard-working, 
thrifty man, he stood very high in public esteem and was recognized as 
one of the solid men of his community, and one upon whom implicit 
reliance could be placed. His widow and children share in the general 
approbation he won, and are members of a congenial social circle at 
Woodstock. 



JAMES LAKE. 



James Lake, one of the very influential men of Harvard, who is 
interested in some of the most important affairs of the city and county, 
was horn in Walworth County, Wis., eight miles north of Harvard, and 
one mile north of the state line, September 23, 1850, a son of Beardsley 
Lake. The latter was born in New York, a son of Rev. Philip Waldo 
Lake, a minister of the Free Will Baptist church, who came west in 
1839, settling on Big Foot Prairie, where he secured 640 acres of land. 
The next spring, Beardsley Lake's wife and two children joined him. 
Her maiden name was Mary K. Welsh, and she was born in the same 
neighborhood as he. They settled on 320 acres of the land above 
mentioned. 

James Lake was two years old when his mother brought him to this 
farm, and he lived on it until 1876 when he came to Harvard, and two 
years later he bought an interest in the business of Mr. Clark, and 
maintained that connection for three years. He then bought the busi- 
ness owned by A. D. Crum of Walworth. Wis., conducting it for three 
years, when Mr. Crum became his partner. Once more Mr. Lake bought 
Mr. ('rum's interest and continued alone for eight years. At the expira- 
tion of that period he took into partnership, his son-in-law. This busi- 
ness was originally founded by James Lake's uncle, Levi Lake, and has 
been continuously in the Lake family ever since, with the exception 
of the time it was owned by Mr. Crum. Lumber, coal, feed and similar 
commodities are handled, and since 1876 the firm has handled stock, 



HISTORY OF McIIKXRY COUNTY 697 

buying, selling and shipping upon an extensive scale. In connection 
with the stock end of the business, Mr. Lake has owned several farms 
at different times. He is a staunch Republican, and for ten years served 
as supervisor of Chemung Township. The Congregational church 
holds his membership. Mr. Lake is a Knight-Templar Mason. Few 
men are held in higher esteem in McHenry and Walworth counties than 
he, and he deserves a place in a work of this high character. 



JOSEPH I. LANG. 



Joseph I. Lang, now deceased, was one of the distinguished members 
of the McHenry County bar, and at the time of his demise, was residing 
at Richmond. He was born in Ypsilanti, Mich., January 30, 1877, 
one of the six children of Cornelius C. and Jennie (Gunn) Lang, the 
former of whom was engaged in the hardware business for a number 
of years. 

Joseph I. Lang attended the common and high schools of his native 
city, and the law department of the Northwestern University, from 
which he was graduated June 16, 1904. Immediately thereafter he 
opened an office at Richmond, and was engaged in an active practice, 
when his brilliant career was terminated by an automobile accident 
November 20, 1916, when he and Dr. W. H. Streng were killed. 

On October 9, 1901, Mr. Lang was married to Miss Ella L. Knight, 
born January 17, 1880, a daughter of George O. Knight of Providence, 
R. I. Mr. and Mrs. Lang became the parents of one child, Frances 
M., born June 3, 1914, who, with her mother survive Mr. Lang. Mr. 
Lang was a Republican. He belonged to the Catholic Church, while 
his wife is a Baptist, Professionally Mr. Lang belonged to the McHenry 
County Bar Association which he served as secretary and treasurer. 
Fraternally he was a member of the Modern Woodmen of America 
and the Knights of Columbus, and Mrs. Lang belongs to the Royal 
Neighbors. Mr. Lang left behind him an unblemished reputation and 
a name which stands for the highest conception of the ethics of his 
learned profession. 



GEORGE WILLIAM LEMMERS. 

George William Lemmers, abstractor of titles and insurance agent, 
residing at No. 232 North Tryon street, Woodstock, is one of the repre- 



698 HISTORY OK M< HENRY COUNTY 

sentative men of McHenry County. He was born at Woodstock, 

March 1."), 1871, a son of Cornelius Florentius and Lois Delina (Wheeler) 
Lemmers, the former of whom was horn at Rotterdam. Holland, Septem- 
ber 4, 1816, and the latter, at Courtland, X. Y., September IS, 1833. 
He was a carpenter and joiner and settled with his wife at Woodstock, 
in 1851, building the following year, a house on the lot now occupied by 
the residence of his son, George William Lemmers. This house stood 
until 1915, when it was moved to make room for the new residence of 
Mr. Lemmers. Prior to coining to the United States, Cornelius F. 
Lemmers lived at Paris, France, for ten years, and he spoke five languages 
very fluently. His wife was brought to McHenry County five years 
prior to her marriage, by her father, who bought 100 acres of land near 
Ridgeland, but died soon thereafter from sunstroke. 

George William Lemmers attended the public schools of Woodstock, 
and in 1888, when he was seventeen years old, he was graduated from 
the Woodstock High School. He began working in a meat market 
when only nine years old, and continued to spend all of his spare time 
there until he completed his school courses. Mr. Lemmers then began 
working on a farm during the summer, and in the winter worked in the 
office of the McHenry County Democrat, where he remained until 
March 4, 1S89, when he became associated with the abstract office of 
Richards & Jew 7 ett, located where the restroom in the courthouse is now 
placed. During the summer of 1889, Richards & Jcwett erected the 
brick building at No. 130 Cass Street, and here Mr. Lemmers has worked 
continuously ever since, not having missed a day's pay during all that- 
time. On September 1, 1889, the Richards, Jewett & Wright Abstract 
Company was incorporated, and Mr. Lemmers was made treasurer and 
manager, and still holds these positions. 

Mr. Lemmers served for four years in Company G, Illinois National 
Guard, spending six weeks of that time at Chicago during the great 
railroad strike in 1894, helping to guard railroad property. He was 
elected city clerk of W T oodstock in 1896, and served for eight years, and 
in 1913, was elected alderman from the Third Ward, serving two years, 
and served for three years as a member of the board of education, to 
which lie was elected in 1912. Although he cast his first vote for Grover 
Cleveland in 1892, since then he has voted with the Republican party. 
Mr. Lemmers belongs to the Odd Fellows, and was noble grand for two 
years, and secretary for ten years, of Guardian Lodge No. 60; was 
exalted ruler in 1911 and 1918 of Woodstock Lodge No. 1043, B. P. O. E., 
and also served it as secretary; and he belongs to St. Mark's Lodge No. 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 699 

63, A. F. & A. M.; Woodstock Chapter No. 36, R. A. M.; Calvary 
Commandery No. 25, K. T., of which he was commander from 1913 to 
1915; and Tebela Temple, Mystic Shrine of Rockford. 

On August 14, 1894, Mr. Lemmers was married to Stella May Jones, 
born at Woodstock, 111., November 9, 1873, a daughter of Valorous 
Elwayne and Mary (Gardner) Jones, the former of whom was born in 
New York, but moved west wlv n very young, and the latter, born at 
Batavia, 111., October 3, 1840, died May 19, 1916. Her ather was born 
in Renfrewshire, Scotland, and came to America, settling in Cook County, 
111., in 1833, naming the town of Dundee in Kane County. Mr. and 
Mrs. Lemmers have two children, namely: Dorothy Geraldine, born 
August 20, 1895; and Mary Evelyn, born October 23, 1905. 



LOUIS M. LILLIBRIDGE. 

Louis M. Lillibridge, one of the retired farmers of Harvard, has been 
a director of the First State Bank of Harvard since it was organized, 
and was formerly extensively engaged in farming in Dunham Township. 
He was born in Durham Township, April 14, 1846, one of the two 
children of Oliver P. and Matilda (Smith) Lillibridge. Oliver P. Lilli- 
bridge was born in Pennsylvania, and came to McHenry County in 
1842, settling in Marengo Township. He died in 1898, in Dunham 
Township, having been a fanner all his active life. 

Louis M. Lillibridge attended the common schools, and was reared 
upon his father's farm. After reaching his majority, he began farming, 
and was so engaged until 1895, when he retired, but he still owns a fine 
farm of 235 acres of land in Durham Township. 

On February 5, 1868, Mr. Lillibridge was married to Miss Ella 
Billings, a daughter of Capt. William G. Billings, and a member of a 
well known McHenry County family. When the First State Bank of 
Harvard was organized, Mr. Lillibridge was made one of its directors, 
and has maintained that connection with it ever since. For the past 
eighteen years he has been school treasurer and for twelve years he was 
assessor of Durham Township. Politically he is a Republican. Mr. 
and Mrs. Lillibridge have had five children, three of whom survive, 
namely: William P., of St. Charles, 111.; Fannie, J.; and Jessie B., wife 
of Alfred H. Shepherd. Thomas and Gertrude are deceased. Strictly 
honorable in all his dealings, Mr. Lillibridge has always commanded 



700 HISTORY OP McHENRY COUNTY 

the respect and confidence of his associates, and lew men stand any 
higher than he in public opinion. 



SAMUEL L. LINCOLN. 



Samuel L. Lincoln, now deceased, was formerly one of the most 
influential men of Hartland Township, owning and operating a fine farm 
two and one-half miles east of Harvard. He was born in Alexander 
Township, Genesee County, N. Y., June 7, 1840, a son of Apollos and 
Melissa (Waite) Lincoln, a grandson of Daniel Lincoln; great-grandson 
of Purvis Lincoln, and a descendant of General Lincoln of Revolutionary 
fame, from whom Abraham Lincoln was also descended. 

Apollos Lincoln was born at Brattleboro, Vt., June 2, 1802, and he 
died February 22, 1880, aged seventy-eight years. In June, 1845, he 
came to McHenry County, and after renting land for four years, located 
on 120 acres of timber land in Nunda Township, but later sold this farm 
and bought another one in Marengo Township, where he lived the 
remainder of his life. His children were as follows: Gooding \Y., 
Henry M., Elizabeth A., Eunice A., Mary S., Samuel L., and Omar II. 

Samuel L. Lincoln was only an infant when his parents moved to 
Cattaraugus County, N. Y., and not quite five years old when they 
came to McHenry County. His educational training in Illinois was 
supplemented by attendance on a school in New York, alternating 
being a student at the academy at Wauconda, N. Y., with working on 
the farm for two years. After completing his schooling, he began 
teaching school, and followed the practice for thirty-four years of teach- 
ing during the winter months, and farming in the summer, all of his 
schools being located either in Boone, Lake or McHenry counties. 

On April 15, 1868, Mr. Lincoln was married in Ridgefield to Julia 
E. Francisco, born in McHenry County, February 26, 1847, a daughter 
of Peter and Sarah (Ingalls) Francisco. The Francisco family is of 
French descent, but long ago was established in New Y'ork state. Mr. 
and Mrs. Lincoln had the following children: Earl G., who was born 
June 22, 1869, married Man- Strandt, and lives on the home farm ; 
Charity, M., known as Dollie, who was born April 12, 1871, is Mrs. 
E. C. Hammond of Alden Township; Herbert W., who was born June 
30, 1875, died of diphtheria February 22, 1897, when twenty-one years 
old; Clara B., who was born June 14, 1878, lives with her mother: 
Albert W., who was born February 22, 1881, also died of diphtheria 



HISTORY OF McIIENRY COUNTY 701 

February 22, 1897; George M., who was born May 29, 1884, died 
August 15, 1908, when twenty-four years old; and Leon S., who was 
born September 20, 1889, is a rural free delivery carrier, and lives 
with his mother. 

After his marriage Mr. Lincoln lived at Marengo for about twelve 
years and then came to Hartland Township where he bought a farm 
of 163 acres of land, and moved upon it in 1881. He became very 
much interested in milk production and kept about twenty cows him- 
self. At one time he was a director of the Milk Producers Association, 
there being only one other in McHenry County. For some years he 
was interested in -selling brick silos, averaging about twenty a year, 
and saw that they were properly put up. In every way he encouraged 
the farmers in this and adjoining counties to improve their farms and 
fit them for the production of milk, he realizing that this county is an 
ideal locality for that branch of agricultural activity. Being an edu- 
cated man he had a broader outlook than many, and could weigh matters 
and pass judgment intelligently, so that many affairs were submitted 
to him for his advice. Early in life he was a Republican, casting his 
first vote for Abraham Lincoln, but later changed his politics and voted 
for William Jennings Bryan, and continued thereafter with the Demo- 
cratic party. He held the offices of justice of the peace and school 
director for many years. Always very active in school matters as an 
educator and citizen, he was one of the organizers of the McHenry 
County Teachers Institute about 1860-1, and was appointed a member 
of the committee to draft its constitution and by-laws, his associates 
being A. W. Cummings of Chemung, and Edward Haywood of Nunda 
Township. All of his mature years the Methodist Episcopal church 
had in Mr. Lincoln a devout and effective member and worker, and he 
died firm in its faith, November 11, 1917, his remains being interred 
in Oakland Cemetery near Harvard. In his passing McHenry County 
lost one of its venerable figures, and a man whose equal it would be 
difficult to find. Upright and honorable, he gave freely of his means and 
experience toward the betterment of his community and calling, and left 
his neighborhood the better for his having spent practically all of his 
life in it. 



WILLIAM C. LINDERMAN. 

William C. Linderman, general superintendent of the extensive 
lumber business of J. H. Patterson & Company of Union, is rightly 



702 BISTORT OK M< HENRY COUNTY 

numbered among t ho representative men of his community. He was 
born in Boone County, 111., in December, 1865, one of the seven chil- 
dren of Alonzo and Mary Ann (Paul) Linderman. Alonzo Linderman 
was a prosperous farmer of McHenry County, where he died in 1903, 
his widow surviving him until 1906. 

William ( '. Linderman was reared in McHenry County, and attended 
its schools. His first self-supporting employment was on a farm, but 
he left it in 1905 to engage with the J. H. Patterson Lumber Company, 
and in 1907 was made its secretary. 

In 1894 Mr. Linderman was united in marriage with Miss Fannie 
B. Fry, a daughter of Robert Fry, and they have one daughter, Vivian 
\Y.. who is the wife of James Rowland, a civil engineer of Chicago, 111. 
Mr. Linderman is a Republican. Fraternally he is a Mason, and also 
belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America. He and his family arc 
members of the Presbyterian church. Although his business interests 
are centered at L-nion, Mr. Linderman resides at Marengo, where he 
owns his home. A sound and reliable business man, he has risen to a 
position of trust and responsibility, and he is also held in high esteem 
because of his constructive interest in local affairs. 



THOMAS LINDSAY. 



Thomas Lindsay, for many years connected with the agricultural 
activities of Dorr Township, but now deceased, was one of the substan- 
tial men of McHenry County, and one whose memory is held in high 
esteem. He w r as born in Scotland, July 23, 1836, a son of Thomas and 
Marion (Marshall) Lindsay, who came to the United States in 1840, 
and located permanently in McHenry County in 1842, purchasing the 
farm in Dorr Township which later became the property of their son 
Thomas. The father only lived for twelve years after his arrival in 
McHenry County, dying in 1852, but the mother survived him until 
1880. Their children were as follows: Jenette, who married William 
Scott; Thomas, whose name heads this review; Christine, who married 
Oren Allbee; Archibald; Mary A., who married D. Redpath; and Mar- 
garet J., who married Thomas Wier. 

The educational training of Thomas Lindsay, the younger, was 
acquired in the district schools of Dorr Township, and he grew up on the 
homestead. From the time of his father's death until that of his mother, 






K 










i is 












HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 703 

he had charge of the homestead of 200 acres of land, and then acquired 
ownership of it, and operated it very successfully for many years. 

In 1864 when his adopted country was divided in a civil war, Mr. 
Lindsay enlisted in defense of the Union, and served in Company F., 
Ninety-fifth Illinois Volunteer Infantry for one year, when he was 
honorably discharged, and returned to his agricultural labors. 

In 1880, Mr. Lindsay was married to Maggie Pope, a daughter of 
Frederick Pope of Cook County, 111. Mr. and Mrs. Lindsay became 
valued members of the Presbyterian church. A Mason, Mr. Lindsay 
maintained membership with St. Mark's Lodge No. 63, A. F. & A. M. 
of Woodstock. Although some years have passed since Mr. Lindsay's 
demise he is still remembered by the older generation of Woodstock 
and Dorr Township as one of the men who helped to raise the high 
standards for which this region has always been justly celebrated. 



CLARK E. LOCKWOOD. 

Clark E. Lockwood, one of the prosperous farmers of Dorr Township, 
owns and operates a fine farm in the vicinity of Ridgefield. He was born 
in Geneseo, Livingston County, N. Y., January 24, 1859, a son of Minor 
and Belva (Sutton) Lockwood, natives of Connecticut and New York, 
respectively. In 1861 these parents came to McHenry County to join 
Mrs. Lockwood's brother, James Clark Sutton, who had lived for some 
years in Dorr Township on what is still known as the J. C. Sutton farm, 
lying between Ridgefield and Woodstock. Minor Lockwood first 
bought a farm adjoining the present one of his son, Clark E. Lockwood, 
but sold it and in 1872 bought the homestead, one mile west of Ridgefield, 
and five miles south of Woodstock. It comprised over seventy acres 
of land, the greater part of which was improved. He left the farm in 
1899, and moved to Woodstock, where he died April 1, 1916, aged 
eighty-seven years, having spent all of his active years in agricultural 
work. He was very prominent in the Presbyterian church of Ridgefield, 
later transferring to the one at Woodstock. His first wife died in 1893, 
and three years later he was united in marriage with Mrs. Frances M. 
Duffield, who survives him and lives at Woodstock. She was a widow, 
whose maiden name had been Sawyer. By his first marriage Minor 
Lockwood had the following children: Cora, who died in childhood; 



7ii4 IIlsTnKY OF McHENEY COUNTY 

Clark E., whose name heads tliis review; Elmer, who lives at Elgin, 111.; 
and Mary E., who is Mrs. J. F. Wilson of Marengo. 

Clark E. Loekwood has always lived in MeHenry County since being 
brought here in 1861. After he attained to hi.s maturity he rented land 
for seven years, and then, in 1X91), returned to the homestead and 
worked it for his father until in 1900 when he bought it. He is a 
Republican, and for about fourteen years served as a justice of the 
peace, and was on the school board for twelve years. 

On February 28, 1894, Mr. Loekwood was united in marriage with 
Georgia E. Murphy, a daughter of Elijah Beddings ami Josephine 
(Hakes) Murphy, now deceased, but formerly of Greenwood Township. 
Mrs. Murphy was born in New York, but brought to MeHenry County 
when a child, but Mr. Murphy was a native son of the county, and he died 
February 17, 1915, having spent his entire life on the farm where he Was 
born, and which is still a part of his estate. Mr. and Mrs. Loekwood 
have one daughter, Cora M., who is a teacher. After being graduated 
from the Dundee High School, she taught for two years in the MeHenry 
High School, and then was graduated from the State Normal School at 
Charleston, 111. Miss Loekwood is an able educator, and accomplished 
young lady. Mr. Loekwood has belonged to the Modern Woodmen of 
America for thirty years, and his wife belongs to the Royal Neighbors. 



CHARLES JOSEPH LOCKWOOD. 

Charles Joseph Loekwood, who has always lived on the farm he now 
owns, is one of the successful dairymen and farmers of Coral Township. 
He was born in a portion of his present residence, May 2, 1863, a son of 
Charles and Sarah (Kennedy) Loekwood, both natives of New York, 
and grandson of Joseph and Dolly Loekwood. The family came to 
MeHenry County at the same time as Rush Bartholomew, the Cobbs 
ami Thomases, all of whom were neighbors in New York. They entered 
land in such a way as to continue to be neighbors, and Joseph Loekwood 
secured the farm now owned by his grandson. Charles Joseph, whom 
he never saw, he dying before the latter's birth. At the time he entered 
it, the farm was covered with timber and contained sloughs and ridges, 
only the latter being cultivated. 

Charles Loekwood was born May 12, 1812, and died December 30, 
1901. He was the only child of his parents, whom he accompanied to 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COIXTV TO.") 

McHenry County in 1844, and spent the remainder of his life on the 
Coral Township farm. He was married (first) to Jerusha Miller, who 
died leaving two children, namely: Mary, who is Mrs. Leham Warner, 
of Mendota, 111.; and J. Henry, who married Hattie Woodworth, of 
Chicago. The second wife of Charles Lockwood was Sarah Kennedy, 
and she was born February 20, 1830, and died February 5, 1911. She 
came to McHenry County with her parents when she was a child, and 
here met Mr. Lockwood, to whom she was united in 1880. The children 
of Mr. Lockwood's second marriage were as follows: Jennie, who is 
unmarried, is a nurse and dressmaker and lives at the old home; and 
Charles Joseph, whose name heads this review. Charles Lockwood was 
one of the organizers of the Harmony Methodist church, and continued 
a member of it until his death. When he was a lad he was frail of con- 
stitution, and so his parents had him well educated, and the studious 
habits he then formed continued with him the remainder of his life. 
He was a great reader, kept himself well posted on current events, and 
was a recognized authority in his neighborhood. 

Charles Joseph Lockwood not only owns his father's homestead of 
165 acres of land, but also a second farm of 169 acres adjoining. He 
carries on dairying with from twenty-five to thirty cows. In addition 
to farming, Mr. Lockwood is engaged in buying, selling and shipping 
stock, and has handled considerable real estate, at one time owning 
several farms in O'Brien County, Iowa. The reclamation of the old 
farm has been carried on by Mr. Lockwood, and about half of it has been 
thus developed through the use of tile. His father and grandfather 
were Democrats, but he is a Republican. 

On February 5, 1896, Charles J. Lockwood was married to Carrie 
Shellington, a daughter of James and Ellen (Kelley) Shellington, at 
Marengo. She was born on her father's farm three miles west of Mar- 
engo, on the State Road, and prior to her marriage, was a bookkeeper 
in an insurance office at Marengo. James Shellington died Apri' 20, 
1903, aged eighty-eight years, having been born in May, 1815. He was 
married in 1856 to Elizabeth Hagen, and they had three children, 
namely: Maria, who is Mrs. Fuller, of Chicago; Maggie, who is Mrs. 
Tiedeman, of Chicago; and Lizzie, who is Mrs. Charles Shearer, of Rock- 
ford, 111. His second wife was Ellen Kelley, and they had children as 
follows: Ella, who is Mrs. Warren Jordan, of Marengo; Sadie, who is 
Mrs. Chauncey Wheeler, of Marengo; Carrie, who married Charles J. 
Lockwood; and James Shellington, of Marengo. Mr. Shellington 



706 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

retired to Marengo twenty-five years before his death. He belonged 
to the Episcopal church. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lockwood became the parents of the following children: 
Clarence, who was graduated from the Marengo High School in 1919; 
George, who is attending the Marengo High School; and one child who 
died in infancy. The family belong to the Methodist Episcopal church 
of Riley Township and are active in its good work. Mr. Lockwood is 
recognized as one of the leading men of his township and deserves the 
prosperity which has fallen to his lot. He and Mrs. Lockwood enjoy 
entertaining their many friends at their delightful rural home, and are 
the center of a pleasant neighborhood social circle. 



GEORGE LOWE. 



George Lowe, one of the men whose work in behalf of agriculture 
places him in the front ranks of the great army of farmers of McHenry 
County, owns a fine farm in Algonquin Township, two miles north of 
Algonquin, and one and one-half miles south of Carey Station. He 
was born at London, Ontario, Canada, February 28, 1859, a son of George 
Lowe, who was born in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, February 29, 1824, 
and came to Ontario, Canada, in 1852, and there was married in 1857 
to Jessie Watson. She was born in Bammffshire, Scotland, and came 
to Ontario, Canada, in 1852. 

Although a farmer in Scotland, George Lowe turned his attention 
to other work after coming to the New World, his first employment 
after reaching it was the laying of ties for the old suspension bridge 
over Niagara Falls. Later he became a railroad contractor on what 
is now the Grand Trunk Railroad in Ontario, securing the contract for 
laying 100 miles of cattle guards along the railroad. In 1863 he moved 
to McHenry County, 111., and bought land one and one-half miles north 
of Algonquin Township, and there he died August 4, 1906. His wife 
died January 28, 1898. Their children were as follows: Mary A., who 
is unmarried, lives at Elgin, 111.; George, whose name heads this review: 
John W., who died at Osseo, Wis., in 1917, at the age of fifty-seven 
years; Jessie, who married Frank Svoboda, who is living retired at 
Algonquin; Elsie, who married Ralph McCarthy, lives at Elgin, 111.; 
Cora, who is Mrs. James Stewart of Carej r , 111., and James A., a sketch 
of whom appears elsewhere in this work. 



HISTORY OF McHEXRY COUNTY 707 

George Lowe, the younger, remained on his father's homestead, and 
attended the old Miller school of Algonquin Township. When he was 
twenty-one years old he rented the Siebert farm of 285 acres, and 
handled a large amount of stock in connection with it until he bought 
his present farm of 255 acres, then known as the Hamilton property. 
It lies along the Fox River for one-half a mile, and about one-half of 
it is under cultivation. Later he sold some of the land, so that the 
farm now comprises 200 acres. The land he disposed of was not suitable 
for tilling, but is admirably adapted for summer homes and is used for 
this purpose. He carries on dairying with about forty head of high- 
grade Holstein cattle, and his improvements are good. The farm is 
beautifully located overlooking the valley of the Fox River with its 
timbered scenery. While he is a strong Republican, he cannot be induced 
to permit the use of his name on the party ticket, for he has no inclina- 
tion for public life, preferring to exert his influence for civic betterment 
in a private capacity. 

When Mr. Lowe was thirty-five years old, he was married to Elizabeth 
Surfleet, of Carey, a daughter of Edmond Surfieet, now deceased, born 
in England, who became a farmer near Carey. Mrs. Lowe's mother 
bore the name of Anna, and she, too, is deceased. The birth of Mrs. 
Lowe took place at Crystal Lake. Mr. and Mrs. Lowe have the fol- 
lowing children: Marshall, Alice, Watson, Marian, Ruth, Robert, 
John, Dorothy and Esther. Mr. Lowe has been a great reader and 
observer, and relates many interesting stories illustrative of conditions 
during the pioneer period, and owns some very valuable relics of those 
days. One of these stories relates the efficiency and bravery of Mrs. 
Margaret Gilligan. The Gilligan family were the first settlers on the 
west side of the Fox River, coming there in 1834. The pride of Mrs. 
Gilligan's heart was her cook stove, for the majority of the pioneers 
had to depend upon open fireplaces and "Dutch" ovens, and so when 
a band of Indians entered her little cabin and taking a liking to this 
luxurious article, made way with it, the intrepid lady followed them 
up the Fox River to McHenry, a distance of twenty miles, and recovered 
her property, bearing it back with pride on horseback. She lived to be 
over ninety years of age, residing in McHenry County until within a 
year of her death, which occurred in Missouri at the home of a daughter, 
she having lost her own home by fire. Another incident of the Gilligan 
family related by Mr. Lowe is relative to a man hired by John Gilligan 
from Chicago to haul out a few sacks of barley. This man, named 
Thomas, set out for Algonquin Township, ahead of Mr. Gilligan, who 



708 HISTORY OF MrllEXKY COUNTY 

overtook him, finding him stuck with his wagon in one of the many 
mudholes. Mr. Thomas was seeking to lighten the load by removing 
the sacks of barley, and called upon Mr. GilHgan to hrlp him. After a 
heated argument, in which he failed to convince Mr. Gilligan to help 
him, Mr. Thomas threw the barley in the mud and drove away. Mr. 
Gilligan's contention was that as he had hired Mr. Thomas to deliver 
the grain, it was not his place to render any assistance. This incident 
tides to prove that human nature has not changed much since pioneer 
days. Another pioneer of the Fox River valley was Jesse Miller, who 
died at Algonquin when nearly ninety years old. He was the first 
settler on the east side of the Fox River, coming there in 1834, and 
locating at Millers Grove, in Kane County. Later he came to Algonquin 
Township, and the Miller School is named for him. The pioneers have 
passed away, but the work they accomplished remains and it is hut 
fitting that proper recognition be paid to them, in a record of this digni- 
fied character, so that the coming generations may understand some 
of the hardships and privations of the brave men and women who made 
McHenry County one of the most famous dairy regions in the state, 
and laid the foundation for its other claims to prestige. 



JAMES A. LOWE. 



James A. Lowe, one of the successful farmers and extensive land- 
owners of Algonquin Township, is a man widely known and respected. 
He was born one and one-half miles north of Algonquin, December 21, 
1870, a son of George Lowe. Until he was twenty-two years old, James 
A. Lowe remained on the homestead, and alternated attendance in the 
country schools with farm work, learning from his father the funda- 
mentals of farming. When he left home, he rented the W. P. Thompson 
farm, and conducted it for two years, keeping sixty cows. He then 
moved to the Ed Benson farm which joined his father's homestead. 
Here he also had sixty cows and remained two years, and upon leaving 
it he began handling stock, buying, selling and shipping cattle and horses 
to Algonquin, remaining in this business fifteen years. A portion of the 
time he continued to farm, making milk production his feature until 
within recent years he has been handling horses to meet the local demand, 
buying from four to five carloads annually and selling them to the fanners. 
Mr. Lowe has dealt quite heavily in farm property, and now owns four 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 709 

farms, amounting to 700 acres. All these farms are used for milk pro- 
duction. He keeps tenants on these farms. In all, he owns 135 head 
of Holstein cattle, and keeps on making improvements on his properties, 
for he is a progressive man and recognizes the wisdom of keeping his 
plants up to standard in every respect. His farm equipments conform 
to state regulations and are admirably fitted to increase the product and 
add to the value of the property. For twenty-two years he has resided 
in Algonquin, where he has a pleasant home. 

When he was twenty-seven years old, Mr. Lowe was united in 
marriage with Isabel Fyfe, of Shelby, Neb., and they have five children, 
namely: Edna Mae, who graduated from the Elgin High School in 1919 
and is now attending the Wisconsin University; Winnifred Mary, who 
graduated from the Elgin High School in 1921, and is now attending 
Beloit College, Beloit, Wisconsin; George W., who is attending Elgin 
High School; Jessie Isabel and Margaret Fyfe, both of whom are attend- 
ing school in Algonquin. 

Mr. Lowe is a man who understands agricultural matters thoroughly, 
and having been engaged in all of the branches of farm life is an authority 
upon them. His operations have been carried on intelligently and 
systematically, and the results prove that he has adopted the best 
course. It is such men as he who have given McHenry County its 
prestige as the greatest dairy county in the state. His success encourages 
others to devote themselves to milk production, for which the farms of 
this region are so admirably adapted. He is a man who, while not 
desiring public life, takes an intelligent interest in progress, and is a 
friend to the public schools, good roads and other improvements, and 
can be relied upon to give his support to measures looking forward to 
their advancement. 



VESPER J. LOWE. 



Vesper J. Lowe, manager of the Caselu Manufacturing Company of 
Union, and member of the school board, is one of the men who makes 
his influence felt in his community. He was born at Elgin, 111., March 
22, 1859, one of the seven children of Venrenssaler J. and Jerusha Lowe. 
Venrenssaler J. Lowe was born October 25, 1816, and died February 12,, 
1881. 

Growing up at Elgin, Vesper J. Lowe attended the schools of that 
city and learned to be a blacksmith, following that trade for some years. 



710 HISTORY OF McIIENRY COFNTY 

He also was engaged in handling sugar of milk upon an extensive scale, 
and (hen in 1900 embarked in his present business, and since 1909 has 
been its manager, and has been instrumental in developing it to its 
present proportions. 

On August 8, 1894, Mr. Lowe was married to Miss Gertrude Barber, 
a daughter of Joseph Barber, and they have the following children: 
Vernon J., who is a veteran of the World War; Howard; Stella, who is 
Mrs. A. G. Anderson, of Great Lakes, 111.; and Miss Grace and Donald 
D., who are at home. They have an adopted daughter, Cora, who was 
born October 30, 1890. Mr. and Mrs. Lowe and their children belong 
to the Baptist church. In politics he is a Republican, and, in April 
1914, he was elected a member of the school board of Marengo, where he 
maintains his residence. 



VINCENT SILAS LUMLEY. 

Vincent Silas Lumley, state's attorney of McHenry County, and 
senior member of the legal firm of Lumley & Allen, is one of the most 
prominent attorneys of this region, and a man whose character both in 
public and private life is without a blemish. He was born at Ringwood, 
McHenry County, December 26, 1867, a son of Thomas R. and Eliza 
(Mitchell) Lumley. The Lumley family are of English descent, their 
history having been identified with Yorkshire, England, from a remote 
period. They were the founders of a fraternal organization, The 
Foresters, originally composed solely of members of that family but 
into which, at a later period, members of other English families were 
admitted. 

Thomas R. Lumley, the father of Vincent S. Lumley, was born in 
Yorkshire, England, July 3, 1827, the son of Thomas Emanuel and Man- 
Ann Lumley, and was reared to be a farmer in his native country. His 
father, Thomas Emanuel Lumley, also a native of Yorkshire, was a 
farmer, and had three brothers, all of whom, like himself, were men of 
prominence and considerable property. Of these, John, now deceased, 
was a well-to-do citizen of Scriven, England; Mathew was a piano 
manufacturer of Hull, England; and Edwin was during his lifetime an 
extensive farmer of Yorkshire. Thomas Emanuel Lumley served as a 
soldier during the French-English War, under the Duke of Wellington, 
and participated in the battle of Waterloo. A former Lord Lumley, 




> nnJ <yy Caw ^.-,^/C 



HISTORY OF McIIENRY COUNTY 711 

connected with this family, was friendly to the Puritans and assisted 
some of them in their efforts to reach the American Colonies during the 
days of their persecution. Thomas E. Lumley married Mary Ann 
Wright, and they had an excellent home in Yorkshire where the following 
named children were born to them: John, Helen E., James, William, 
Thomas Robert, and Mary Ann. Thomas E. Lumley died in England 
in 1863, and his wife died in 1848. 

Of the above family Thomas R. and William Lumley sailed from 
Liverpool, England, for America, in 1851, the voyage to New York 
consuming six weeks. After landing they came to Huntley, McHenry 
County, direct from New York, and obtained employment for a time 
on what is now the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad. Later they 
joined the John S. Cummings Company in an expedition across the 
plains to California. While in California Thomas R. Lumley engaged 
in the merchandise business for two years, but in 1854 returned to 
McHenry County. He then bought 335 acres of land in Ringwood 
Prairie, a portion of which was improved and known as the Halcomb 
Farm, but the remainder was unimproved. Here he erected one of the 
finest farmhouses of that period in McHenry County. 

On May 3, 1858, Thomas R. Lumley was married to Ann Eliza 
Mitchell, born at Kingsville, Ashtabula County, Ohio, February 22, 
1836, a daughter of Silas Robert and Mary S. (Hopkins) Mitchell. 
After marriage Mr. Lumley settled on his farm in McHenry County, 
where he acquired a large estate, at one time owning 1,000 acres of land. 
Among his later acquisitions were the Tryon Farm of 275 acres in Heb- 
ron Township, and the Peterson Farm of 218 acres in Greenwood Town- 
ship. Mr. Lumley and his wife remained on their farm until 1888, 
when they removed to Woodstock, and later to Chicago. He was a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church, in which he filled the office 
of steward for many years. Politically he was a Republican, but he 
was in no sense an office seeker, preferring to give his attention to his 
large farming and other activities. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lumley were the parents of the following children: 
Frank B., Clinton G., Genevieve L., Vincent S., Edwin T., Wallace J., 
and Stanley M., who died August 24, 1890, aged eighteen years. Mr. 
Lumley died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Tryon, at Chicago, 
November 14, 1896, aged sixty-nine years. Of their children, Clinton 
G. was graduated from the University of Illinois and the Chicago Med- 
ical College, and is now a practicing physician of Chicago; he married 
Miss Nellie McLean of Urbana, 111., a graduate of the University of 



712 HISTORY OK McHENKY COUNTY 

Illinois, and they have four children, Harold M., Leslie, Axlene and 
Dorothy. Edwin T. Lumley took courses in the Dixon Business Col- 
lege, and the Illinois School of Pharmacy, and is a druggist of Chicago. 
Wallace J. was graduated from the Uixon Business College and the 
Illinois School of Pharmacy, and is a resident of Elgin, 111. Frank B. 
married Fred Tryon of McHenry County and they have three children: 
Glendara II., who married W. V. Hoff, of Blue Island. Floyd C, and 
Verna E. Mr. Tryon died in 1894, and his widow now resides at Wood- 
stock. Genevieve L. married George T. Goodnow, who is associated 
with the firm of Benjamin Moore & Company of Chicago, and they 
have one child, Pauline. Wallace J. married Margaret Weast. Edwin 
T. married Cecil Erickson, and they have two children, Gerald and Ber- 
nice. 

Vincent S. Lumley was reared among the peaceful scenes of rural 
life in Ringwood Prairie, one of the most beautiful of the smaller prairies 
which dot the rich landscape of Northern Illinois. Here he passed his 
youthful days, and attended the public schools, acquiring the foundation 
of a good education under the instruction of Rev. William Nickle. 
He then attended the normal school at Normal, 111., and later was 
graduated from the Northern Business College at Dixon, 111., where 
he was valedictorian of his class. After being engaged in teaching 
school at McHenry, for a year, he entered the law department at the 
University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, from which he was graduated 
in 1S88 when only twenty years of age, at which time he delivered the 
class oration. The year previous, when nineteen, he was admitted to 
practice law in the state of Michigan and at Ann Arbor, and with a 
single exception, was the youngest student in a class of 142, the others 
not only being older, but many of them were able lawyers in active prac- 
tice. 

In 18SS, the year of his graduation, Mr. Lumley engaged in practice 
at Woodstock, in partnership with the late Judge T. D. Murphy, which 
association continued until the death of the latter. Since that even he 
practiced alone until he formed a partnership with Charles T. Allen, 
in 1915. Politically Mr. Lumley is a staunch Republican. In 1896, 
he was elected state's attorney of McHenry County, receiving a plurality 
of fifty-nine votes over those cast for William McKinley for the pres- 
idency, and securing the largest majority ever given to any candidate 
for office in the county. In 1900 Mr. Lumley was re-elected, was again 
returned to office in 1916, and in 1920. 

In 1892, Mr. Lumley was united in marriage with Neva D. Bunker, 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 713 

at Woodstock. She was horn in this city, a daughter of Amos and Dell 
(Sherman) Bunker. They have two daughters. Mr. Lumley belongs 
to the Odd Fellows and several benevolent organizations. 



PEHR HJALMER LUNDGREN. 

Pehr Hj aimer Lundgren, now living retired at Marengo, is one of 
the highly respected men of McHenry County, who was born at Lind- 
shafen, state of Ostergotland, Sweden, on May 5, 1845. He came to 
the United States in 1868, and after he landed in New York City, being 
a painter by trade, he secured a job painting a fruit vessel. This vessel 
was to make the trip between New York and New Orleans, touching 
at Aspinwall, and he was to do the work while on the water. For it 
he was paid $115 in addition to his board. Unfortunately yellow fever 
broke out on board so he was very glad to reach New Orleans without 
being stricken down with the scourge. From that city he came north as 
far as St. Louis, and thence to Chicago, where he was offered work, but 
having a friend at Des Moines, Iowa, decided to join him, and the two 
went to work painting stage coaches for the line which then ran between 
Des Moines and Boone, Iowa, for at that time there was no railroad. 
After the Chicago fire Mr. Lundgren came to Chicago, thinking to find 
work during the rebuilding period, but through a friend secured a job 
of painting the machines manufactured by the Easton Harvester Com- 
pany at Sycamore, 111., remaining there for two years, and was soon 
made foreman over twenty men. In the meanwhile, during the summer, 
when work was slack at the shop, he secured work house painting, and 
some of these houses were at Marengo. The locality so pleased him, 
that he finally located permanently in this city. 

In October, 1876, Mr. Lundgren was married to Delilah Renwick, 
a daughter of Walter and Mary Ann (Haynes) Renwick, natives of 
New York and Virginia. Mr. Renwick was a stone mason and con- 
tractor and did considerable work on canal locks in the east. Sub- 
sequently he came to McHenry County, locating on a farm one mile 
east of Marengo, where Mrs. Lundgren was born, March 30, 1850. 
Mr. and Mrs. Renwick had in addition to Mrs. Lundgren the following 
children: William, who is living retired at Marengo; James Walter, 
who lives in California; and Randolph, who lives at Belvidere, 111. 
Mr. Renwick died in 1881, age eighty-one years, his widow surviving 



714 BISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

liini for fifteen years. She lived with Mr. and Mrs. Lundgren the last 
four years, and then died at the age of eighty-two. The old Renwick 
farm has since been sold. 

Mr. Lundgren secured a farm two miles north, and one and one- 
quarter miles west of Marengo, on the Kiswaukce River Road, and 
still owns that 103 acres, upon which he lived until 1900. He then 
returned to Marengo, and continued his painting. He has bought 
and sold a few farms at a profit to himself, for he is a good judge of land 
values. In addition to doing all kinds of outside painting, Mr. Lund- 
gren carried on contracting as an interior decorator. He built his present 
home after the model furnished him by his father's residence in Sweden, 
where his father was a large farmer, distiller and hotel man. Mr. 
Lundgren has been back to his native land upon several occasions, the 
first time after ten years' absence from it, and again after his father's 
death. His mother died in 1897, aged seventy-nine years. He had 
three brothers who died in Chicago, the last two from injuries received 
in accidents. Mr. and Mrs. Lundgren became the parents of four 
children as follows: Carl Leonard, who was graduated from the State 
University at Champaign, 111., as a civil engineer, has experience as a 
professional ball player, and is now coach for the ball team of the Univer- 
sity of Michigan at Ann Arbor, Mich., and a traveling salesman during 
vacation times; Franz Emil, who was graduated from the Marengo 
High School in 1907, died August 29, 1917, unmarried, being at that 
time an employe of a clothing store; Eva, who was a stenographer was 
made private secretary of Robert J. Blum, head man of the cash depart- 
ment of Sears Roebuck & Company of Chicago, and later was married 
to Mr. Blum; and Alma, who married Jesse Getman, a traveling sales- 
man of Belvidere, 111. Mr. Lundgren is a member of the Odd Fellows. 
The family are members of the Presbyterian church. Mr. Lundgren 
has made nine round trips between the United States and Sweden, 
and has toured Europe several times. 



HENRY MACKEBEX. 



Henry Mackcben, mayor of Huntley, is one of the progressive farmers 
of McHenry County, and is extensively engaged in the raising of straw- 
1m >rries, raspberries and all small fruits for the market. He was born 
in Hanover, Germany, in 1863, and came to the United States in 1805 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 715 

with his parents, after a seven-weeks' ocean voyage. They first located 
at Plum Grove, 111., where they remained three years, when they moved 
to Lake Zurich, 111., where his father managed the 700-acre Fox estate, 
and in 1S72, he, with his parents, came to Harmony, in Coral Township, 
and bought the old Marshall farm where they lived and the children 
were schooled. In 1887 Mr. Mackeben went to Chicago and started 
to work for Thomas O'Brien, in the milk business. In 1888 he was 
married to Miss Lena Lambrecht at which time he purchased the business 
of Mr. O'Brien and which he conducted for two years. 

After the death of his father he disposed of his business and purchased 
the old homestead and a few years later purchased the adjoining farm. 

In 1901 he moved with his family to Huntley, where he has since 
continued to live. Mr. Mackeben was a member of the village board 
of trustees for several years and in 1917 was elected mayor of Huntley, 
giving the little city a wise and business-like administration. 

In 1910 Mr. Mackeben started in the fruit business on a small scale, 
increasing year by year until his gardens now cover fourteen acres. 
He has made a study of all plant life giving his entire time and thought 
to that end. He is ably assisted in this work by his two children, namely: 
Harley H. and Ida. 



JOHN W. MAIR. 



John W. Mair, manager of the Crystal Lake Branch of the Bowman 
Dairy Company, is one of the leading business men of McHenry County, 
and one whose sagacity and knowledge of the affairs of his concern 
recommend him to those in authority. He was born in Scotland, No- 
vember 8, 1867, one of the twelve children of William and Jane (Rich- 
mond) Mair, both of whom were natives of Scotland, and are now de- 
ceased. His father was a farmer by occupation. 

John W. Mair attended the public schools of Scotland, and com- 
pleted his studies in Kelmornock Academy. In 1894, he came to the 
United States, locating in Illinois, where he became associated with 
extensive interests in the creamery business, and in 1910, came to 
Crystal Lake as manager of the plant of the Bowman Dairy Company. 
The present plant was built in 1902, and has a capacity of 60,000 pounds 
of milk per day. Mr. Mair has thirty-five people under his supervision. 

In 1909 Mr. Mair was married to Miss Hattie Wyant, and he and 



71(5 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

his wife arc members of the Methodist Episcopal church. He believes 
in the principles of the Republican party, supports its candidates with 
his vote, and served Crystal Lake as alderman for one term. His 
fraternal connections are with the Odd Fellows and the Mystic Workers 
of the World. In addition to his residence, Mr. Mair owns sixteen acres 
of land within the corporate limits of his municipality, and 100 acres 
in Nunda Township. 



BENJAMIN F. MANLEY. 

Benjamin F. Manley, attorney-at-law, and one of the best known 
lawyers of McHenry County, deserves the prestige to which he has 
attained, for he has won it fairly and honorably. He was born at Alden, 
111., December 31, 1868, one of the four children of Henry F. and Harriet 
A. (Class) Manley. Henry F. Manley was born in Vermont, but later 
came to Alden, 111., where he lived until his retirement from farming, 
when he located at Harvard, and there died. During the Civil War, 
he served as a brave soldier. 

After going to the schools of Alden, Mr. Manley attended the Western 
Normal Commercial Institute, from which he was graduated in 1894, 
following which he took a course in the legal department of the North- 
western University, and was graduated therefrom in October, 1899. 
He then entered the firm of Gann & Peaks of Chicago, with which he 
continued until October, 1902, when he located at Harvard, where he 
has since remained. In 1905, he was elected a member of the school 
board, and held office until May 1, 1919, and was city attorney of Har- 
vard from May, 1907, to May, 1919, and served as Mayor of Harvard 
from May 1, 1919, to May 1, 1921. He is a member of the McHenry 
Bar Association of which he is vice president. Fraternally, he is a 
Mason and Odd Fellow, and Elk. 

Mr. Manley was married to Miss Effie M. Justice, a daughter of 
John 0. Justice of Bushnell, 111. Mr. and Mrs. Manley have one son, 
John Henry, who is at home. They are members of the First Presby- 
terian church of Harvard, of which Mr. Manley is a trustee. He is 
recognized as one of the leading attorneys of the county, and his services 
in an official capacity to Harvard are considerable, and are appreciated, 
as is shown by his re-election to office. 



HISTORY OP McHENKY COUNTY 717 

WILLIS HOMER MANN. 

Willis Homer Mann, now deceased, was for some years extensively 
engaged in handling real estate at Woodstock, where his last years were 
spent, and where he left a lasting impress upon the city's welfare. He 
was born at Plymouth, Wayne County, Mich., November 14, 1854, a 
son of Levi and Melvina Mann. 

After a boyhood spent in Michigan, Willis H. Mann engaged in 
farming near Broadhead, Wis., and developed a very valuable farm and 
learned to know the agricultural business in all its branches. During 
1903, he retired from farming, and coming to McHenry County, estab- 
lished himself in a real estate business at Woodstock, expanding until 
he carried on extensive transactions, and controlled many and varied 
interests. He was thus engaged when claimed by death on November 
16, 1915. 

Mr. Mann was united in marriage on March 2, 1871, with Ada 
Howard, at Carson City, Mich., a daughter of Eben and Elizabeth 
(Ryan) Howard of Jackson, Mich. Mr. and Mrs. Mann became the 
parents of the following children: Lilly, Charles H., Floyd, Lizzie, 
Millard, Earl, Georgia and Homer. Mr. Mann and his family early 
began attending the services of the Baptist Church, although Mr. Mann 
was not a member of any religious denomination. 



CHARLES E. MARKS. 



Charles E. Marks, stock breeder, and dairyman, is one of the pro- 
gressive men of Woodstock, and one who is fully alive to the possibilities 
of his calling and the importance of the advancement of his community. 
He was born in Jo Daviess County, 111., February 28, 1880, a son of 
J. H. and Eleanor A. Marks, highly respected residents of Woodstock, 
having made this city their home for the past three years. J. H. Marks 
was also born in Jo Daviess County, about sixty-four years ago, his 
parents having come to that section from England. The parents of his 
wife came originally from England and the Isle of Man. He is a large 
owner of McHenry County farm land, and devotes his attention to 
supervising its cultivation. 

Charles E. Marks was five years old when he was taken to Grant 
County, Wis., where he lived during his educational period, attending 



718 BISTORT OF .Mc HENRY COUNTY 

the local schools and Laurence College at Appleton, Wis. Early in his 
career, he became associated with his father in stock dealing and 
handling farm land, their operations extending over several states, in- 
cluding South Dakota. However, Mr. Marks was impressed with the 
superior advantages offered for dairying in McHenry County, and in 
1915 bought 295 acres of land adjoining the city of Woodstock, where 
he made extensive improvements. His farm is now regarded as one of 
the model ones of the county. A tenant occupies the house on the 
farm, Mr. Marks having erected for his own use a handsome residence 
on the city line, but near his farm so that his family can enjoy both 
country and urban advantages. Mr. Marks erected and equipped a 
modern and sanitary milk plant for bottling milk and making butter 
for the city trade at Woodstock, and has Guernsey cows, tuberculin 
tested, producing the best quality of milk. His policy is "service and 
quality." He is a breeder of pure-bred Duroc-Jersey swine. 

On December 26, 1908, Mr. Marks was united in marriage to Grace 
W. Willison, and they have three children, namely: Charles Donald, 
Chester Edgar and Marjorie May. The Methodist Episcopal church 
holds his membership. Long a Mason, he is well thought of in that 
order, and his wife is equally interested in the Eastern Star of which 
both are members. An intelligent and experienced farmer, Mr. Marks 
is deservedly numbered among the leaders in his calling in this part of 
the state. For two years he was a member of the city council of Wood- 
stock. 



HENRY FOSTER MARKS. 

Henry Foster Marks, now living retired at Huntley, is one of the 
substantial men of McHenry County. He was born at Homer, Cortland 
County, N. Y., August 23, 1843, a son of Azef and Ann (Wallace) 
Marks, natives of Ohio and England, who were married in New York. 
When Henry Foster Marks was thirteen years old, the family came to 
McHenry County, and the father located on the Sherman farm two 
miles south of Woodstock, but two years later went on a farm four miles 
north of Huntley, which he subsequently bought. Still later, he moved 
to Westside, Crawford County, Iowa. 

Henry Foster Marks lived in McHenry County from the time he 
was thirteen years old until his father went to Westside, Iowa, when he 
accompanied him, but after helping to develop a new farm, he sold his 




/£5*/ J}fs^2£y*t) t 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 719 

interests, and returned to Huntley, where he spent several years, and 
then went to Missouri for a year. Once more he returned to Illinois, 
and for twelve years conducted a milk route in Chicago. He then went 
back to McHenry County for two years, when he was offered the position 
of superintending a flat building at Chicago, which he accepted, and 
held it for about ten years. Mr. Marks then returned to Huntley and 
since then has been practically retired. Having served during the 
Civil War as a soldier, he was interested in the Grand Army of the 
Republic, and belonged to Old Glory Post at Chicago, but never con- 
nected himself with the post at Huntley. He generally attends the 
reunions, especially of his regiment, and spent a week in camp on the 
Fiftieth anniversary of the battle of Gettysburg, and is now the only 
survivor of all of the men who went into the service from Huntley. 

Mr. Marks was married to Rene Grimley of Huntley, born in New 
York, February 28, 1849, and they have two sons, namely: William 
Ernest, who married Martha Allen, is a real estate dealer of Oak Park, 
111.; and Alfred Earl, who is a promoter of oil stock at Kansas City, Mo. 



ROBERT F. MARSHALL. 

Robert F. Marshall, one of the leading members of the McHenry 
County bar, is one of the most prominent men of this part of the state, 
and his public-spirited efforts have been largely instrumental in bringing 
about many of the recent improvements in local conditions. He was 
born at Rockford, 111., June 8, 1880, one of the three children of his 
parents, William and Almira (Herrick) Marshall. William Marshall was 
also an attorney of distinction in McHenry County and at Rockford, 
and he died at Chicago, 111., April 23, 1902. 

Robert F. Marshall attended the schools of Rockford, Academy of 
Beloit College, and the law department of the Northwestern University, 
from which he was graduated in 1907 and he was admitted to the bar in 
the fall of the same year. From 1907 to 1909 he was employed as a law 
clerk with one of the large law firms in Chicago. From 1909 to 1912 he 
was engaged in practice at Rockford, and then located at Harvard, 
forming a partnership with the late Calvin J. Hendricks. With the 
exception of the three years he spent in Rockford he has made Harvard 
his home since the spring of 1899. In December, 1917, Mr. Marshall, 
moved by the spirit of patriotism, relinquished his enviable position 



720 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

among the attorneys of McHenry ( lounty to enlist in Army Y. M. ( '. A. 
work and was first stationed at ('amp Logan, where the One Hundred 
and Twenty-ninth Infantry trained for overseas work. He was unable 
to ge\ an assignment for overseas duty with this organization, and was 
assigned to Y. M. ( '. A. duty on the (". S. S. Pocahontas. He has 
visited Brest, France, and made numerous trips hack and forth in the 
discharge of his duty. Many of the returning soldiers will hold .Mr. 
.Marshall in affectionate and grateful remembrance for his service to 
them. 

On September 23, 1911, Mr. Marshall was married to Miss Blanche 
Marshall, a daughter of Hugh Marshall, of Kansas. Mr. and Mrs. 
Marshall have one son, Hugh F., who was born November 26, 1918. 
They are members of the Presbyterian church. Mr. Marshall is a 
Republican and city attorney of Harvard. Fraternally, Mr. Marshall 
is a Knight Templar Mason and prominent in his order. With the 
cessation of his war duties, Mr. Marshall resumed active practice of his 
profession at Harvard, 111., where he now resides, and will add to the 
distinction he has already attained for he is recognized as a lawyer of 
unusual ability and steadfast purpose. 



FRANK E. MARTIN. 



Frank E. Martin, proprietor of the Oak Wood Farm of McHenry 
Township, is one of the substantial men of the county, of which he is 
a native son, for he was born within two miles of his present home, in 
McHenry Township, January 18, 1864, a son of Peter L. and Wealthy 
A. (Tanner) Martin, natives of West Virginia and Ohio, respectively, 
who were married in Illinois. She was brought to Illinois in childhood 
by her father, Harvey Tanner, who located in McHenry Township, 
two miles west of the present farm of his grandson, Frank E. Martin. 
He died when the latter was fifteen years old, being then seventy-nine 
years of age. Peter L. Martin came to Greenwood Township with 
his parents, who died in that township. 

After his marriage, Peter L. Martin moved to Iowa, and from 1865 
to 1875 was engaged in farming in Cass County, that state. Upon his 
return to McHenry County in 1875, he secured the old Tanner home- 
stead of 200 acres, and continued to live there until his death on July 



HISTORY OF McIIENRY COUNTY 721 

28, 1907, at the age of sixty-nine years. His widow survives him and 
lives with a daughter at Woodstock. The old Tanner home has since 
been sold. The children of Peter L. Martin were as follows: Carrie B., 
who is Mrs. E. J. Mansfield of Woodstock. Frank E., whose name 
heads this review; Cora M., who married E. E. Bassett of McHenry, 
a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work; Edward L., who lives 
at Woodstock. 

Frank E. Martin was reared on the homestead, and attended the 
district schools, and the village school of Ringwood. On January 20, 
1887, when he was twenty-three years old, he was married to Abbie L. 
Whiting, and went to Chicago, and was engaged in railroad work for 
two and one-half years. Returning then to McHenry County he con- 
ducted his wife's father's farm on shares for four years, at the expiration 
of which time, Mr. Whiting gave his daughter 160 acres, which con- 
stitutes the present home of the Martins. 

On this farm Mr. Martin has erected a fine set of buildings, and has 
one of the finest r-ural homes in the county, his residence being equipped 
with steam heat, electric light and all modern improvements. This 
house was built in 1902, but has been further improved since that date. 
The barn, built in 1898, is equally modern, and fitted for dairy purposes, 
and he milks from twenty to twenty-five cows of the Holstein strain. 
A Republican, Mr. Martin has never cared to hold office. He belongs 
to the Masons and the Royal Neighbors, and Mrs. Martin is a member 
of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union, and the Red Cross. 
For some years Mr. Martin ran his own threshing outfit, but is now 
confining his efforts to farming. 

Freeman Whiting, the father of Mrs. Martin, was born January 
8, 1822, and he died September 13, 1915, his wife dying September 2G, 
1912. From 1880, Freeman Whiting lived on the second farm he owned 
which he bought from William Mead, renting his original farm. Mr. 
and Mrs. Whiting had the following children: Delbert A., who resides 
on a portion of his father's farm, married Ellen Dutton; Laura L., who 
married Richard Thompson, lives in Nunda Township, one and one- 
half miles south of McHenry; Lillian C, who is Mrs. C. W. Harrison, 
lives at North Crystal Lake, and Abbie who is Mrs. Frank E. Martin. 
Mr. and Mrs. Martin have two children, namely: Clinton E., and 
Loren O., both of whom are on the farm, now known as the Oak Wood 
Farm, which was originally the property of their grandfather, Freeman 
Whiting. Both the Martin and Whiting families are old and honored 
ones in McHenry County. 



722 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

FRED A. MAXON. 

Fred A. Maxon, one of the prosperous farmers of Dunham Township, 
is located five miles southwest of Harvard. He is a son of William 
J. and Jennie (Sinton) Maxon, he born in Rensselaer County, N. Y., 
December II, 1843, died January 11, 1017. He was married December 
4, 1867, having come to Illinois in 1804, after being twice rejected for 
service during the Civil War, and secured land in Dunham Township, 
which he cleared, building on it a log house, which he later replaced 
with the one now standing on the farm, for which he quarried the stone. 
A brother of his built a stone house on his farm about the same time. 
For eight years he served the township as assessor, and was a man of 
prominence in his community. His widow survives him and lives in 
the village of Chemung. Their children were as follows: Fred, whose 
name heads this review; Frank, who lives in Chemung Township; and 
Myrtle, who is Mrs. Harry Paul of Chemung Township. 

Fred Maxon was born June 29, 1871, and reared on his father's 
homestead, of which he took charge in 1896. Since then he has made a 
number of improvements, erecting a fine silo and outbuildings, and has 
brought his land into a high state of fertility. Specializing on dairying, 
he has from twelve to fifteen cows, and he also carries on general farming. 

On November 22, 1899, he was married to Clara Lee, a daughter of 
David and Mary (Craig) Lee, both natives of County Tyrone, Ireland, 
who came to the United States when young. They were married in 
McHenry County in 1868. Mr. Lee was a farmer of Dunham Town- 
ship, and their son, Charlie, has the old farm near the village of Chemung, 
both of them being deceased. Mrs. Maxon was born near her present 
home, April 14, 1876. Mr. and Mrs. Maxon have the following children: 
William, who is attending the Harvard High School; and David and 
Charles, all of whom are at home. The whole family belong to the 
.Methodist Episcopal Church of Chemung, in which they take an active 
part. Mr. Maxon not only belongs to an old and honored family of 
McHenry County, but he is an important factor in the agricultural 
life of his community, and he takes an interest in improving the roads 
and securing for this section all the advantages possible. 



EDWIN LEWIS McAULIFFE. 

Edwin Lewis McAuliffe, M. D., one of the leading men of Seneca 
Township, is prominent both as a physician and a farmer. He was 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 723 

born two and one-half miles west of his present farm in Seneca Township, 
September 20, 1856, a son of Jeremiah and Mary (O'Brien) McAuliffe, 
both born in County Limerick, Ireland. Not long after their marriage 
the parents came, during the early thirties, to the United States, and 
secured forty acres of land in Seneca Township, and after they had cut 
off the timber, sold that land and bought the farm now owned by William 
Henry, one mile west of the farm of Doctor McAuliffe, which was 160 
acres of timbered land lying on the Kishwaukee Creek. Later Jeremiah 
McAuliffe sold a part of this farm to his brother-in-law, James O'Brien, 
who with his brother Patrick, served as soldiers during the Civil War, 
the latter settling in Wisconsin. James O'Brien spent the remainder of 
his life on his farm, where he died at the age of seventy-five years. 
Jeremiah McAuliffe had a brother who served in the Confederate army 
during the same conflict. When he was about seventy-five years old, 
Jeremiah McAuliffe passed away, his widow surviving him until July 12, 
1896, when she died at the age of ninety-three years. Their children 
were as follows: Michael, who served as a member of the Eighth Illinois 
Cavalry throughout the Civil War, now lives at Milwaukee, Wis.; 
William H., who lives on the old homestead; Doctor McAuliffe, whose 
name heads this review; Alfred James, who went in young manhood to 
California, there died; Francis George, who died at the age of twenty-two 
years while studying medicine with his brother, Doctor McAuliffe; 
Winfield John, who went to California, but returned and three days later 
was drowned in Lake Geneva, and his companion, a young man, met the 
same fate; and Mary Louise, who is Mrs. John Chestnut, of Seneca 
Township. 

Edwin Lewis McAuliffe learned the saddler and harness making trade 
at Marengo and worked at it for four years, and at the same time read 
medicine, and then became a student at Rush Medical College, from 
which he was graduated in 1882, Dr. Arthur Bevan being one of his 
classmates. He was then an interne of Michael Reese Hospital, of 
Chicago, for two and one-half years. From then until 1896 he engaged 
in an active practice at Chicago, and was very successful. In the latter 
year he retired, and having in the meanwhile invested in 250 acres of 
land in McHenry County, has since then lived practically on his farm, 
which is one of the finest in this part of the state. Doctor McAuliffe 
has a tenant on his farm, but supervises its general conduct, specializing 
on dairying. He is still very much interested in medical matters, but 
while he has some office practice he prefers to devote his time to study. 
He is interested in the development of medical societies, of which at one 



724 HISTORY OK .M.IIK.NUV COUNTY 

time he was an important factor, being a delegate to the convention of 

the American Medical Association at St. Louis. Strictly a temperance 
man, lie is delighted with recent events with relation to prohibition, 
although in politics he has voted the Republican ticket. Always busy, 
he has found but little time for vacations. 

Doctor McAuliffe was married to Lillian Madden at Sarnia, Ontario, 
Canada, and they became the parents of the following children: Edwin, 
who died at the age of nineteen years; YVinfield Davenport, who was a 
mechanic in the shipyards at Hog Island, Pa., during the great war, is 
now in the Philippine Islands in Medical Corps of United States Service; 
Elmo Norton, who is assisting with the farm; Courtland Michael, who 
died August 10, 1920; and Aland, who is named for the Aland Island in 
the Baltic Sea. 

Doctor McAuliffe is intensely American, and is not willing to see 
any of the rights of the people compromised. Prior to the sinking of 
the Lusitania, he had seen much to admire in the Germans, but became 
convinced that as a monarchial nation they were a menace to humanity, 
and the progress of Christian civilization. 



daniel j. McCaffrey. 

Daniel J. McCaffrey, formerly pastor of the parish of the Church of 
the Sacred Heart of Marengo, is one of the scholarly men and beloved 
priests of the Roman Catholic church. He was born at Chicago, 111., 
September 15, 1866, one of the eleven children of James E. and Catherine 
M. (Dunn) McCaffrey. James E. McCaffrey was born in Ireland, 
but came to the United States in 1849, locating at Chicago, where he 
became prominent in the business world as a commission merchant 
and stock dealer. His death occurred June 24, 1884, his widow sur- 
viving him until April 23, 1899. 

Rev. Daniel J. McCaffrey attended Niagara University and was 
ordained to the priesthood in 1889 by Very Rev. Archbishop Patrick 
A. Feehan of Chicago. His first charge was in Chicago, w T here he was 
an assistant, and he was sent to Marengo, October 6, 1907. At present 
there are 110 families in the parish at Marengo. The affairs of the parish 
are in a very flourishing condition, and the present church edifice begun 
in May, 1908, was completed July 12, 1909, at a cost of §30,000. A 
hall was erected in connection with the church at a cost of 87,000. 



HISTORY OP McIIENRY COUNTY 725 

Father McCaffrey is a very efficient worker in his church, and the 
parish at Marengo increased in importance very materially, as well as 
spiritually, under his charge. His qualifications as a man and a citizen 
are such as to make him an important factor in his community, outside 
of his church as well as in it, and his advice has been sought and followed 
in many cases where sound judgment and a knowledge of human nature 
are needed to bring about a logical conclusion on public matters. 

Father McCaffrey is now located at Elburn, Kane County, Illinois. 



CHARLES McCLURE. 
Page 136. 

ABRAM B. McCONNELL. 

Abrain B. McConnell, now deceased, was formerly one of the success- 
ful agriculturalists of McHenry County, and a man who stood very 
high in public esteem. He was born in the original log cabin on his 
father's farm near Richmond, February 3, 1839, being the eldest son of 
the Hon. William A. and Elizabeth (Bodine) McConnell, natives of 
Pennsylvania, who were the earliest settlers of Richmond Township, 
coming here in 1837. 

Abram B. McConnell was reared in Richmond Township, and 
attended the schools of his district. From boyhood, he devoted himself 
to farming, receiving a practical training in the work from his father, 
and when he began farming on his own account, he located on a farm 
owned by his father, in the vicinity of Woodstock. He farmed here 
successfully until 1894, when his health failed and he built a home and 
moved to Woodstock in November, 1894. Abram B. McConnell was 
married February 28, 1861, to Harriet S. Potter, born in Washington 
County, N. Y., July 12, 1839, a daughter of Stephen A. and Charity 
(Barker) Potter, and they became the parents of the following children: 
Libby, deceased; Lena, deceased; Ida, Mrs. Arthur Southworth, of 
Willamette; William S.; Fred B., farming; and Roy, deceased. Abram B. 
McConnell died on February 15, 1895. His wife died September 20, 
1912. Like his father, William A. McConnell, Abram B. McConnell 
was devoted to the advancement of his community, and in his quiet, 
unostentatious way, did all in his power to bring about such a result. 



726 BISTORT OF McHENRY COUNTY 

FRANK B. McCONNELL. 

Frank B. McConnell, president of the State Hank of Richmond, is 
one of the sound, reliable and experienced men of McHenry County. 
He was horn in Richmond Township, March 29, 1875, one of the four 
children now living of his parents, George and Susan (Cushman) McCon- 
nell. George McConnell, who is now deceased, was one of the pioneer 
hankers of Richmond, and organized the hank known as the Bank of 
Richmond, in 1890. 

Frank B. McConnell attended the common and high schools of his 
locality and later the Northwestern University of Evanston and the 
Bryant & Stratton Business College of Chicago. In 1S95 he hecame con- 
nected with his father's hank, the Bank of Richmond, as bookkeeper 
and in 1902, was promoted to the position of cashier, which position he 
held until the reorganization of the Bank of Richmond into the State 
Bank of Richmond, which he promoted and accomplished January 1, 
1921, and became president of that corporation, which organized with 
a capital stock of §50,000. Mr. McConnell's long connection with the 
hanking husiness puts weight and strength back of the organization 
which is one of the stable financial institutions of the County. 

Mr. McConnell was married in 1897 to Miss Mae Dennison, a daugh- 
ter of Daniel Dennison, and a member of one of the old families of 
McHenry County. Mr. and Mrs. McConnell have four children, namely: 
Marjory L., Beatrice M., George D., and Frank B., Jr. The family all 
belong to the Methodist Episcopal church. Air. McConnell is a Repub- 
lican. A man of high principles, he has lived up to his ideals, and is 
held in proper esteem by all who know him. 



FRED B. McCONNELL. 

Fred B. McConnell, one of the prosperous farmers of Dorr Township, 
belongs to one of the most representative families of McHenry County, 
for its members have been associated with some of the best interests 
of this locality ever since the McConnells came here during the pioneer 
period of its history. Fred B. McConnell was born in the house he now 
occupies, April 9, 1874, and has devoted his useful life to agricultural 
labors. He has received more than ordinary educational advantages, 
for after he had been a student in the local schools, he took a course at 



HISTORY OP McIIENRY COUNTY 727 

the Northwestern University, at Evanston, 111. Returning to his 
father's farm, Fred B. McConnell assisted the latter in conducting it 
until 1897, when he took charge of the homestead, and operated the 
350 acres comprising it. When the farm was divided in 1907, Fred B. 
McConnell received 167 acres, on which was the old residence. Since 
then he has rebuilt and modernized it, and here he carries on general 
farming and dairying. For the past five or six years he has been a 
breeder of high-grade Holstein cattle. His buildings are equipped for 
dairy purposes. While his efforts are centralized on the farm, he is a 
stockholder and director of the State Bank of Woodstock, founded by 
his father, who continued on the directorate for many years. For 
twenty years Fred B. McConnell has been upon the school board. While 
in a general way he is a Republican, he does not feel bound down by any 
particular party ties, but reserves to himself the right to vote as his 
judgment dictates. 

On January 20, 1897, Mr. McConnell was united in marriage with 
Rose Barden, a daughter of John and Bessie (Coatman) Barden, who 
had come to McHenry County, from Nebraska, to which state they 
had been taken when young, and where they were married. Mr. and 
Mrs. Barden survive and live near their daughter, Mrs. McConnell. 
Mr. and Mrs. McConnell have the following living children: Bessie 
Harriet, who is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin and a business 
college; Abram Bodine, who attended the State University at Cham- 
pagne, Class 1919; and Ralph Allen, who is the youngest. Ida Marian, 
the fourth child, died in infancy. Mrs. McConnell belongs to the 
Royal Neighbors, and is active in the local improvement society. 

Mr. McConnelFs mother possessed considerable poetical talent, and 
a souvenir book of her poems has been published for the intimate 
family circle. These poems breathe the freshness of country, and indi- 
cate not only careful observation of nature's works, but bring out many 
of the moral lessons that are only to be found in contemplation of the 
Divine handiwork. 



george McConnell. 

George McConnell, now deceased, was a representative citizen and 
leading banker of McHenry County, where his memory is held in the 
highest veneration. He was born in Richmond Township, west of the 
village of Richmond, in the log cabin of his father, William A. McConnell, 



728 HISTORY OP McHENRY COUNTY 

March 3, 1845, being the youngesl son of three born to William and 
Elizabeth (Bodine) McConnell, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere 

in (his work. 

George McConnell attended the local schools and for a year was a 
student of Mt. Morris College. He was then engaged in educational 
work in Burton Township for a period. Following this he was engaged 
in operating the farm located south of the homestead, his father giving 
him his 250-acre farm, and he further improved it, and made it one of 
the most valuable in Richmond Township. 

In 1866 William A. McConnell erected a cheese factory at Rich- 
mond and George McConnell hauled the lumber used in its construction 
from Hebron and Genoa. It was a two-story building, 30x112 feet, and 
was the first of its kind erected in McIIcnry County. The first cheese 
made in it was manufactured May 18, 1866. The following year this 
factory manufactured 19,000 pounds more cheese than any other fac- 
tory in the county, several others having by this time come into exis- 
tence, or a total of 184,471 pounds. 

In 1890 George McConnell and his brother, John, organized a private 
bank at Richmond, of which he was president and his brother vice 
president, they associating with them John W. Haythorn as cashier. 
Later Frank B. McConnell, son of George McConnell, became cashier, 
and Charles D. McConnell, son of John McConnell, assistant cashier. 
This bank was known as the Bank of Richmond until it was reorganized 
into the State Bank of Richmond, January 1, 1921, with Frank B. 
McConnell as president. 

On November 15, 1865, George McConnell was married to Susan 
( ushman, a daughter of Darius and Mary Cushman, who was born in 
Vermont, May 26, 1847, and they became the parents of the following 
children: Cora II., who was born November 15, 1866; Mary May, who 
was born June 12, 1869; Agnes Leona, who was born January 24, 1873, 
died September 25, 1874; Frank Bodine, who was born March 29, 1875, 
a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work; Harry J., who was 
born July 16, 1879, died December 26, 1889; and William A., who was 
born July 25, 1881, a sketch of whom will be found elsewhere in this 
work. 

(Jeorge McConnell was a supervisor and justice of the peace for 
many years, and was also on the school board, which he served as chair- 
man for four years. He was a Mason and was treasurer of his lodge for 

a long period. On October 7, 1877, O ge McConnell and his wile 

united with the Methodist Episcopal church at Richmond, and he 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 729 

served it as a trustee and treasurer until his death. He and his brother 
John contributed one-half of the amount required for the erection of 
a new church edifice, and he built the present Methodist parsonage and 
gave it to the church. George McConnell died at Los Angeles, Cal., 
March 29, 1908, and in his passing Richmond, as well as all of McHenry 
County, lost one of the best of men and most loyal of citizens. 



JOHN McCONNELL. 



John McConnell, now deceased, was one of the influential men of 
McHenry County, and for years was connected as vice president with 
the Bank of Richmond, and the McConnell Cheese Factory, the latter, 
the first of its kind to be established in McHenry County. He was born 
1842, in the little log cabin on his father's farm, which served the family 
as a home for fifteen years, a son of William A. and Elizabeth (Bodine) 
McConnell, natives of Pennsylvania, a sketch of whom appears else- 
where in this work. 

Growing up in Richmond Township, John McConnell early dis- 
played those sterling traits of character which distinguished him through 
life, and was a favorite in the district schools and Mt. Morris Academy, 
which he attended. All of his life he was interested in agricultural 
matters, but in later years specialized on the conduct of the creamery 
established by his father, which he later bought. In 1890, he assisted 
in the establishment of the Bank of Richmond, and served it as vice 
president until his death, and he was also a director in the State Bank 
of Woodstock. In 1864, he went overland to California, and spent four 
years in that state, and then returned by the way of the Isthmus of 
Panama. Landing at New York City, he came thence to Richmond, 
where he rounded out his useful life, dying in 1900. 

In 1868, John McConnell was married to Mary Frothingham, and 
they became the parents of the following children: Bertha L. and 
Charles D. 



WILLIAM A. McCONNELL. 

Since the early days of McHenry County, the name of McConnell 
has been an important one in this region, and a number of its members 



730 HISTORY OK McHENRY COUNTY 

have been closely associated with the establishment and growth of its 

banking interests. One bearing this honored name is William A. McCon- 
nell, assistant cashier of the Bank of Richmond, who, with his brother, 
Prank B. McConnell, and sisters own the institution. William A. 
McConnell is the grandson and namesake of the late William A. McCon- 
nell, a sketch of whose life is to be found elsewhere in this work, together 
with that dl' ( leorge McCoimell, son of one and father of the other 
William A. Mc< lonnell. 

William A. McConnell, whose name heads this review, was born 
in McHenry County, July 25, 1881, a son of George and Susan (Cush- 
man) McConnell. and there were three others in the family of the 
parents. George McConnell, now deceased, was undoubtedly one of 
the distinguished men of the county', and a man to whom is due much 
of the constructive work of his day, especially in banking circles. He 
founded the Bank of Richmond, inaugurating the present policies and 
placing the institution upon a solid and reliable basis, his sons following 
the example of their father in its conduct after the}' assumed charge. 
The bank has a capital stock of §10,000 and a surplus of 847,000, and 
the cashier is Frank B. McConnell, William A. McConnell being as 
stated above, the assistant cashier. In addition to his banking interests, 
Mr. McConnell is the local representative for the Security Insurance 
Company of Connecticut, the Dubuque Fire Marine Insurance Com- 
pany, the Milwaukee Mechanic Insurance Company, and the American 
Security Company. 

On October 25, 1905, Mr. McConnell was united in marriage with 
Lena Gollman, a daughter of George J. Golhnan, and they have three 
children, namely: Fred W., Virginia E. and John A. The family are 
consistent members of the Congregational church, and give it an earnest 
and efficient support. Mr. McConnell is not only a supporter of Repub- 
lican principles and candidates, but his work in behalf of his community 
has been of so important a nature that he has been brought into public 
notice, and he was the successful candidate of his party for the office of 
village treasurer upon several occasions, bringing to bear upon the con- 
duct of the affairs of that office a ripened experience gained during his 
years of association with financial matters. He maintains his residence 
in the beautiful homestead of his family at Richmond. Mr. McConnell 
is a Mason, and his wife is a member of the Eastern Star. They are 
among the social leaders of their community, and a credit to their name 
and county. 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 731 

WILLIAM A. McCONNELL. 

William A. McConnell, now deceased, was one of the pioneers of 
McHenry County, became a heavy landowner of Richmond Township, 
and was intimately associated with its progress. He was born in Penn- 
sylvania, was there reared, and came to McHenry County in 1837. 
The first settler to locate a claim in Richmond Township, he secured 
one on section 8, on which he erected a log cabin, 10x18 feet- 
Having thus provided a home for his bride, Mr. McConnell returned 
to Pennsylvania, and was married there in 1838, to Elizabeth Bodine. 
Returning with his wife, Mr. McConnell began to improve his land. 
For fifteen years the primitive log cabin served as a home, but it was 
then replaced by a frame residence, located across the street' from the 
cabin. In 1872, a more commodious residence was erected on the site 
of the cabin, and there William McConnell died October 9, 1887, his 
wife passing away six months later. They were survived by three sons, 
namely: Abraham B., John and George, sketches of whom appear else- 
where in this work. 

William A. McConnell was one of the most influential men of his 
generation. During the administration of President Van Buren, he 
was appointed postmaster of Richmond, and served for six years, the 
post office being in the log cabin on his farm. He was associate judge 
of McHenry County for sixteen years and in 1844, he was elected county 
commissioner and served in that office until the adoption of township 
organization, when he was made a justice of the peace for Richmond 
Township and held that office for thirty-five years. He was appointed 
a judge of election in 1840 and served as such for several years. Mr. 
McConnell was a member of the first state legislature convened under 
the new constitution, and served as a member of the board of equali- 
zation one term, and as supervisor of Richmond Township for several 
years, and for one term was chairman of the board. He was a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, and was one of the organizers of 
the church of that denomination in Richmond. Not only did he serve 
faithfully and well in every office, but he reared his three sons to be 
as upright and capable as he, and they, too, have made their influence 
felt in the history of McHenry County, so that today the name of 
McConnell stands for the highest standards of American manhood and 
good citizenship. 



732 HISTORY OF Me II FN UY COUNTY 

WILLIAM S. McCONNELL. 

William S. McConnell, vice-president of the Woodstock State Bank, 
and owner of considerable McHenry County farm land, has long been 
one fif the leading residents of Woodstock, which he has served in 
several official capacities. He was born in McHenry ( !ounty, 111., August 
1, 1870, a son of Abram B. and Harriet S. (Potter) McConnell, who had 
six children, three of whom grew to maturity. Abram B. McConnell 
was born at Richmond, 111. He moved to Dorr Township in 18G2, and 
died February 13, 1905, in Woodstock. 

After going to the schools of his native county, McConnell attended 
the University of Michigan, and was graduated from its legal department 
in 1894 with the degree of LL. B., and was admitted to the bar soon 
thereafter. Since attaining to maturity, he has been interested in 
agricultural matters, and owns 300 acres of valuable land. A Republican, 
he has served as treasurer of McHenry County from 1906 to 1910, 
has been township supervisor, and in March, 1911, he was appointed by 
President Taft. postmaster of Woodstock, and held that office until 
November, 1915. On November, 1918, he was again elected County 
Treasurer. 

On June 15, 1897, Mr. McConnell was married to Miss Susan St. 
Clair, a daughter of Israel St. Clair, and they have six children, namely: 
Harold S., Margaret, John W., Robert, William S., Jr., and Mary. 
Harold S., who served during the Great War in the Thirty-third Division, 
enlisted on June 22, 1916, before he was eighteen years of age. He was 
honorably discharged April 25, 1919. Mr. McConnell and his family 
belong to the Methodist Episcopal church. He is a Mason, Odd Fellow 
and Elk, and is active in all these orders. Few men stand any higher 
in public esteem than does Mr. McConnell, and his success has been 
earned through honorable actions and praiseworthy industry. 



THEODORE B. McCORMICK. 

Rev. Theodore B. McCormick, administrator of St. Mary's Catholic 
Church at Huntley, was born in Philadelphia, Penn., October 1, 1865. 
He was graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1882, and 
from Niagara University in 1884, and was ordained in St. Vincent's 
Seminary, Germantown, Philadelphia, June 28, 1891. For some years 



HISTORY OF McHENEY COUNTY 733 

he was professor in St. John's College of Brooklyn, N. Y., and Niagara 
University. For four years he labored in the pine forests of New Jersey, 
Trenton Diocese, and then came to the Rockford Diocese, November 
17, 1909, where he continues to work in the smaller towns. 



REV. MARTIN J. McEVOY. 

Rev. Martin J. McEvoy, pastor of St. Patrick's parish, McHenry, 
and of St. Joseph's Catholic church of Richmond, is one of the scholarly 
men of his faith stationed in McHenry County. He was born at Joliet, 
111., April 12, 1880, one of the seven children of John and Johanna 
(Bolgar) McEvoy, the former of whom was also born at Joliet, and was 
a steam fitter by trade. He and his wife reside with their son at the 
parish house at McHenry. The paternal grandfather at one time served 
as circuit clerk of Will County, 111., and with his brothers built and 
managed the old woolen mill in Joliet, which supplied the government 
during the Civil War with army blankets and woolen cloth of all kinds. 
They were among the most prominent business men in Joliet in those 
days. The maternal great-grand-uncle was ordained a priest in 1817, 
and was the first priest of the Catholic faith to be so ordained in what 
was then the diocese of Boston. 

Rev. Father McEvoy attended the common and high schools of 
Joliet, and the Jesuit College at Chicago, from which he was graduated 
in 1902 with the degree of A. B. In September, 1902, he entered St. 
Mary's Seminary at Baltimore, Md., and a year later the degree of 
A. M. was conferred upon him by the Chicago College. In 1906 he was 
graduated from Saint Mary's Seminary with the degree of S. T. B., and 
he was ordained to the priesthood on December 15 of that year at the 
Holy Name Cathedral, Chicago, 111., by the Most Rev. James E. Quigley, 
Bishop of Chicago. Father McEvoy was first stationed as assistant 
priest at St. Mary's church at Rockford, 111., from whence he went to 
take charge of St. Peter's church at South Beloit, 111., leaving it for his 
present parish, August 1, 1915. The present church edifice was erected 
in 1865 at a cost of $8,000, and the affairs are in a flourishing condition. 
Plans are under way for the erection of a new church at an estimated 
cost of $75,000, W. B. Vander Mecr of Rockford, architect. Father 
McEvoy is a fourth degree member of the Knights of Columbus. 



734 HISTORY OP McHENBY COUNTY 

HENRY McLEAN. 

Page 136. 



JAMES E. McKAY. 



James E. McKay, one of the substantial business men of Algonquin, 
formerly owned and operated a machine shop, under the firm name of 
McKay & Kruschcl, but is now connected with the American Ironing 
Machine Company. Mr. McKay was born in Wyoming, on Decem- 
ber 27, 1878, a son of James F. and Minnie (Dahn) McKay, the former 
of whom is deceased. A sketch of James F. McKay appears elsewhere 
in this work. 

James E. McKay attended the common schools of his native place, 
and learned the trade of a blacksmith, following it until 1908, when he 
established his present business, conducting it alone until 1917, at which 
time he organized the firm of McKay & Kruschel. 

Mr. McKay was married to Miss Charlotte Danielson, a daughter 
of Frank Danielson. Mr. and Mrs. McKay have the following children: 
Lura, who was born in 1907; Frank D., who was born in 1910; and James 
E., who was born in 1912. Mr. McKay belongs to the Masonic order, the 
Woodmen of the World and the Royal Neighbors. In politics he is a 
Republican. Having a practical knowledge of his work, Air. McKay 
is able to render expert service, and his trade is a large one which shows 
a healthy annual increase. Several years ago Mr. McKay met with an 
automobile accident and his injuries were such as to forbid his continuing 
his heavy work, so he sold his interest in his machine shop and went with 
his present company. 



JAMES F. McKAY. 



James F. McKay, now deceased, formerly one of the honored resi- 
dents of Algonquin, was for many years engaged in operating a loco- 
motive as engineer, and was also president of the Algonquin Mutual 
Insurance Company. He was born in Scotland, November 29, 1845, 
and died at Algonquin, April 13, 1916. Coming to Algonquin in 1866, 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 735 

for the subsequent hall a century, he made that village his home with 
the exception of a period when he was a locomotive engineer on the 
Union Pacific Railroad, operating out of Laramie, Wyo. 

On October 16, 1874, Mr. McKay was married to Minnie Dahn, 
who survives him and lives on North Main Street, Algonquin. Mr. and 
Mrs. McKay became the parents of four children, three of whom survive, 
namely: Thomas and Andrew, both of whom live at Chicago, 111.; 
James Edward, who lives at Algonquin; and George, who died at Lara- 
mie, Wyo., in 1887. Mr. McKay left two sisters, namely: Mrs. 
Bart els, who lives at Woodstock; and Mrs. Brough, who lives at Chicago; 
and two brothers, Thomas and Andrew, both of whom live at Chicago. 
Mr. McKay belonged to Algonquin Camp No. 490, Modern Woodmen 
of America, and was an honorary member of the Brotherhood of Loco- 
motive Engineers. During the many years he served as engineer, Mr. 
McKay proved his worth, and was recognized as one of the most faithful 
and reliable men on the road. 



john f. Mclaughlin. 

John F. McLaughlin, manager of the Ringwood Branch of the 
Bowman Dairy Company, is one of the progressive business men of 
McHenry County. He was born in this county, in 1870, one of the 
eight children of Thomas McLaughlin and his wife. Thomas McLaugh- 
lin was born in Ireland, but came to the United States in young man- 
hood, locating in McHenry County, where he died in 1870. 

John F. McLaughlin was reared upon a farm, and attended the 
common and high schools of his locality. He was engaged in farming 
until he was eighteen years old, when he became interested in a milk 
and dairy products business, and in 1890 became connected with his 
present company, with which he rose until he is now in charge of its 
Ringwood plant, which has a daily capacity of 60,000 pounds of milk. 
The officers of the company are as follows: Johnston R. Bowman, 
president; D. B. Peck, vice-president; Robert A. Bowman, treasurer; 
and E. M. Bowman, secretary. The main offices of the company are 
at Nos. 140-158 W. Ontario Street, Chicago, 111. The Ringwood plant 
gives employment to twenty-seven people. It was organized in 1907, 
when the Bowman Dairy Company bought the co-operative Farmers' 
Company. 



736 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

In 1904, Mr. McLaughlin was married to Miss Julia A. Noble, a 
daughter of Major Noble, ami a member of one of the oldest families 
of McHenry County. Mr. and Mrs. Laughlin have had (wo daughters: 

Mary, who died aged four years, and Julia E., who was horn January 
20, 1913. Mr. McLaughlin is a Catholic. He is a Democrat hut has 
never entered public life, confining his efforts in that direction to giving 
his hearty and unqualified support to all measures calculated to prove 
beneficial to his community. 



HENRY McMILLAX. 



Henry McMillan, one of the native sons of McHenry County, and 
a successful farmer of Nunda Township, was horn on the old McMillan 
farm, in Nunda Township, just east of the one he now owns, March 21, 
1882. His father, Andrew T. McMillan, was also born in Nunda Town- 
ship, a son of Samuel McMillan. Samuel McMillan was born in the 
state of New York, where he was married to Jane Ann Wilson, and in 
1836 they came to Illinois, settling in Nunda Township, and entering 
160 acres of land. There they both died. 

Andrew T. McMillan was reared in Nunda Township, where he 
was married to Marian A. Wicker, a native of Vermont, a daughter of 
Benjamin Wicker. They had the following children: Emma, Charles 
and Benny, deceased; Henry, Frank Ray; and Earl. Andrew T. Mc- 
Millan was a farmer and owned eighty acres of land, on which Henry 
McMillan now lives, and sixty-eight acres across the road which was the 
homestead. He was a Republican, but not active in politics. His death 
occurred when he was sixty-eight years old. 

Henry McMillan attended the district schools and learned to be a 
practical farmer under his father's instruction. On July 2, 1903, Mr. 
McMillan was married to Bessie C. Hoffman, who died May 29, 1916, 
leaving her family desolate, for hers was a noble, Christian character, 
and she was beloved by them and the whole neighborhood. Mr. and 
Mrs. McMillan had the following children: Eva and Neva, twins; 
Mark; Glenn; Vera and Nellie, all of whom are at home. Mr. McMillan 
belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America, and his wife belonged to 
the Royal Neighbors. 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 737 

CYRUS L. MEAD. 

Cyrus L. Mead, now deceased, was one of the retired farmers of 
Hebron, and at his death, owned a fine farm of eighty-six acres of 'and 
within the corporate limits of the city. At one time he was prominent 
in the agricultural circles of the county. He was born in Oswego Coun- 
ty, N. Y, August 13, 1827, one of the ten children of Jeremiah and 
Anna (Cline) Mead. Jeremiah Mead was born in Massachusetts, but 
moved to Oswego County, N. Y. in 1814, and lived there until his 
death in the early seventies, being engaged all of his active life in farming. 

Cyrus L. Mead moved to Wayne County, N. Y., in 1848, and from 
there to McHcnry County, 111., in 1853, and unt 1 his retirement in 
1882, was actively engaged in cultivating his farm land. He was a 
Republican, and served as a member of the school board for twenty-two 
years, and for five years was a member of the board of commissioners. 

January 25, 1856, Mr. Mead was married to Miss Finette A. Carmen, 
a daughter of Sidney Carmen of New York, a Quaker in his religious 
belief. Mr. and Mrs. Mead had five children, namely: Anna A., who is 
mentioned below; Charles, Henry, Darwin and Luella, all of whom are 
deceased. 

Anna C. Mead was married first to George P. Goddard, who is 
deceased, and they had a son, Henry A., who was born August 10, 1880, 
and died January 6, 1918, having married in 1910, Miss Nellie Peele, 
who bore him a son, Henry A. Goddard. Mrs. Anna C. Goddard was 
later married to Ellis F. Hewes who was born in Cook County, 111., 
July 12, 1851. Henry Mead, son of Cyrus L. Mead, married Mary 
McCau'ey and had one daughter, Luella A. Mead, and she married 
Harry Behnke, now deceased, and they had one daughter, Luella M. 
Behnke. The Mead and Hewes families belong to the Methodist Epis- 
copal church, and are well known in it and in other circles throughout 
the county, where Mr. Mead was recognized as one of the most repre- 
sentative of its pioneers. During his long residence here he saw many 
changes take place, and bore his part in many of them, his influence 
being always directed toward those which promised to prove beneficial 
to his community. 

Cyrus L. Mead died May 8, 1920, after an illness of five months, 
his daughter, Mrs. Anna C. Hewes, caring for him. He was buried in 
the Hebron Cemetery beside his wife and children. The daughter 
retains the house in which he died, which is on the site of the original 
farm house. 



738 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

EDWIN A. MEAD. 

Edwin A. Mead, D. D. S., one of the leading dental surgeons of 
McHenry County, is conducting a general practice at Hebron, but draws 
his patronage from all parts of the county. He was born at Richmond, 
111., June 15, 1877, one of the six children of Isaac N. and Marie (Benson) 
Mead. Isaac M. Mead was born in New York state, but came to 
McHenry County in 1840, and located in Richmond, where he followed 
farming until his retirement, at which time he moved to Janesville, Wis., 
and is still residing there. During the Civil War, he served in the 
Union army for four years. 

Doctor Mead attended the schools of Janesville, Wis., and then 
entered the College of Dental Surgery at Chicago, from which he was 
graduated in 1901. Immediately thereafter, he established himself in 
practice at Genoa Junction, where he remained a year, and then came 
to Hebron, and finding conditions to suit him, has since remained, build- 
ing up a very desirable trade. Doctor Mead owns the building in which 
his office is located, and which bears his name, he having erected it at a 
cost of $10,000, and he owns his residence at Hebron, and a summer 
home at Lake Geneva. His office is equipped with all modern appli- 
ances for the proper conduct of his work. For a period of five years, 
Doctor Mead served Hebron as postmaster, and also as a member of the 
village board, and he is a leader in the Republican party. In 1903, 
Doctor Mead was united in marriage with Miss Lora C. Hyde, a daugh- 
ter of William Hyde, and a member of a prominent family of Hebron. 
Doctor and Mrs. Mead are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
A Mason, Doctor Mead belongs to both the Blue Lodge and Chapter 
of that order. An excellent citizen, Doctor Mead has lived up to the 
highest conceptions of American manhood, and is recognized as a very 
valuable adjunct to his community. 



OWEN G. MEAD. 



Owen G. Mead, senior member of the popular grocery establishment 
of Mead & Charles, of Woodstock, is one of the city's enterprising busi- 
ness men, and a director of the Farmers' Exchange State Bank of Wood- 
stock. He was born at Woodstock, September 4, 1865, one of the five 
children of Charles and Rosina (Woodard) Mead, the former of whom 
was a carpenter and responsible man of Woodstock, who died in 1893. 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 739 

Owen G. Mead attended the common and high schools of Woodstock, 
and his first business experience was gained as a clerk. For ten years 
he was engaged with several firms at Woodstock, and then in 1897, he 
formed his present partnership, and established the business, the firm 
has since continued. A full and complete line of fancy and staple 
groceries, to the amount of $12,000, is carried, and a very large annual 
business is done. In 1900, Mr. Mead was married to Miss Ida Eppel, 
a daughter of Frederick Eppel. Mr. and Mrs. Mead became the parents 
of twin sons, Fred L. and Edwin C, who were born in September, 
1903. The family residence is at No. 446 Judd street, Woodstock. 
Mr. Mead is a Mason and also belongs to the Odd Fellows and Modern 
Woodmen of the America. His social connections are with the County 
and Golf clubs. Not only did he serve as a member of the school board, 
but he has also been town clerk of Woodstock, and has been very capable 
in both offices. In 1915 he was made a director of the Farmers' Exchange 
State Bank of Woodstock, one of the sound financial institutions of the 
county. Mr. Mead and his family belong to the Presbyterian church, 
and he is prominent in it, as he is in every organization with which 
he is connected. 



LUNA E. MENTCH. 



Luna E. Mentch, of Gary, has had more to do with the political life 
and business activity of Gary than any other one man, being almost 
continuously in an official position of one kind or another, and at times 
filling several. For fourteen years he has been the local banker, and for 
twenty-eight years, proprietor of the flourishing pickle factory of this 
place. 

Mr. Mentch was born at Oshkosh, Wis., in 1860, a son of Jacob and 
Sarah (James) Mentch, natives of Germany and Holland. The parents 
were married at Algonquin, to which she had come from New York 
when sixteen years old, with Silas Jaynes and family. The Jaynes 
family was one of the early ones to settle in Algonquin Township, its 
members becoming heavy landowners. Silas Jaynes continued to live 
here until 1900, when he moved to Barrington, and died when nearly 
ninety. Sarah James continued to live in the Jaynes family until her 
marriage. Jacob Mentch had come from Germany to the United States 
in young manhood, first settling at Cuba, Kane County, 111., and worked 
on a farm there and in McHenry County until his marriage, which 



740 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

took place December 20, 1848, the ceremony being performed by Rev. 
W. E. Manley. Following his marriage, Mr. Mentch went to Oshkosh, 
\Yis., and there enlisted in response to President Lincoln's first call for 
troops for the Civil War, in 1861, under Captain Sawyer, later United 
States senator from Wisconsin. He was honorably discharged a year 
later on account of disability, and returning home died three months 
later from disability incurred in the service, leaving a widow and seven 
children. She remained at Oshkosh, Wis., for a year, and then returned 
to Algonquin Township. 

This brave mother kept her family together, with the exception of 
the eldest, who struck out for himself, and supported them by working 
among the families of Algonquin Township. These children were as 
follows: Morania, who served in the Civil War, enlisting from Wisconsin, 
later became a marine engineer on the Great Lakes, and died at the 
age of forty-five years; Abraham, who was also a marine engineer on 
the Great Lakes, died at Oshkosh, Wis., in 1916, aged forty-eight years; 
George, who died in young manhood; Isaac, who lives at Woodstock; 
Hiram, who left McHenry County twenty-five years ago, died at Chi- 
cago, where he was a merchant; Luna E., whose name appears at the 
head of this review; and Lineys, who is foreman of the foundry] depart- 
ment of the James A. Brady Foundry Company of Chicago. The de- 
voted mother of this family spent her last days at the home of her 
son Lineys at Chicago, where she died when fifty-two years old, deeply 
mourned by the family for whom she had done so much. 

When Luna E. Mentch was eleven years old he went to live in the 
family of G. S. Frary and remained there until after he reached his 
majority, during that period attending the district school and the 
Dundee High School. Subsequently he took a teacher's course at the 
Illinois State Normal School at DeKalb, 111., and was engaged in teach- 
ing for twelve years, first in the country schools, and later at Gary and 
Crystal Lake, and was very successful in the educational field, never 
lacking a school, and when he abandoned that calling, his action caused 
regret, for parents knew that under his capable and inspiring care their 
children were certain to develop in no slight degree. 

Mr. Mentch was not satisfied with the opportunities of the school- 
room, and branched out into a commercial life, and his success has 
proven that he was right in taking this step. He opened the first meat 
market at Cary in 1880, at a time when there were only five or six 
houses in the place, his first location being in a small building east of 
the post office, now used as a paint shop, aad-eenducted it for two years, 



HISTORY OF McIIENRY COUNTY 741 

when he disposed of it to M. B. Weaver. Beginning to handle realty, 
Mr. Mentch opened a real-estate office, and secured the agency of some 
of the leading insurance companies. In 1900 he opened the first bank 
of Cary, known as the Gary Exchange Bank, in the store now occupied 
by Hubka Bros., later on erecting the present bank building. When 
the Carey State Bank was organized, Mr. Mentch liquidated the Ex- 
change Bank, selling his building to the new institution, and devoting 
his time and attention to his real-estate and insurance business, which 
had assumed large proportions. Later he diverted some of his attention 
to his pickle factory, which he had bought in 1889 from Goodwin & 
Frary. Mr. Mentch has handled a large amount of real estate, both 
rural and city, and at times owned several farms, operated for him by 
tenants. In the village of Cary he has erected more than one building, 
which he later sold at a good figure. 

A man of unusual capabilities, Mr. Mentch has always taken a 
very active part in civic affairs, being active in bringing about the incor- 
poration of the village of Cary, January 9, 1893, was its first president, 
and was re-elected to that office. Later he served in the same capacity 
for two terms more. For sixteen years he was supervisor of Algonquin 
Township, and for three years of that period presided over the board. 
For one term he was township collector, and member of the county 
board of review for four years. For thirty years he has been a member 
of the school board, his experience as an educator making his services 
of special value. He was village treasurer for two terms, served for 
the same length of time as police magistrate and is now a justice of 
the peace. 

When Mr. Mentch was twenty-three years old he was married to 
Lila Kendrew of Algonquin Township, a daughter of William and 
Ellen Kendrew, farming people of Algonquin Township, both of whom 
are deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Mentch have two children, namely: Vera, 
who married Charles T. Allen, assistant states attorney; a sketch of 
whom appears elsewhere in this work, has two children, Russell and 
Robert Allen; and Foy L., who is proprietor of the Cary Garage, married 
Pearl Lindsey, and has one son, Elburn. Mr. Mentch is an Odd Fellow, 
and has been very active in the local lodge for a quarter of a century, 
and for nine times has been sent by his lodge as a representative to 
the Grand Lodge. He is also a Mason, belonging to Crystal Lake Lodge, 
A. F. & A. M.; Woodstock Chapter, R. A. M.; Woodstock Commandery, 
K. T., and Medinah Temple, Mystic Shrine, of Chicago. Mr. Mentch 
is one of the most representative men of McHenry County, and his 



742 HISTORY OF McIIENRY COUNTY 

remarkable success in life has come entirely through his own efforts 
as he is decidedly a self-made man. 



MELVILLE W. MERRY. 

Melville W. Merry, proprietor of the Nyal Store at Hebron, is one 
of the leading druggists of that city and is a director of the Bank of 
Hebron. He was born in this county, January 6, 1862, one of the five 
children of Waterman S. and Pleiades (Wilkinson) Merry. Waterman 
S. Merry was born in New York state, but came to Mclienry County, 
where he was extensively engaged in farming, and where he lived until 
his death. 

Melville W. Merry attended the Harvard High School and the 
Aurora Business College, after which he became a clerk in the drug 
store of Gresbeck & Wilkinson of Harvard, with whom he remained 
for ten years, and then in 1885, he located at Hebron, where he has 
since remained. He carries a full and varied stock of drugs, books and 
jewelry amounting to $20,000, and he owns the building in which his 
store is located. In 1916, Mr. Merry became a director of the Bank 
of Hebron, and still maintains that connection. He is secretary of the 
Milk Producers Association of Hebron. During the administration of 
Presidents Roosevelt and Taft, Mr. Merry served as postmaster of 
Hebron, receiving his last appointment, August 28, 1907, and he is a 
staunch Republican. He was also interested in farming for ten years, 
and still owns 400 acres of land in Hebron Township. Fraternally he 
belongs to the Masons, Odd Fellows and Woodmen of the World. 

In 1888, Mr. Merry was united in marriage with Miss Emma C. 
Mead, a daughter of Henry W. Mead. Mr. and Mrs. Merry have three 
children, namely: Nina A., who is a graduate of Lake Forest University, 
is at home; Clifton H., who was born February 13, 1892, was grad- 
uated from the Northwestern University in 1916, enlisted September 4, 
1917 in Company F, Three Hundred and Forty-second Infantry, was 
mustered out of the service December 16, 1918, and is now serving as 
assistant cashier of the Bank of Hebron; and Celia F., who is attending 
the Northwestern University. Mr. Merry has been active in many 
movements at Hebron, and is recognized as one of its most prominent 
and influential citizens. 




CHARLES H. TRYOX 



'if 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 743 

EDWARD W. MEYER. 

Edward W. Meyer, one of the leading business men of Cary, is held 
in high esteem by the people of McHenry County. He was born at 
Desplaines, 111., May 3, 1889, one of the four children of Edward J. and 
Augusta (Geils) Meyer. Edward J. Meyer was born at Albany, N. Y., 
but came to Des Plaines, 111., at an early day, is now retired and lives 
at Crystal Lake. His wife died in 1905. 

Edward W. Meyer attended Maine Township High School, and the 
Northwestern College of Pharmacy. In 1912, he opened his present 
drug store, and gave it his personal attention until June 10, 1918, when 
he was made assistant cashier of the Cary State Bank. Almost imme- 
diately thereafter, he was called upon to discharge the duties of cashier. 
While serving in the latter capacity he went into the government service 
as a soldier. 

In 1916, Mr. Meyer was married to Miss Fern Hutchinson, a daugh- 
ter of Chester Hutchinson of Barrington, 111., and they have a daughter, 
Marjorie. Mr. Meyer is a Mason and Odd Fellow. In politics, he is a 
Republican. He and his wife belong to the Methodist Episcopal church. 
Both as a druggist and banker, Mr. Meyer has proven his worth and 
capability, and he is perhaps as well known throughout the country as 
any man now living in it. 



CHARLES C. MILLER, M. D. 

Charles C. Miller, M. D., is one of the residents of Marengo who 
has attained to a world-wide reputation as a writer upon subjects of 
interest to apiarists, and as a naturalist of more than average ability. 
Doctor Miller was born in Pennsylvania, June 10, 1831, and his father, 
Johnson J. Miller, was a member of the medical profession. The mother 
of Charles C. Miller bore the maiden name of Phebe Roadman. 

After securing his degree of A. B. from Union College of Schenectady, 
N. Y., Doctor Miller studied medicine in the University of Michigan, 
being graduated therefrom in 1856, and for a time was engaged in the 
practice of his profession. In 1861 his lifelong interest in bees found 
expression with his entrance into the bee industry at Marengo, and he 
increased his business until at one time he had over 400 colonies. Carry- 
ing on his work in a scientific manner, he made experiments which were 



744 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

of such value that his constructive contributions to bee journals met 
with instant attention, and he was thus encouraged to place the results 
of his observation in book form. Since 1S94 he has conducted a depart- 
ment of questions and answers in the American Bee Journal and has 
been department editor of Gleanings in Bee Culture since 1890; and is 
a member of the National Beekeepers Association, which he twice 
served as president. He also is the author of "A Book by P. Benson, 
Sr.," "A Year Among the Bees," "Fifty Years Among the Bees," and is 
editor of the apiary terms in the Standard Dictionary. For many years 
he was secretary and later president of the Mc Henry County Sunday 
School Association, and president of the Second District of Illinois, 
comprising six counties. He has been an elder in the Presbyterian 
church for more than sixty years. Doctor Miller has also been head 
of the local Sunday school, and chairman of the Synodical committee 
for the Synod of Illinois for several years. He attended the conven- 
tion of the International Association of Sunday School Work held at 
St. Louis, and was a delegate to the General Assembly of the Presby- 
terian church at Saratoga Springs. 

In the line of his bee industry, Doctor Miller produced honey for 
the market and took first premium at the World's Fair in 1893. At 
the convention of Bee Keepers at Chicago in February, 1919, he was 
hailed by Dr. E. F. Phillips, head of the Government Department of 
Bee Keeping, at his appearance before the convention, as the "greatest 
bee keeper in the world." 

On August 12, 1857, Doctor Miller was united in marriage with 
Mrs. Helen M. White, of Marengo, who died in 1880. On November 
15, 1881, Doctor Miller was married (second) to Miss Sidney J. Wilson, 
of Marengo. Doctor Miller has one son, Charles Clinton Miller, who 
is a clerk in the adjutant-general's office, in the War Department at 
Washington, D. C. At the outbreak of the Spanish-American War he 
resigned to serve in that campaign, but resumed the duties connected 
with his position after peace was declared. 

Doctor Miller has endeavored to interest others in growing flowers, 
especially the gladioli, and has sought to have instruction relative to 
its culture introduced in the public schools. He is a member of the 
National Plant and Flower Guild, which arranges with express com- 
panies to carry flowers for distribution in the slums of cities. As is but 
natural in a man of his mentality and inclinations, Doctor Miller has 
always been a strong advocate of the Prohibition movement, and no 
one is better satisfied than he at the successful passage and ratification 
of the Prohibition Amendment. 






HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 745 

* 

JOHN C. MILLER. 

John C. Miller, proprietor of the Princess Theatre, is one of the most 
representative men of this part of the country. He was born on a farm 
near Dundee, in Kane County, 111., February 14, 1879, a son of John 
and Rachel (Salow) Miller, who had seven children, six of whom survive. 
The parents were born in Germany, but came to the United States in 
1871, and located in Kane County, 111. The father died in September, 
1916, but the mother survives and lives at Marengo. 

John C. Miller attended the common schools of his native county, 
and early in life lived with his parents on a farm, but on March 19, 1907, 
came to Woodstock, 111., and was employed in the Oliver Typewriter 
Co., and on February 1, 1909, engaged in the motion picture exhibition 
business. He is a staunch Republican, and was elected alderman from 
the third ward in 1917. 

Mr. Miller was united in marriage on June 4, 1902, with Miss Lena 
Trebes, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Trebes, and they have one 
daughter, Helen L., who was born June 18, 1905. The family belong to 
the Grace Lutheran Church. Mr. Miller is a member of the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks, the Loyal Order of Moose, and the Country 
Club, and is the vice-president and a director of the Commercial and 
Community Club. He is a man widely known and is justly popular. 



JOHN F. MILLER. 



John F. Miller, proprietor of the Rosedale Greenhouses of McHenry, 
is a native of Denmark, where he was born August 26, 1876, and learned 
the business in which he has always been engaged. In 1896 he came 
to the United States and spent three years at Morton Grove with the 
Pullman Company, and then came to McHenry and rented his present 
property for a year. The greenhouses were established in 1903, and are 
located on the Fox River adjoining the village of McHenry. There are 
nine and one-half acres of land surrounding the houses, which are in 
the highest state of fertility. Mr. Miller has 40,000 feet of glass, and 
his houses are heated by a steam plant. While in Denmark his specialty 
was rose growing, but he finds that here there is a greater demand for 
carnations, chrysanthemums and sweet peas, which he sells at wholesale 
in Chicago. When he took over this business he and his wife had between 



746 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

them just 81,000, which they paid down, and went into debt for the 
remaining $13,000. In the years which have followed they have done 
so well that they have cleared off this debt and made many improve- 
ments, having one of the finest plants of its kind in this part of the state. 
Mr. Miller was married to Minnie Stevensen, also born in Denmark, 
but a resident of New Y'ork for some years prior to her marriage. They 
have two children, namely: Alice Rose and Theodore S., both of whom 
are at home. Mr. Miller belongs to McHenry Lodge, A. F. & A. M., 
and Woodstock Chapter, R. A. M., and both belong to the Eastern 
Star, in which Mrs. Miller is an official. They have succeeded beyond 
all expectations, but theirs has not been an easy way. They were 
only able to meet their obligations and get ahead, because they were 
willing to work early and late, and save every penny not needed for the 
absolute necessities of life. As a result of this industry and thrift, 
they have today a fine business and are numbered among the prosperous 
people of their locality, in which they are highly appreciated and 
respected. 



ANDREW MORITZ. 



Andrew Moritz, one of the thrifty and prosperous agriculturalists 
of McHenry County, is located on his farm five miles north of Union 
in Seneca Township. He was born in Hanover, Germany, April 1, 
1855, and reared on a farm. In 1880 he came to the United States, 
landing in New York City, from whence he came to Illinois and for a 
time worked by the month, for farmers in Du Page County, and then 
in 1881 located in Coral Township. In 1883 he bought his present farm 
of 140 acres for which he paid $50 per acre, and on it he erected all the 
buildings, and has now a very valuable property. He has always been 
a hard worker and is regarded as one of the first-class farmers of the 
township. Independent in his political views, he votes for the man 
he thinks best fitted for the office. 

In 18S2 Mr. Moritz was married in Seneca Township to Marie 
Dunker. She is a daughter of Henry and Dora Dunker, all born in 
Hanover, Germany, who came to the United States in 1876, and settled 
in Coral Township. Mr. Dunker died when seventy years old. His 
widow survives him and is living at Marengo, being now a very aged 
lady. Mr. and Mrs. Moritz became the parents of the following chil- 
dren: Christ, who is a rancher of Montana; Dora, who is at home; 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 747 

Treda, who lives at Delavan, Wis. ; Louis, who is living on a portion of 
his father's farm; Henry, who is a partner of Louis, was in France as 
a member of the Twenty-first Engineers, being sent over in October, 
1918; Mina, who also lives at Delavan, Wis.; Charlotte, who has been 
teaching in Seneca Township for six years, lives at home; Elizabeth, 
who has been teaching for two years, also lives at home; George, who 
is also on the homestead; and Carl and Mary, both of whom are at home. 
Mr. and Mrs. Moritz and their children belong to the German 
Evangelical church at Union, and Mr. Moritz is a generous supporter 
of its good work. They are very estimable people, and have the esteem 
of their neighbors. 



WILLIAM MUNSHAW. 



William Munshaw, a representative man, has been for years one of 
the substantial farmers of McHenry County, and owns and operates 
together with his brother, Lambert, a fine farm in Algonquin Township, 
three miles southeast of Crystal Lake and three miles north of Algon- 
quin. He was born on this farm, October 24, 1871, a son of William 
and Maria (Wiles) Munshaw. The elder William Munshaw was born 
March 16, 1817, in Ontario, Canada, where he was married, and where 
four of his children were born. In 1869, he came to McHenry County, 
111., and buying 102 acres of land in Algonquin Township, located in 
the oak openings, and here he died July 24, 1888, aged seventy-one 
years. His widow survived him for fifteen years, dying at Crystal 
Lake. She was much younger than he. In addition to his farm in 
Algonquin Township, he owned another one near Crystal Lake, but 
made his first one his home, and lived in the house now standing on it. 
His life was devoted to general farming and he had no taste for politics, 
although he voted the Republican ticket. 

A brother of the elder William Munshaw, John Munshaw, who was 
born in Ontario, Canada, June 24, 1818, came to McHenry County, 
111., in 1871, and died here August 28, 1891, aged seventy-three years. 
His children were as follows: Mrs. D. E. Green, who lives at Lincoln, 
Neb.; Mrs. Fayette Thomas, who lives at Crystal Lake, III.; Mrs. Z. 
B. Udall, who lives at Columbus, Neb.; Miss Louise, who lives at Elgin, 
111.; E. D., who lives at Evanston, Wyo.; T. A., who lives at Elgin, 111.; 
and F. A., who lives at Eau Claire, Wis. 

William Munshaw and his wife had the following children: Louise, 



748 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

who is Mrs. William Huffman, lives at Crystal Lake; Anna, who is 
Mrs. Fred Goodman, lives al Crystal Lake; Carrie and Sophronia, who 
do not live in McHenry County; John Robert, who died when about 
fifty years old, left three children, Hazel, Jennie and Ralph; William, 
whose name heads this review; and Lambert, who is a chemist in the 
Terra Cotta Works, is in partnership with William, in the ownership 
of the old home, which William operates, and where Lambert also lives. 

William Munshaw, the younger, attended the local schools, and 
remained at home until his father's death, and in addition to farming, 
learned the blacksmithing trade at Carey, and then ran a blacksmith] ng 
shop of his own for eleven years. For the subsequent one year he 
was with the Oliver Typewriter Company at Woodstock, and then in 
1907, took charge of the farm, in partnership with his brother, Lambert. 
They have bought the interests of the other heirs, and operate the 
farm under the style of Munshaw Bros., general farmers, stockraisers 
and dairymen. Each year Mr. Munshaw grows and fattens a fine drove 
of Duroc swine of pure breed, and his herd of twenty-five cows are of 
a high-grade Holstein strain. The farm is well drained naturally, and 
all of it is under cultivation. The basement of the barn is used for 
stabling purposes, and the equipment is thoroughly modern. 

Lambert Munshaw was married to Myrtle Prickett, but William 
Munshaw is unmarried. Lambert Munshaw attended the schools of 
Crystal Lake, and for the past fifteen years has been the chemist of the 
Terra Cotta Works at Terra Cotta, this county. These young men are 
typical of the best class of McHenry people. They were born on their 
present farm, and have spent their lives within the confines of their 
native county, so that their interests are centered here and they take 
great pride in its development, and are favorably inclined toward all 
movements looking to further advancement of their locality. 



GEORGE L. MURPHY. 



George L. Murphy, president of the American National Bank of 
Woodstock, and senior member of the well-known mercantile house of 
Murphy & Doering, of Woodstock, is one of the leading business men 
of McHenry County. He was born at Woodstock, November 19, 1878, 
a son of John J. and Elizabeth A. (Donnelly) Murphy, being one of 
seven children, of whom four survive. 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 749 

After attending; the schools of Woodstock and the University of 
Chicago, Mr. Murphy returned to Woodstock, and formed a partnership 
in the mercantile business, under the style of Murphy & Mullen, which 
firm was in 1910 succeeded by the firm of Murphy & Doering, which 
now controls a large and profitable trade. In 1901 Mr. Murphy 
embarked in the banking business, and in 1903 was made president 
of his present bank, it being then organized by some of the leading 
men of the county. This bank is one of the most substantial in this 
section, and under Mr. Murphy's sane and conservative policies, it is 
in a most excellent condition, and largely patronized. Mr. Murphy is 
deeply interested in agriculture and is one of the largest owners of farm 
land in McHenry County. 

In 1906 Mr. Murphy was married to Miss Gabriella Casamave, 
a daughter of Francis D. Casamave, formerly chief engineer of the 
motive department of the Pennsylvania Railroad System. Mr. and 
Mrs. Murphy have three children, namely: John J., Elizabeth C. and 
Frances Delphine. The family all belong to the Catholic church, and 
he is a member of the Knights of Columbus Council of his parish. In 
politics Mr. Murphy is a Republican, but he has not entered public 
life, his time and attention being fully occupied with his private affairs. 



JOHN J. MURPHY. 



John J. Murphy was long one of Woodstock's leading bankers and 
business men, and this was but one phase of a busy life that reached 
out in continuous usefulness and sympathy to all with whom he came 
in contact. He always judged his fellowmen not by wealth, birth or 
position, but by innate worth of character, and himself measured by 
this standard, shows a record which places him high on the roll of 
Woodstock's most valued and honored citizens. He was seventy-six 
years of age when he passed away, for his birth occurred in County 
Cork, Ireland, on May 8, 1832. His parents, Edward and Elizabeth 
(Healey) Murphy, were also natives of that county and the father 
there followed the occupation of farming until about 1838, when he 
brought his family to the United States, settling in New York city, 
where he was employed as an overseer in an oil mill and there remained 
until about 1844, when he came to Illinois, taking up his abode on 
a farm in Hartland Township, McHenry County, there remaining until 



750 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

the death of his wife, about 18G2. The father afterward removed to 
Woodstock, where he spent his remaining days in retirement from 
business, "living with his daughter until his death in 1884, when he 
was in his eighty-fourth year. In the family were seven children. 

John J. Murphy, the third in order of birth, attended a brothers' 
school in New York. He was reared in the faith of the Roman Catholic 
church, to which he always adhered, and he was liberal in his views 
and did not seek to influence the opinions of others on religious matters. 
In his boyhood days he was studious and was well posted even in his 
youth on current events. He ever remained a well-informed man, 
capable of discussing intelligently the vital problems and questions of 
the day. 

When fourteen years of age he went to Chicago, where he clerked 
in a general store and also attended night school. In 1850, when 
eighteen years of age, he went overland to California and was engaged 
in mining near Sacramento and at Hangtown, now Placerville. He 
opened the mine at Gold Hill, near Marysville, and after about two 
years spent on the Pacific Coast returned to Illinois to visit his parents. 
A few months were passed in this state and he then again went to Cali- 
fornia, accompanied by a number of people from his locality. The 
second time his sojourn covered about three to four years, and following 
his return to Woodstock he established a general store, being connected 
with commercial interests of the city throughout the remainder of his 
life. He was perhaps even more widely known as a banker. A few 
years after starting in business in Woodstock he became cashier of the 
First National Bank, of which his father-in-law was president, and 
continued in active connection with the institution until he liquidated 
the bank because of his failing health. In 1892 he with his family spent 
a year in traveling through France, Italy, Germany, Austria, and the 
British Isles. About 1894 Mr. Murphy founded the bank which 
became known as the McHenry County State Bank, of which his son, 
G. L. Murphy, was elected president, but subsequently both with- 
drew. Later he established the American National Bank of Woodstock, 
of which his son is now the president, and continued in active association 
with the institution until his death. He did more to place on a sub- 
stantial footing the leading financial institutions of McHenry County 
than any other one man. Moreover, he was an extensive landowner, 
conducting his real-estate dealings in North Dakota, Minnesota and 
Wisconsin, besides owning many valuable farms in McHenry County 
and city property in Woodstock. In the early days of his connection 



HISTORY OP McHENRY COUNTY 751 

with mercantile interests of Woodstock he engaged in the grain and 
lumber business very extensively and met with substantial success in 
that way. At the time of his death his entire attention was taken up 
by the management of his estate. He was a man of excellent business 
ability, whose efforts were carefully directed by sound judgment, and 
at all times his business career was characterized by keen sagacity, 
unfaltering energy, straightforward purpose and laudable ambition. 

On July 13, 1859, Mr. Murphy was united in marriage to Miss 
Elizabeth A. Donnelly, who was born in Greenwood, McHenry County, 
111., a daughter of Ncill and Mary (McElroy) Donnelly, both of whom 
were natives of Ireland, the former born in County Derry and the latter 
in County Fermaugh. Mrs. Donnelly was brought to America by her 
parents in infancy and Neill Donnelly came when a youth of fifteen 
years, settling first at Lowell, Mass., where he worked in a wholesale 
carpet store until his marriage in 1838. He then came to Illinois, 
settling in Greenwood Township, McHenry County, where he purchased 
a farm and resided for several years. He was then elected sheriff of 
the county and removed to Woodstock. On his retirement from office 
he engaged in general merchandising, in which he continued until his 
death, about 1889. His wife passed away about 1895. Mr. Donnelly 
was not only well known as one of the foremost representatives of trade 
interests in Woodstock, but also served as mayor of the city for two 
or three terms and filled other municipal offices. He was admitted 
to the bar but never practiced. The community recognized in him 
a public-spirited man, whose unselfish devotion to the public welfare 
was above question. His business activity was also a strong element 
in the city's growth, and in the early days he was president of the First 
National Bank of Woodstock and was also the owner of considerable 
stock in the Northwestern Railroad. 

Mrs. Murphy, who died April 22, 1919, was the second in a family 
of ten children and by her marriage became the mother of seven chil- 
dren, namely: Julia, who died at the age of nineteen years while a 
student in the Boston Conservatory of Music; Charles F., who died at 
the age of two years; Mary F., who is the wife of Dr. George S. Thomas, 
formerly Dean of the University of N. D., but now a resident of Rich- 
mond, Va.; Eleanor G., who is the wife of J. N. Kelly, superintendent 
of the schools of Grand Forks, N. D.; Henry C, who is editor and 
manager of the Courier, a paper published at Evansville, Ind., married 
Miss Katherine Speed, of Memphis, Tenn., and they have one son, 
John S.; Evelyn C, who died April 26, 1908; George L., who is presi- 



752 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

dent of the American National Bank of Woodstock, married Miss 
Gabrielle Casanave of Philadelphia, Pa., and they have three children, 
Elizabeth, John J. and Frances Delphine. 

At one time Mr. Murphy became a member of the Masonic lodge 
but later withdrew. His political belief was that of an independent 
Democrat. For one term he served as mayor of Woodstock and he 
also was a member of the school board. Before advanced years came 
upon him he took an active interest in the social and political life of the 
city. He was a man fearless in expressing his opinions and yet did not 
arouse antagonism. He gave generously where aid was needed, yet 
no one knew the full extent of his charities or heard him speak of his 
benevolences; and was identified with practically every public improve- 
ment that tended to advance the material welfare and upbuilding of 
Woodstock, and his worth as a citizen cannot be overestimated. In 
the funeral service the priest of St. Mary's Catholic church, Father 
Gilmartin, said: 

"This day a great man has been called from our midst, a highly 
respected citizen of the community, one upon whom this city conferred 
the highest office in its trust, the duties of which office he discharged 
faithfully and honorably. He was a man of great executive powers 
and possessed of wonderful business ability. As a financier he had 
few equals and no superior in this section of the country. Nature 
endowed him with a strong indomitable will and magnificent intellect. 
He had a keen insight into human nature and a phenomenal grasp on 
business principles. John J. Murphy would have made a name for him- 
self in any walk of life and would be an honor to any profession. 

"About seventy years ago he came to our shores. Then he was a 
poor boy, six years old, without friends and without influence, yet by 
the sheer power of his innate faculties he overcame all obstacles and 
rose gradually until he stood in the very front rank of the business 
life of our community and was a recognized leader in the financial life 
of this city and of this county. 

"In his home the visitor always found in him the polished, refined, 
cultured, dignified, intelligent gentleman — man of affairs and man of 
letters. He had a great fund of information, gleaned alike from extensive 
reading and wide travels. He could speak intelligently and profoundly 
on almost any subject. 

"The deceased had many good qualities of mind and heart and 
surely the least of them was not his kindness and generosity. He 
gave much to charity, but his charity was for the most part unknown 






HISTORY OP McHENRY COUNTY 753 

to the world. That he gave quietly and unostentatiously, without any 
noise of publicity." 

Such is the history of one whom Woodstock long honored as among 
her most prominent citizens, one whose life work was of signal value 
and usefulness to his community, while his memory remained as a bene- 
diction to all who knew him. 



THEODORE D. MURPHY. 
Page 135. 



JOHN S. MYERS. 



John S. Myers, one of the progressive farmers of McHenry County, 
lives two miles west of Richmond village, in Richmond Township. 
He was born in his present house, August 26, 1864, a son of the late 
George H. Myers. George H. Myers was born at Utica, N. Y., January 
28, 1825, and died January 27, 1909. In 1844 he came with his parents, 
John D. and Eva D. Myers, natives of New York, to Kenosha, Wis. 
Soon thereafter the brother moved to the farm owned by his son, John 
S. Myers, which had been secured the year previously. It was wild 
prairie land, and comprised 220 acres, as it does now. On it John D. 
Myers and his wife passed away when quite aged. Early in life he was 
a strong Whig in his political sentiments, later becoming a Republican. 
In addition to his son, George H. Myers, John D. Myers had another 
son, Joseph, who was younger. 

George H. Myers remained on the farm and married Miranda Ladd, 
and they lived on this farm for years, but he later retired to another 
farm two miles away and there died when over eighty, and his widow, 
surviving him, lives at Richmond. The old farm buildings erected by 
him still stand, although John D. Myers has remodeled them. The 
children of George H. Myers were as follows: Alberta, who is Mrs. C. 
W. Radcliffe of Chicago; Emily, who is Mrs. W. M. Radcliffe of San 
Diego, Cal. ; Margaret, who is Mrs. J. J. Jewell of San Diego, Cal. ; and 
John S., whose name heads this review. 

Like his father, John S. Myers has made farming his life work, and 



754 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

pays special attention to dairying, keeping about thirty-five cows, the 
farm being well adapted to this class of agricultural activity. Having 
always lived on this property, Mr. Myers is very much attached to it, 
and takes a pride in following the example of efficiency and good citizen- 
ship set him by his father. 

On June 8, 1887, Mr. Myers was married to Alida Buchanan of Lodi, 
Wis., and their children are as follows: George, who married Kessie 
Hackett, has one daughter, Avis; and Alberta, who, after being grad- 
uated from the School of Expression of Columbia College and the Sisters' 
School at Kalamazoo, Mich., is now engaged in teaching in the Chicago 
public schools, being a very intelligent and efficient lady, well known in 
educational circles. Mr. Myers has never cared for politics, and will 
not accept of office, his time and interest being fully absorbed by his 
farming. His family is one of the old and honored ones in this neighbor- 
hood, and his long connection with the farming activities of Richmond 
Township have brought him to the notice of his fellow citizens in a very 
favorable light. It is such men as he, substantial, able and upright, 
who form the great backbone of American citizenship. 



WILLIAM ABBOTT NASON, M. D. 

William Abbott Nason, M. D., who is now deceased, was for twenty- 
five years the only physician and surgeon of Algonquin, and was a well- 
known figure to all of McHenry County. He was born at Hallowell, 
Maine, June 21, 1841, and he died at Algonquin, June 10, 1918, aged 
seventy-six years, eleven months and twenty days. 

After attending the Boston public schools, and the Buffalo High 
School, he took his medical training at Bellevue Hospital of New York 
City anil the Chicago Medical College, being graduated from the latter 
in 1866. The following year he located at Chicago, but being appointed 
assistant surgeon for the United States government, he went to Gordons- 
ville Hospital, Va., and later to the government hospital at Yorktown, 
Va. In 1868, he came to Algonquin and continued in active practice 
here for fifty years. During that period he took an active part in 
many movements, and was president of the Fox River Medical Society 
for one year, having assisted in founding it. For a number of years 
he was president of the school board, and had the betterment of the 
schools deeply at heart all his life. A scholarly man, he branched out 






HISTORY OP McHENRY COUNTY 755 

along scientific lines, and was one of the founders of the Chicago Academy 
of Sciences, and a member of the American Entomological Society of 
Philadelphia, Pa. Many of his pamphlets and articles on special sub- 
jects have been published, and he was an authority on botany and the 
fauna of his state. His collection of flowers and insects was one of the 
finest in the state, and is now preserved under his name at the University 
of Illinois. 

On June 29, 1874, Doctor Nason was married to Miss Anna Goodson 
of Algonquin, who survives him. They had the following children: 
William Edward, who is superintendent of the Borden Condensed 
Milk Company at Algonquin, has a daughter, Wilma Margaret; Mrs. 
Mary Elizabeth Raedel, who has two children, Marion Nason, and 
Paul Nason; and Charles Craig, who is of Algonquin. Doctor Nason 
was a Mason and a member of 'the Modern Woodmen and of the 
Maccabees. 



WILLIAM E. NASON. 



William E. Nason, superintendent of the Algonquin plant of Borden's 
Condensed Milk Company, is one of the thoroughly competent and 
practical men of McHenry County, who has rendered valuable service 
to his company and community in his present capacity. He was born 
at Algonquin, on the site now occupied by the Algonquin Bank building, 
October 28, 1881, a son of the venerated Dr. W. A. Nason, a sketch 
of whom appears elsewhere in this work. 

After attending the public schools of Algonquin, he completed his 
studies at the Elgin Academy and then entered the employ of the 
Northwestern Railroad Company, where he remained until 1903, in 
February of that year engaging with his present company, first as 
shipping clerk, then as bookkeeper, and on October 1, 1914, he was 
promoted to his present position. 

On October 21, 1914, Mr. Nason was married to Miss Margaret 
Wahlen, a daughter of Joseph Wahlen of Algonquin. They have 
one daughter, Wilma M., who was born February 23, 1916. Mr. and 
Mrs. Nason attend the Congregational Church. Mr. Nason belongs 
to Algonquin Lodge No. 960, A. F. & A. M., and has the distinction 
of being the first member raised. Mr. Nason has been the Republican 
candidate for precinct committeeman and alderman, and elected by 
a large majority. 



756 HISTORY OP McHENBY COUNTY 

GEORGE H. NICKELS. 

George H. Nickels, manager of the J. H. Patterson Lumber Com- 
pany of Huntley, is one of the enterprising business men of McHenry 
County. He was born at West McHenry, March 31, 1880, a son of 
Christopher and Dena (Tunion) Nickels. The former was a mason by 
trade, and worked as such until his death. He and his wife had nine 
children born to them. 

George H. Nickels attended the common and high schools of McHenry 
County, and then began working with his present firm, having secured 
all of his business experience with them, rising from subordinate posi- 
tions to his present one through merit. The J. H. Patterson Lumber 
Company does a large business, its annual sales amounting to $25,000.00. 

On September 27, 1912, Mr. Nickels was married to Miss Emma 
Felschow, a daughter of Frank Felschow, prominent in the mercantile 
circles of Dundee, 111. Mr. and Mrs. Nickels have one son, Harold H., 
who was born July 18, 1912. Mr. Nickels is a Republican, but has not 
been active in politics. He and his wife belong to the Lutheran church. 
In his case faithful endeavor and intelligent application have resulted 
in deserved reward, and he stands as well in his community as he does 
with his company. 



CHARLES LUMAN NICHOLS. 

Charles Luman Nichols, now living retired on his farm two miles 
west of Hebron, in Hebron Township, was born February 17, 1852, 
a son of Samuel John and Mary (Adams) Nichols, who came to Wis- 
consin in 1854, buying land in Lynn Township, Walworth County, that 
state, four miles north of the present home of Charles L. Nichols. Two 
cousins of Mrs. Nichols, John and Charles Adams, had located there 
previously, in company with Whitney Brigham and Josiah Giddings, 
all of whom secured land, adjoining. John Nichols and his wife had the 
following family: Levi Adams, who is president of the First National 
Bank of Lake Geneva, Wis.; Charles L., whose name heads this review; 
Frances E., who married John J. Stewart of Hebron; Mary, who mar- 
ried Wilbur Adams of Morristown, Minn.; and James G., who is living 
on the old farm in Lynn Township, Walworth County, Wis. 

Charles L. Nichols was reared on his father's farm, attending the 
district schools until eighteen years old, and was also a student during 



HISTORY OP McHENRY COUNTY 757 

portions of two years at the Whitewater Normal School. During the 
winter months of five years he taught school in Lynn Township. When 
he was twenty years old, his uncle John Adams died, and he and his 
sister Mary came to live with their aunt, and he conducted the farm 
for her during the first year and then leased it for three years. Mrs. 
Adams then moved to Oshkosh, Wis., and another tenant took the 
farm. During the winter months Mr. Nichols continued to teach 
school, but in the summer months farmed. Eventually he bought the 
John Adams farm of 155 acres, and still later the adjoining farm of 
120 acres of Charles Adams. Both John and Charles Adams were 
survived by their widows, but neither left any children. 

Mr. Nichols has fed hogs, cattle of the Shorthorn strain, and carried 
on dairying, making of it in later years his main feature. He improved 
his farms and has a very fine property. It was his intention for some 
years to retire from active participation when he became fifty years 
old, and this he did in 1901, moving into a new house he had just erected. 
Since then he has not over-exerted himself, feeling that he has earned 
his leisure. While a Republican, Mr. Nichols supports the policies of 
President Wilson. 

On September 24, 1888, Mr. Nichols was married to Ida Frances 
Anderson, a daughter of James Lee and Solinda (Thompson) Anderson 
of Lawrence, Chemung Township, where Mrs. Nichols was born July 7, 
18G4. Mrs. Anderson died October 25, 1915, and Mr. Anderson lives 
with Mr. and Mrs. Nichols. The children in the Nichols family are as 
follows: Mary Anderson, who is a professional librarian; and Charles 
Henry, Louise Lydia and Ralph Levi, who are all at home. Mr. Nichols 
is one of the representative men of the county, and is held in exceeding 
high esteem. 



DAVID B. NICHOLS. 



David B. Nichols, one of the most prominent men of Woodstock, is 
engaged in conducting the leading plumbing establishment at the county 
seat. He is a native of Illinois, and was born April 7, 1871, one of the 
three children of Alexander M. and Mary Ann (McElroy) Nichols. 
Alexander M. Nichols was also born in Illinois, and he was an engineer 
by trade, working both on railroad and stationary engines until his 
death in November, 1889. 

David B. Nichols attended both the common and high schools, 



758 HISTORY OF McIIEXRY col'NTV 

and in 1S88 became apprenticed to the plumbing trade, which he com- 
pleted in 1895. In 1901 he came to Woodstock and organized his present 
business, and carries a full and varied line of plumbing and heating 
apparatus and equipment valued at about $5,000, and does the largest 
amount of business in this part of the county. 

Mr. Nichols was united in marriage with Miss Mary H. Hansen, 
a daughter of John Hansch, and they have one son, Leslie A. Politically 
Mr. Nichols is a Republican, but he has held no offices. His fraternal 
connections are with the Masons and Elks. Mr. and Mrs. Nichols are 
consistent members of the Presbyterian church. Their residence is 
at No. 532 Austin avenue, Woodstock, where their many friends are 
always made cordially welcome. 



HAMILTON NIXON. 
Page 136. 

LESTER C. NOGLE. 



Lester C. Nogle, secretary, treasurer and manager of the popular 
dry-goods establishment known as the Woodstock Dry Goods Company, 
is one of the leading and alert business men of Woodstock. He was 
born in Wisconsin, April 28, 1880, the only child of William B. and 
Emma C. (Gaylord) Nogle. William B. Nogle was also born in Wiscon- 
sin, but later came to Woodstock, where he now resides, being an expert 
carpenter. 

Lester C. Nogle attended both the common and high schools, and 
his first business experience was gained with his present firm. He 
entered the establishment as a clerk and gradually was advanced until 
in 1915, he was made its manager, and has since capably and satis- 
factorily discharged the duties of that position. Subsequently he was 
elected secretary and treasurer, and is now a stockholder. He has under 
his direct supervision several employes, and the annual business trans- 
acted by the firm is very satisfactory to stockholders. This firm has 
been in existence since 1902, and a full line of dry goods, cloaks, suits 
and notions is always carried. 




. 






'jAA^U I 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 759 

In 1902 Mr. Nogle was united in marriage with Miss Emily C. Neil, 
a daughter of Charles Neil. Mr. and Mrs. Nogle have one daughter, Joye 
M. Both he and Mrs. Nogle belong to the Baptist church. In politics 
he is a Republican. Fraternally he belongs to the Odd Fellows, and 
Elks. A man of unusual ability, he has risen through his own efforts, 
and is justly regarded as one of the representative men of McHenry 
County. 



CORNELIUS NOLAN. 



Cornelius Nolan, former assessor of Hartland Township, and one 
of the thoroughly representative men of McHenry County, owns and 
operates a fine farm seven miles northwest of Woodstock. He was born 
on his present farm, January 8, 18.50, a son of Thomas B. and Margaret 
(Nolan) Nolan. Although the parents were both natives of County 
Fermsuagh, Ireland, and bore the same name, no relationship existed 
between them. They were married in their native county, which they 
left in 1837, for the United States to join a brother who had become a 
contractor at Holyoke, Mass. After his arrival, Thomas B. Nolan be- 
came a boss of a gang on railroad construction and kept a boarding house. 
In 1842, he came to McHenry County and secured the present farm of 
his son as a pre-emption claim, not then surveyed. About the same time, 
a brother of his, Patrick Nolan, settled near the present site of St. 
Patrick's church, as did a Mr. McCaffrey, a friend of the brothers in 
their native land, but he later left McHenry County for California. 
Thomas B. Nolan lived on his farm until his death, January 8, 1889, 
when he was ninety-seven years of age. His wife died two years before 
him, aged eighty-four years. 

Cornelius Nolan is devoting the greater part of his attention to 
dairying, and keeps from fifteen to twenty high-grade Holstein cows, 
the greater number of which he has raised. For over thirty-four years 
he served continuously as assessor of Hartland Township, but made his 
last assessment in 1918. Always a Democrat, he has taken an active 
part in his party. Mr. Nolan's parents were among the original mem- 
bers of St. Patrick's Catholic church, which is two miles distant from 
his farm. Probably no other man knows as well as he the values of real 
estate in Hartland Township and certainly no man has more or warmer 
friends. 

When Mr. Nolan was thirty-four years old he was married to Mary 



760 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

Ann McCabc, :i daughter of Patrick McCabe, a neighboring farmer, 
and after twenty-two years of married life together, they were separated 
by her death. They had eight children, as follows: Thomas Francis, 
who is located at Chicago, is a member of the Pinkerton Detective 
Agency; Joseph Charles, who is engaged in farming two miles west of 
his father; W. Cornelius, who resides at Woodstock; Patrick Henry, 
who served during the Great War; Albert Michael, who is assisting his 
father on the farm; and Margaret Ann, Susan Mary and Winifred Cath- 
erine, all of whom are at home. The last named was only two years 
old when Mrs. Nolan died. The Nolan home is one of the most popular 
in the township, and a center of social activity, the young people and 
their estimable father welcoming here their many friends. 



EDWARD E. NOWAK. 



Edward E. Nowak, proprietor of the Nowak Machine Works of 
Union, and agent for the Dort, Empire and Jackson cars, also owns a 
well-equipped garage, and is one of the progressive men of McHenry 
County. He was born in Cook County, 111., August 16, 1881, a son of 
John and Tena (Guse) Nowak. 

Edward E. Nowak attended both the common and high schools of 
his locality, and learned the carpenter trade, working at that before 
he entered the real estate business at Chicago. In 1917 Mr. Nowak 
came to Union and established his present business, which he has con- 
tinued to expand until he has one of the best of its kind in his locality. 

On June 6, 1906, he was married to Miss Mary Steinke, born Decem- 
ber 18, 1885, a daughter of William Steinke and Emeline Dittbenner, 
and member of one of the old families of McHenry County. Mr. 
Steinke was a successful farmer of this county. Mr. and Mrs. Nowak 
have two children, namely: Elwood B., who was born February 13, 
1907; and Ralph E., who was horn January 11, 1911. Mr. Nowak 
is a Republican. He and his family belong to the Lutheran Church. 



ALBERT E. NYE. 



Albert E. Nye, formerly superintendent of the schools of McHenry, 
is one of the learned and scholarly men produced by McHenry County, 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 761 

and one whose efforts in behalf of the children of this section, met with 
deserved appreciation. He was born in Ohio, October 2, 1884, one of 
the fourteen children born to Frank and Mary (LaFountain) Nye. 
Frank Nye was a farmer and miller in Ohio. 

After attending the district schools of Alveda, Ohio, Professor Nye 
entered the preparatory school at Ada, Ohio, and then for several years 
was engaged in teaching in the rural districts of Ohio. After he had 
further prepared himself for his selected profession, by taking a scientific 
course at the University of Valparaiso, Ind., he accepted a position at 
Aberdeen, S. D., and later was made superintendent of schools of 
Gettysburg, S. D. Four years afterwards he attended the University 
of Wisconsin to take a course in manual training and in other special 
work, and in 1910, he came to McHenry County to assume charge of 
the city schools of McHenry. The pupils under his charge numbered 
about 260, and he had eight teachers working with him. The present 
modern school building was erected under his supervision in 1914. 
He is now superintendent of the Community High School at Coal City, 
111. 

Mr. Nye was married to Lucile Gutzwiler, a daughter of George 
Gutzwiler, and they have three children, namely: Roseline L., who 
was born November 1, 1911; Lowell W., who was born July 28, 1914; 
and Ruth E., who was born September 13, 1916.- Mr. Nye is inde- 
pendent in his political views. 



NICHOLAS J. NYE, M. D. 

Nicholas J. Nye, M. D., one of the most prominent physicians and 
surgeons of McHenry County, is engaged in a general practice at Mc- 
Henry, where his skill is duly recognized. He was born in Ohio, October 
15, 1871, a son of Frank and Mary (LaFountain) Nye, also natives of 
Ohio, where the father was a farmer and miller. He died in 1913, but 
the mother survives. 

After attending the local schools, Nicholas J. Nye entered the 
Starling School of Medicine at Columbus, Ohio, from which he was 
graduated, and he took post-graduate courses at Chicago, and the 
Memphis Medical College, of Memphis, Tenn. In 1910, Dr. Nye 
came to McHenry to succeed Dr. Fegers, having previously been engaged 
in practice at Johnsburg, and he still retains his very valuable farm of 
160 acres in Richmond Township. 



762 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

Dr. Nye was married to Miss Katherine C. Hoffbauer, a daughter 
of Joseph Hoffbauer. Dr. and Mrs. Nye became the parents of the 
following children: Harvey E., Rose Mary, Herman T., William and 
Eugene. The family belong to the Catholic church. Dr. Nye is a mem- 
ber of the McHenry County Medical Society and the State Medical 
Society and the American Medical Association. He is a carefully trained 
and experienced man, and his success in his practice comes of his natural 
skill and proficiency. 



WILLIAM H. O'BRIEN. 

William H. O'Brien owns and conducts one of the finest drug stores 
in McHenry County, and is one of the leading business men of Richmond. 
He was born at Clinton Junction, Wis., April 9, 1872, one of the two 
children born to James and Anna (Simpson) O'Brien. James O'Brien 
became well known to the traveling public through his hotel which he 
conducted at Pecatonica, 111., until his death in 1887. His widow sur- 
vived him until 1900, when she, too, passed away. 

William H. O'Brien attended the common and high schools of 
Pecatonica, and the Northwestern University, School of Pharmacy in 
1894. He then went to Winnebago, 111., and for four years clerked in 
drug store of U. G. Dennison, located at Chicago, and foreightyears 
operated a drug store under the firm name of Kask & O'Brien. Leaving 
Chicago, he went to Woodstock, and spent four years in the pharmacy 
of L. T. Hoy, coming then to Richmond, where he has built up a mag- 
nificent business. He not only carries a full line of drugs, but also of 
stationery, kodaks and photographic supplies, toilet articles and kindred 
articles, his stock being valued at $10,000. 

Mr. O'Brien belongs to Woodstock Chapter No. 143, R. A. M. In 
politics he is a Republican. His services during the late war were very 
valuable, and he proved his patriotism and support of the administration 
in his effective work in the various campaigns to raise funds and sell 
Liberty Loans. It would be difficult to find a man more universally 
liked and respected than he. 



MICHAEL F. O'CONNOR. 

Michael F. O'Connor, postmaster of Harvard, is one of the men in 
the government service who deserves the position he now holds, having 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 763 

worked up to it and rendered faithful and efficient returns for the con- 
fidence reposed in him. He was born in McHenry County, July 20, 1856, 
one of the seven children of Daniel and Mary (Fogerty) O'Connor, 
natives of Ireland, who came to the United States in 1846, first locating 
in Ohio, from whence in 1852, they came to McHenry County, 111., 
which continued their home until death claimed them, he passing away 
in 1891, she surviving him until 1906. They were farming people, and 
very highly esteemed. 

Michael F. O'Connor attended the common schools of McHenry 
County, and worked on his father's farm until he was twenty-five years 
old. He then went upon the road as a salesman, and in 1884, he became 
a mail clerk on the railroad. In 1913, President Wilson appointed him 
postmaster of Harvard, and he now has fourteen people under him, among 
them being his assistant, Miss Elizabeth Sweeney. 

Mr. O'Connor was married to Miss Elizabeth Young, a daughter 
of James Young, and they have two children, namely: Mary Frances, 
and Eugene M. Mr. O'Connor and his family all belong to the Roman 
Catholic church. In politics he is a strong Democrat. For some years 
he has belonged to the Illinois Commercial Travelers Association. A 
painstaking public official, Mr. O'Connor gives universal satisfaction 
to the people of Harvard, and as a result of his able management, the 
affairs of his office are in prime condition. 



JACOB OLBRICH. 



Jacob Olbrich, now deceased, was formerly one of the most pros- 
perous farmers of Chemung, and a man who held the respect of his 
neighbors by reason of his sturdy honesty and upright character. He 
was born at Wetzlar, Germany, July 25, 1838, and came to the United 
States in August, 185S, locating at once in McHenry County. He 
secured fifty acres of land on section 9, of Chemung Township. After 
coming here he was married to Katherine Weitzel, born in Germany 
in 1847, and she died leaving five children. On January 17, 1871, he 
was married (second) to Mary E. Weitzel, younger sister of the first 
wife. She was also born in Germany. By his first marriage Jacob 
Olbrich had the following children: William, who was born June 26, 
1859, lives at Harvard; Elizabeth, who was born January 18, 1861, 
married George Fanning, and is now deceased; Mary, who was born 



764 HISTORY OF McHENBY COUNTY 

October 19, 1862, married Charles Tooker of Edgar, Nebr.; Augusta, 
who was born April 22, 1865, married Fred Parent, and died leaving 
three children; and Otelia, who was born May 12, 1868, is Mrs. Frank 
Amnion of Sterling, 111. By his second marriage he had the following 
children: John, who was born June 8, 1873, lives in Marengo Town- 
ship; Jacob, who was born June 8, 1876, is mentioned below; Frank, 
who died in Colorado when about thirty years of age; Michael, who is 
now deputy attorney general of Wisconsin, resides at Madison, Wis., 
and was graduated from the law department of the University of Wis- 
consin; and Emi 1 , who was drowned while bathing in Lake Mendota, 
Madison, Wis. He had just been graduated from the State University 
at the age of twenty-three years, and had a brilliant future before him. 
The' father of these children, Jacob Olbrich, was killed on the railroad 
crossing at Lawrence in 1897, while trying to cross the tracks. His 
horses became uncontrollable and they, too, were killed. At that time, 
Mr. Olbrich was fifty-nine years of age. His widow died about seven 
years ago. Both are buried in Bigfoot Cemetery. Mr. Olbrich spent 
his entire life on a farm and was an excellent business man. The German 
Evangelical church had in him a most devout member, and he was held 
in high esteem in the congregation. Mrs. Olbrich was a daughter of 
Frederick Weitzel, a neighbor of Mr. Olbrich, born in German}- in 
January, 1810. In 1852 he came to the United States brining with him 
his wife whom he had married in 1835. Her maiden name was Amarilla 
Gabriel, and she was born in German}' in 1813. The three children of 
the Weitzel family were as follows: Katherine, who is deceased, was the 
wife of Jacob Olbrich; Christina, who resides in Wisconsin, is the widow 
of John Mueller; and Amarilla, who was born September 10, 1845, be- 
came the second Mrs. Olbrich. Mr. Weitzel died about 1895, aged 
eighty-six years, his widow surviving him until she was ninety-five 
years old. This is a long-lived family. 

Jacob Olbrich, the younger, owns 124 acres of land formerly the 
Weitzel farm, to which he has added thirty acres, all in Chemung Town- 
ship. This farm is well developed and on it Mr. Olbrich carries on 
dairying, having thirty cows, and he also raises horses, hogs and other 
stock. He is not married, his home being cared for by Mrs. Flora Wood, 
widow of James E. Wood, who was born and reared in Chemung. He 
was an inventor among his other products being a corn husker, on 
which patents were granted. While working as a millwright mechanic 
at Aurora, lie was killed on October 12, 1910, his clothing catching in 
the machinery. Mrs. Wood has a daughter, Grace A. Wood who is the 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 765 

wife of Randall Weitzel of Harvard. They have no children. Mr. 
Weitzel is engaged in a real-estate business and is a rising young man. 
Both the Olbrich and Weitzel families are old ones of McHenry County, 
and they are associated by ties of friendship and intermarriage. 



SOREN P. OLESEN. 



Soren P. Olesen, city assessor of Marengo, owns some valuable rural 
property in McHenry County, and was formerly one of its progressive 
agriculturalists. He was born in Denmark, April 3, 1861. In 1883 he 
came to the United States, and for a while divided his time between 
working on a farm in the vicinity of Petersburg, 111., and labor in Moline, 
111. In the spring of 1884, he went to South Dakota, homesteaded at 
Charles, Mix County, proved up his farm and lived on it for about five 
years, in all spending eleven years in South Dakota. He then returned 
to Illinois, settling near Capron, Boone County, where his wife was 
born and had lived until nine years of age, and in March, 1901, came to 
McHenry County, buying a farm at the Seven Bridges, five and one- 
half miles west of Marengo. This farm comprised 292}^ acres of land 
and was then known as the Delos Poyer farm, but is now named The 
Highland Farm. For the subsequent fifteen years, Mr. Olesen lived 
upon this property, making many improvements, including the erection 
of a large dairy barn, the remodeling of all the buildings, and the putting 
in of a silo, forty-eight feet high. His new barn stands on the site of 
the old one. This farm is a very good one, comparing favorably with 
any other in the township. On it dairying and hog raising are carried 
on very profitably. He sold this farm in 1916, and in this transaction 
obtained his present 120-acre farm in Coral Township, where he has 
built a silo similar to the one on his original farm, and this is rented 
to a tenant. In June, 1919, he bought another 120-acre farm in Riley 
Township. About three years ago Mr. Olesen moved to Marengo. 
While not a strong partisan, he generally votes the Republican ticket, 
and is thoroughly Americanized. Prior to his election as city assessor, 
he had served acceptably on the district school board, and is a man of 
sterling character and unflinching honesty. He was reared in the faith 
of the Lutheran church, but since coming to this country has been 
identified with the Presbyterian church, of which he is an elder, and 
clerk of the sessions. 



766 HISTORY OF McIIENRY COUNTY 

On April 2, 1893, Mr. Olesen was married in South Dakota to Maude 
M. Carroll, born August 10, 1874, which in that year fell upon Easter 
Sunday, but it has not since occurred. Mrs. Olesen was born at Capron, 
111., a daughter of H. M. and Climena (Blodgett) Carroll, who brought 
her to South Dakota in 1883. Mrs. Carroll died in South Dakota, 
and Mr. Carroll spent his last years with his daughter, Mrs. Olesen in 
McHenry County, although for several years he was a hardware dealer 
at Capron, 111. He was a highly respected man, and a Thirty-second 
Degree Mason, and had organized several lodges during the twenty-one 
years he lived in South Dakota, for which he was awarded a medal, now 
in the possession of Mrs. Olesen. He was buried at Platte, S. D., by 
members of his lodge. Mr. and Mrs. Olesen have had the following 
children: Metta, who married Roy Stock, lives near Seven Bridges, 
Marengo Township; Ralph C, who was in the service during the Great 
War as an aviation mechanic, spent six months in England, after having 
been in training at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., San Antonio, Tex., and 
Long Island for fourteen months, and was discharged with creditable 
mention; Lyle D., who is in the employ of the Oliver Typewriter Com- 
pany at Woodstock; Muriel V., who is attending the Marengo High 
School; and Erving B., who died in infancy. 



SILAS E. OLMSTEAD. 



Silas E. Olmstead, ex-mayor of Woodstock, owns and operates a 
fine farm of 270 acres of choice land in the vicinity of the county seat. 
He was born in New York state, November 29, 1851, a son of Edwin 
S. and Maria (Marshall) Olmstead, who had four children, two of 
whom survive. Edwin S. Olmstead was also born in New York state, 
died in Ridgefield, 111., July 15, 1913. 

Mr. Olmstead attended the schools of McHenry County, where he 
was brought when one year old, and was reared on a farm. Having 
learned the principles of farming from boyhood, when he attained to 
mature years, he naturally adopted farming as his life work, and has 
always been engaged in that calling, and stock raising, with marked 
success. 

In 1874 Mr. Olmstead was united in marriage with Miss Mary Scott, 
a daughter of Andrew Scott, and they have had two children: Winnifred 
D., and Delbert J. Mr. and Mrs. Olmstead are consistent members 





e.M^u 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 767 

of the Presbyterian church. Very prominent as a Republican, he was 
elected on his ticket for alderman, and in 1917 was elected mayor of 
Woodstock, and while in office gave the city a fine and businesslike 
administration, and he takes a deep interest in public matters. His 
fraternal affiliations are with the Woodmen of the World and the Court 
of Honor. A man of high principles, he has always lived up to them, 
and is a citizen of whom his county may well feel proud. 



KNUTE OLSON. 



Knute Olson, one of the younger agriculturalists of Grafton Town- 
ship, and a leader among those who claim Sweden as their place of 
birth, was born in Sweden, January 17, 1878, a son of Jons and Anna 
Olson, farming people. Knute Olson was well educated before he left 
Sweden, and taught to be a practical farmer under the wise guidance 
of his father. In 1897, when he was nineteen years old, he came to the 
United States, and located at Huntley, working on a farm in its vicinity 
for four years. He then spent a year in Chicago, but returned to Grafton 
Township, where he rented land, until be bought his present farm. 
This property of 200 acres was the old J. J. Schuyler farm, and here 
he carries on general farming and dairying, and has been very successful. 

In 1905 Knute Olson was married to Clara Holmgreev, also born in 
Sweden, and they have four children, namely: Russell, Arthur, Knute 
and Garnet. Mr. Olson is a Republican. Probably he is one of the best 
examples of what can be accomplished through a man's industry and 
thrift in the county. Coming to this country without means, he has 
in a little over twenty years become the owner of one of the finest farms 
in Grafton Township, and won confidence and respect of his fellow 
citizens. 



SAMUEL L. ORVIS. 



Samuel L. Orvis, now living retired at Spring Grove, is one of the 
veterans of the Civil War, and a man whose usefulness to his country 
in both war and peace has been clearly proven. He was born at Battle- 
boro, Vt,, January 1, 1840, a son of Simeon V. and Derexey (Campbell) 
Orvis, and grandson of David C. Orvis, who was a Revolutionary 



768 HISTORY OF McllENRY COUNTY 

soldier and officer. In 1840 the family moved to New York, and in 
1853, to Illinois, and after three years in this state, went to Wilmot, 
Wis. Still later, Simeon V. Orvis went to Iowa, but he and his wife 
spent their last days with their children, of whom there were four grow- 
ing to maturity and marrying. 

Samuel L. Orvis enlisted for service during the Civil War, in Novem- 
ber, 1861, in the First Wisconsin Cavalry, and re-enlisted in the same 
regiment in 1864, continuing with it until after peace was declared. 
During the last year he was commanding sergeant, and was detailed 
to capture Jefferson Davis. Succeeding in the undertaking, he with 
his comrades shared the reward. During his long and dangerous service 
he was not wounded or captured. Mr. Orvis received his honorable 
discharge in July, 1865, after three and one-half years of service. 

Mr. Orvis was married (first) to Miss Lavina Sanborn, at Wilmot, 
Wis., November 4, 1866. A sketch of the Sanborn family is given 
elsewhere* in this work. Mr. Orvis was a farmer of Richmond Township 
until 1888, but in that year moved on the old Sanborn homestead that 
originally belonged to Grandmother Sanborn. During recent years 
he has lived retired at Spring Grove. He and his wife had the follow- 
ing children born to them: Clarence C, who is an attorney of Oskaloosa, 
Iowa; Rose, who married James Madden, has six children and is now 
housekeeper for her father, her children being, Mary, James, Catherine, 
Samuel and Margaret P.; Bryon, who lives at Waukegan, 111., is a city 
employe; Elmer, who is city attorney of Waukegan; and Frank, who was 
killed in 1909 on the railroad at Shernierville, 111., was a railroad 
employe; and Everett, who is a farmer of Lake County, 111. Mr. Orvis 
is one of the most highly respected men of the county, and deserves the 
leisure he is now enjoying for he has worked hard in previous years. 



ADDISON D. OSBORN. 

Addison D. Osborn, one of the prominent residents and leading 
merchants of Woodstock, carries a select line of hardware, china and 
auto supplies, and is regarded as one of the most successful men of 
McHenry County. He was born in Delaware County, N. Y., January 
29, 1860, one of the three children born to Ogden A. and Susan (Multer) 
Osborn. Ogden A. Osborn was born in New York state, and came to 



HISTORY OF McHENRY ColXTV 769 

McHenry County, 111., in 1873, where he was engaged in farming until 
his death in 1S86. His widow survived him until 1909. 

Addison D. Osborn attended both the common and high schools, 
completing his studies at Woodstock. His first business experience 
was gained in the store of E. A. Purphy and Company, dry goods mer- 
chants, with whom he remained until 1886, when he went to Chicago, 
remaining there until 1897, when he returned to Woodstock, and bought 
his present business from George Eckert and L. J. Young and has since 
conducted it. His stock which is a very fine one, and his store, is 
located on the public square, fronting Cass street, and adjoining the 
Farmers Exchange State Bank. 

In 1888 Mr. Osborn was married to Miss Bessie Delamere, a daugh- 
ter of Charles Delamere of Michigan. Mr. and Mrs. Osborn have one 
daughter, namely: Ada Doris, who was born May 23, 1890. She was 
married to Fred J. Mershon, residing at Bay City, Mich., and they have 
one son, John Osborn Mershon. The family residence of the Osborns 
is No. 515 Jackson street, Woodstock. Both he and Mrs. Osborn belong 
to the Presbyterian church of Woodstock. Mr. Osborn is a Republican, 
and for four years he was a member of the city council, and proved 
himself a very capable man in office. An excellent business man, he has 
known how to meet the requirements of the public, and his prosperity 
is well deserved. 



WILLIAM J. OVERTON. 

William J. Overton, one of the substantial men of Richmond Town- 
ship, is located at Solon Mills, where he was born June 6, 1854, a son of 
James and Harriet (Rowson) Overton, both born in the same parish in 
Lincolnshire, England. They came to the United States at different 
times, and in 1832 were married in New York, coming later to Solon 
Mills, where he first conducted a cheese factory, and later a farm. At 
the time he bought it the land was covered by timber, and he sold a 
good deal of it to the railroads, clearing off at least 200 acres, for which 
he had paid $25 per acre. He and his wife had four children, as follows: 
William J.; Richard; Addie, who died at the age of twenty-five years; 
and Ruth, who died at the age of sixteen years. Richard married 
Fannie Killey, who survives him and lives at McHenry. They had two 
children, who also survive. He operated his father's homestead until 
his death in 1900, when he was fifty-four years old. 



770 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

William J. Overton was engaged in buying and selling stock in part- 
nership with his father for some years, and later handled cattle for dairy 
use. When the railroad was built, he established a lumber yard and. 
operated it for five years. For a number of years he has been engaged in 
farming, carrying forty pure Holstein cows in his herd. His son, Lyn- 
ford, is breeding full-blood Holstein cattle with marked success, and 
his son Duane was operating the homestead and carrying on dairying, 
until the farm was sold in 1920 to Willis Gardner. 

In 1878 William J. Overton was united in marriage with Eliza 
Richardson, a daughter of Robert Richardson, a sketch of whom appears 
elsewhere in this work. Mr. Richardson was an honored resident of 
Burton Township. Mr. and Mrs. Overton have had the following 
children, namely: James, who married Mamie Cary, had one son James; 
Lynford, who married Ada Coddington of Milwaukee, Wis., has two 
children, Avis and Virginia; Duane, who married Lotis McCloon of 
Minneapolis, Minn., has four children, William, Bertha, Evelyn and 
Lotis Lillian; and Addie, who is Mrs.- Willis H. Gardner of Richmond 
Township, has four children, William Robert, Eunice and Ruth, and 
Sydney, who died aged seventeen years. 

The present residence of Mr. Overton was built by his father, who 
lived in a portion of it. While Mr. Overton has always been a stanch 
Republican and a hard worker for his party, it has been because he 
believed it his duty to do so, and not for any material benefits, for he is 
not an office seeker, although he has served on the school board. Fra- 
ternally he belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America, and is inter- 
ested in success as he is in everything with which he is connected. He 
is a man whose personal probity is unquestioned, and one who has 
brought considerable business to his locality by his extensive operations. 



CHARLES L. PAGE. 



Charles L. Page, one of the representative men of McHenry Town- 
ship, was born on the opposite side of the road from his present farm 
that is located one and one-half miles south of McHenry. The date 
of his birth is January 15, 1865, and he is a son of William and Jane 
(Harrison) Page, the former of whom was born in County Kent, England, 
and the latter in Lincolnshire, England. The paternal grandfather, 
Joseph Page, came to the United States when his son William was eight 






HISTORY OP McHENRY COUNTY 771 

years old, locating in New York state, where he remained until the son 
migrated to Illinois, and bought a farm east of McHenry, in McHenry 
County. The maternal grandfather brought his daughter, Jane Harri- 
son to the United States when she was six years old. 

After securing land in McHenry County, William Page returned 
to New York state and remained two years, but then came back to 
McHenry County, and for two years rented land in Nunda Township. 
About I860 he bought the farm in McHenry Township on which his 
son, Charles L. was born, and where his father, Joseph Page spent his 
last days. William Page lived for thirty years upon this farm, and then 
in 1890 went to Chicago to reside with his daughters, with whom he 
died in 1895, aged sixty-seven years. His farm originally contained 
104 acres, and he conducted it, although he was a butcher by trade and 
followed that calling in New York state. The residence now standing 
was erected by him, and he put in other improvements. Never desiring 
public honors, he devoted the time others usually give to politics to 
work in connection with the Methodist Episcopal church of which he 
was an active and useful member. William Page and his wife had the 
following children: Franklin, who went to Slayton, Minn., in young 
manhood, died there; Charles L., whose name heads this review; Ella, 
who is deceased, was the wife of Murray Terrill of Minnesota; Emma, 
who is the widow of De Forest Feullington, lives with her brother, 
Charles L. Page; Nettie, who is the widow of E. B. Webster, lives at 
Washington, D. C. ; and Cora, who died unmarried, at the age of twenty- 
four years. 

Charles L. Page remained with his father until the latter moved 
to Chicago in 1890, when he took charge of the homestead, and when 
his father died inherited a portion of it. He bought the interests of 
the other heirs, and continued to live there until about 1914 when he 
bought eighty-six acres across the road from J. C. Ralston. The build- 
ings were already erected, but he remodelled them and made a number 
of improvements. Later he added to this farm until it now contains 
291 acres, and he operates both it and his other farm. On the old 
homestead he has erected a new barn, remodelled the old one and put 
up two silos. For a number of years Mr. Page has specialized in dairy- 
ing and now keeps a herd of thirty-five cows known as the "'Sunnyside 
Herd," all being thoroughbred Holstein cattle, and twenty-one of them 
are pure bred. He is not an exhibitor but sells his products at auctions. 
Mr. Page, has several fine Holstein bulls and breeds extensively. For 
fourteen years he has operated a threshing outfit, and owns and uses 



772 HISTORY OF McHENBT COUNTY 

gas and oil tractors for his machines which include a shredder, thresher 
and similar implements, his equipment being one of the most complete 
and modern in the county. He is still threshing for the same patrons 
he gained at the beginning of his career, and has all the contracts he can 
fill. Aside from serving as a school trustee for a number of years, Mr. 
Page has not found time to enter public life, but always votes the Repub- 
lican ticket. 

When he was twenty-four years old. Mr. Page was married to Julia 
A. Fryer of Woodstock, who died eleven years later leaving him with 
the following children: Charles R.. who served during the World War 
in France; Roy, who was killed by accident at the age of fifteen years; 
Letah, who is Mrs. Earl Thomas of Elgin, 111.; and Lester, who is at 
home. Mr. Page was married (second) to Martha Rossmann of Mc- 
Henry, and they have one son, Frank Chance. 



LEWIS B. PALMER. 



Lewis B. Palmer, one of the leading members of the McHenry County 
bar, is engaged in the practice of his profession at Harvard. He was born 
in Chemung Township, August 13, 1879. being one of a family of four 
children of his parents, Elbert and Frances M. (Gilbert ) Palmer. Elbert 
Palmer was born in Bradford County, Pa., and in 1878 came to McHenry 
County, buying land in Chemung Township. A blacksmith by trade he 
operated a shop at Lawrence for a time, but for some years past has 
devoted himself to farming. He has been highway commissioner and 
a school director and is one of the leading men of his township. 

Lewis B. Palmer was reared in Chemung Township, and attended 
the common and high schools of Harvard, and then read law with Calren 
J. Hendricks of Harvard, who died November 27, 1918, just after he was 
nominated for county judge. Mr. Palmer completed his legal training 
in the Xorthwestern Indiana University, and was admitted to the bar 
of Indiana September 11, 1911, and to the Superior and Supreme courts 
June 19, 1912, and the following day, to practice in the United States 
district courts. He was admitted to the Illinois bar June 5, 1918. 
Fraternally he is a Mason. 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 77:1 

JOHN A. PARRISH. 
Page 139. 



ERNEST D. PATRICK. 

Ernest D. Patrick, president of the First National Bank of Marengo, 
and one of the sound and reliable men of McHenry County, has the 
distinction of being at the head of the finest banking establishment, 
outside of Chicago, in this part of the state. He was born at Marengo, 
January 31, 1869, a son of Richard Montgomery Patrick, a sketch of 
whom appears elsewhere in this work. 

After attending the common and high schools of Marengo, being 
graduated from the latter in 1886, he went to Lake Forest, and Phillips 
Academy of New Hampshire, from which he was graduated in 1890. 
Returning to Marengo, he became a messenger for the First National 
Bank, which his father had founded, and which is the oldest bank in 
McHenry County, and was successively promoted until he became its 
cashier, holding that position for twenty years. In 1916, when the 
office of president was vacated through the death of his father, Mr. 
Patrick was made its chief executive, having associated with him, A. C. 
Smith, cashier; C. B. Whittemore, first vice president; E. C. Robb, sec- 
ond vice president, and Charles Schofield, who, with the others, is on 
the board of directors. A stanch Republican . Mr. Patrick was elected 
mayor of Marengo, and supervisor of Marengo Township, his record 
in both offices being excellently creditable. 

In 1892 Mr. Patrick was married to Miss Leone Vail, a daughter of 
Elisha J. Vail, now deceased, a very prominent man of Marengo. Mr. 
and Mrs. Patrick have the following children: Martha L., who is Mrs. 
G. Petritz of Rockford, 111.; Frances D., who is the wife of Byron B. 
Brown of Belvidere, 111.; and Richard M., who was born January 12, 
1904. Mr. Patrick has served as president of the McHenry County 
Bankers Association, and is very active in that organization. He and 
his family belong to the Presbyterian church. His fraternal affiliations 
are with the Elks. A man of more than usual ability, he has been able 
to make a record of which anyone might well be proud, and render 
to his community a service that places its banking interests among the 
foremost in the countv. 



774 HISTORY OF McHENBY COUNTY 

HOWARD V. PATRICK. 

Howard V. Patrick, senior member of the prosperous grocery firm of 
Patrick Bros, of Marengo, is one of the leading business men of his 
city, and he and his brother own and conduct the finest equipped grocery 
establishment in the county. He was born at Marengo, September 12, 
1887, one of the six children of Francis W. and Harriet (Yandevere) 
Patrick. Francis W. Patrick was engaged in merchandising until his 
death which occurred in November, 1906, but his widow survives him 
and makes her home at Marengo. 

Howard V. Patrick attended the common and high schools of Maren- 
go, being graduated from the latter institution in 1904. Immediately 
thereafter he embarked in a grocery business, and when his father 
died, he and his brother, Harry C. Patrick, formed their present partner- 
ship. The brothers built their present building in 1915 at a cost of 
$10,000, the store they occupy being 40x80 feet. It is handsomely 
equipped, and here is carried a full and complete line of staple and fancy 
groceries aggregating $10,000. The store is at the corner of State and 
Washington streets, in the center of Marengo. Harry C. Patrick served 
in the ambulance division during the World War, in which he enlisted 
in July, 1917. 

In July, 1913, Howard V. Patrick was married to Miss Mildred 
Jackson, a daughter of William Jackson of Terre Haute, Ind. Mr. 
and Mrs. Patrick have two children, namely: Phyllis M., who was 
born May 22, 1914; and Susanne, who was born April 12, 1916. Mr. 
Patrick belongs to the Baptist church. In politics he is a Republican, 
but he has never cared for office, preferring to devote his time to his 
business affairs in which he has been so eminently successful. 



RICHARD MONTGOMERY PATRICK. 

Richard Montgomery Patrick, now deceased, was born near Tructon, 
Courtland County, N. Y., May 5, 1831, a son of Nathaniel and Penelope 
(Potter) Patrick. Both grandparents of Mr. Patrick were soldiers in 
the American Revolution and later became early settlers of Courtland 
County, N. Y. The maternal grandfather was the first settler of Cuyler, 
N. Y., the land he took up as a homestead having descended from him 
to the oldest son, and is still held in the family. 




I 




■- 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 775 

Richard M. Patrick attended the Homer Academy which has had 
as pupils such men as Lyman J. Gage, later secretary of the United 
States treasury. Very early in life Mr. Patrick began to be self-sup- 
porting, his capital being a yoke of oxen. By 1851 he had acquired 
enough to go to Iowa and take up government land. On his way, he 
stopped at Chicago, but decided that the muddy little village would 
never develop sufficiently to satisfy his ambition. Later he reversed 
his decision and invested in land there that is still a part of his estate. 
Having spent a night at Marengo, on his overland trip, he decided to 
make it his permanent home, and in 1852 settled here, going into a 
drug business with his brother-in-law, Charles Angle. Subsequently 
he established himself in a general merchandise business, in which he 
was later joined by his brother Elias, and two nephews, F. W. and H. E. 
Patrick. From this original venture have grown the stores of Woleben's 
Dry Goods Co. and the grocery firm of Patrick Bros. During the Civil 
War, he conducted a small exchange and banking business which in 
1867 was expanded into the banking house of R. M. Patrick, and in 
1871 became the First National Bank of Marengo, in which he held 
four-fifths of the capital stock. For some years prior to his death, he 
was accepted as the clean of the banking business of McHenry County. 

In 1856, Mr. Patrick was married to Miss Emma Hotchkiss Page, a 
daughter of Rev. William Page of Rockford, 111. Mr. and Mrs. Patrick 
celebrated their golden wedding anniversary in 1906, at which time 
all of the living children and grandchildren were present, the festivities 
lasting several days. Mrs. Patrick died September 19, 1913. Seven 
children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Patrick, four of whom survive, 
namely: Frederick A., who lives at Duluth, Minn.; Mrs. Newell Dwight 
Hillis, who lives at Brooklyn, N. Y.; Ernest Durand, who lives at 
Marengo; and Mrs. C. W. Moyer, who lives at Rockford, 111. Mr. 
Patrick early joined the Presbyterian church, to which he always gave 
a generous support. He was deeply interested in civic matters, and 
rendered efficient aid in promoting public movements of merit. His 
death occurred November 2, 1915. 



CLINTON C. PATTERSON. 

Clinton C. Patterson, now deceased, was one of the prominent and 
highly-regarded young business men of Marengo, and treasurer and 



776 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

general manager of the J. H. Patterson Lumber Company, extensive 
lumber, fuel and feed dealers, with home offices at Marengo, and branch 
offices at Union, Huntley, Gilberts, Roscoe, Wauconda, Rochelle and 
Freeport, 111. Associated with him were: J. H. Patterson, president; 
G. H. Perkins, vice president; and W. C. Linderman, secretary. 

Clinton C. Patterson was born at Marengo, September 16, 1889, one 
of the three children of Joseph H. and Viola (Crissy) Patterson. Clinton 
C. Patterson attended the common and high schools of Marengo, and 
the Northwestern University, where he was made a member of Beta 
Theta Phi. After completing his studies he entered his father's business, 
and continued with him until his death. The company was founded 
in 1886 by Nelson Buck, who sold the business to Mr. Patterson in 1891. 
This concern owns an elevator with a capacity of 20,000 bushels. The 
home offices are located in the Community Building at Marengo. 

Clinton C. Patterson was married September 4, 1912, at Marengo, 
to Miss Mabel Joslyn, born October 30, 1889, a daughter of E. O. 
Joslyn, a very prominent resident of McHenry County. Mr. and Mrs. 
Patterson had two children, namely: Kenrick W., and Burritt G, who 
died February 14, 1919. Mr. Patterson was a Mason, and she belongs 
to the Eastern Star. For several years he has served on the school 
board. He belonged to the Methodist Episcopal church, and was 
deservedly popular in it as elsewhere. Mr. Patterson died October 18, 
1918, and is buried in the Marengo cemetery. In his death his family 
and community sustained a heavy loss. Mrs. Patterson is also a mem- 
ber of this church. 



ALONZO S. PEAK. 



Alonzo S. Peak, now retired, is one of the substantial men of McHenry 
County, who is residing in Coral Township, near the village of the same 
name. He was born in Wayne County, Ohio, near Wooster, March 
22, 1845, a son of Christopher and Elizabeth (Colgrove) Peak, both 
of whom were born at Schoharie, N. Y., and were there married, going 
afterwards to Ohio about 1840. In 1848 the family migrated to 
McHenry County, settling in Coral Township, two and one-half miles 
west of Huntley, on wild land, that had on it a small log house. 

Christopher Peak went to work at once to clear off his land. He 
moved three times, his permanent home being west of Harmony where 
he lived until his death at the age of eighty-five years, having been 



HISTORY OF McHENBY COUNTY 777 

retired for some years prior to his passing away. His wife died at the 
age of seventy-two years. He was a Republican and a very public- 
spirited man, and one of the organizers of the Harmony Methodist 
church. Prices in the early days were not what they are today, and 
A. S. Peak distinctly remembers operating the churn for his mother's 
butter which was sold about 1855, at eight and ten cents per pound 
to pay the family's subscription to the church. The Peak family hate 
continued to attend this church ever since, but their subscription totals 
up a much larger amount than it did in 1855. At one time this church 
had a very large congregation. The parents of A. S. Peak are buried 
in the old Harmony Cemetery, kept in fine condition by the present 
members of the church. Christopher Peak and his wife had the follow- 
ing family: A. S., whose name heads this review; Eleanor, who is the 
wife of Albert Shapley of Logan, Kan.; George D., who lives at Logan, 
Kan.; William J., who lives at Colorado Springs, Colo., who are living, 
and seven who are deceased, three of the seven having passed away in 
childhood. Ursula, who became Mrs. N. Van Vleet, died at the age 
of twenty-seven years; Mindel died in young womanhood; Charles 
\Y. Peak died in childhood; and Arvilla, who also died in young woman- 
hood. 

Alonzo S. Peak remained at home until he enlisted oh September 1 7, 
1863, for service during the Civil War, in Company B, Seventeenth 
Illinois Cavalry, under Colonel Bevcridge and Captain McReynolds, 
and was sent to Alton, 111., to guard prisoners, from there being trans- 
ferred to Missouri at the time General Price made his great raid. The 
company divided, a portion going to Kansas, but his command pur- 
suing the bushwhackers in Missouri. He received his honorable dis- 
charge at the end of a year, and was not wounded or captured, and came 
out as a high private. A portion of his service consisted in the carrying 
of dispatches in which he ran considerable risk, but was not captured. 

Returning home A. S. Peak conducted his father's farm until the 
hitter's death when he bought the homestead and continued his farming 
until his retirement, after which he rented the farm, and moved to a 
small property near the village of Coral. He is secretary and treasurer 
of the Harmony Cemetery Association, and was on the school board 
for twenty-five years, and for forty-three years was township collector. 
At first his collections amounted to about $4,000, advancing to $10,000 
after the Civil War. In 1916 the taxes amounted to $150,000, the last 
year he held office. A strong Republican, for thirty-five years he has 
served his party as county committeeman, and still holds that office 



77S HISTORY OF McIIENRY COUNTY 

from Coral Township. For thirty years a justice of the peace, a school 
director for twenty-two years, and judge of election for fifty years, he 
is a well-known man in this region. 

On June 4, 1871, Mr. Peak was married to Emily E. Stevens, a sister 
of Frank Stevens, whose biography appears elsewhere, and they became 
the parents of these children: Esther Almira, who died in infancy; 
Charles N., unmarried, who lives in Coral Township; and Ernest G., 
who was struck by lightning August 15, 1919, owned the Peak home- 
stead bought by his grandfather, just prior to the Civil War, and which 
has been in the family for over sixty years. On June 3, 1921, Mr. 
and Mrs. Peak celebrated their golden wedding anniversary. Con- 
gratulations and good wishes arrived from distant friends; many beauti- 
ful and useful gifts were received, including a shower of gold pieces 
to the amount of $325. The occasion was a very happy and memorable 
one. 



ERNEST G. PEAK. 



Death comes as a shock to the survivors no matter in what form 
it terminates a useful life, but fortitude is indeed demanded when 
the blow comes from some convulsion of nature and smites down 
one in the full vigor of young manhood. Not only were the family 
and immediate friends of the late Ernest G. Peak horrified at the tragedy 
of his death, but the entire state, for seldom does such a tragedy occur. 
This most estimable young man was quietly carrying on his work as an 
agriculturalist, August 15, 1919, when he was struck by a bolt of lightning 
and instantly killed. While he and his fellow workers in a threshing 
outfit on the farm of C. A. Thompson, were aware a storm was approach- 
ing, they, as is the custom of dependable farmers, endeavored to finish 
their loading before it reached them. The horses attached to the 
wagon he was loading were also killed, but his fellow-workers were 
spared. The loss to the community was all the more deeply felt because 
of the high character of the young man, and the work he had accom- 
plished in behalf of war activities, and moral uplift. It will be a long 
time before he will be forgotten, or his useful life fail to influence for 
good those with whom he was associated while living. 

Ernest G. Peak is a native son of McHenry County as he was born 
in Coral Township, December 29, 1882. His father, Alonzo S. Peak 
is one of the leading men of the county, and the family one of the pioneer 



EISTORY OP McHENRY COUNT"? 779 

ones of this part of the state. A complete history of the Peak family is 
given elsewhere in (his work. 

After attending the graded schools of West Harmony, Ernest G. 
Peak took the high-school course at Marengo, from which he was grad- 
uated in June, 1901, and winning a scholarship in Beloit College, he 
al tended that institution for a year. He then taught school for some 
time, but feeling the urge of the soil, began farming on his own account, 
and developed into one of the progressive agriculturalists of Coral 
Township. 

On March 26, 1910, Mr. Peak was married to Miss Louise Beck- 
linger, who survives him. Their only child died in infancy. Mr. 
Peak was a young man of exemplary character and extremely active 
in reform work. It was mainly through his efforts that Coral Township 
went dry in the spring election of 1919, and he was equally zealous in 
church and Sunday school work. About twenty years ago he joined the 
Methodist Episcopal church and served as trustee, steward, treasurer, 
minuteman, Sunday school superintendent and teacher. Not long 
before his death he was elected delegate to the lay conference held at 
Chicago in the fall of 1919. 

During the late war Mr. Peak found expression for his intense 
patriotism by working steadfastly and unremittingly in behalf of the 
Red Cross, Y. M. C. A., Salvation Army and the Liberty bonds. He 
was keyman in helping to lead his church to victory in the late centenary 
movement. As a faithful and dutiful son, a loving and devoted husband, 
splendid neighbor and patriotic citizen, Ernest G. Peak measured up 
to the highest standards of American manhood, and was never found 
lacking in any of the Christian virtues. 



WALLACE B. PEATT. 



Wallace B. Peatt, one of the successful general farmers of McHenry 
County, owns and operates 120 acres of valuable land on section 14, 
Greenwood Township. Mr. Peatt was born in McHenry County, 
September 29, 1862, a son of Lewis B. Peatt, who owned a farm of 240 
acres of land in Greenwood Township, and was one of the highly esteemed 
men of his community. 

Wallace B. Peatt was reared in his native county and attended its 
schools. He was married to Nellie McDonald, born in Richmond 



780 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

Township, a daughter of James McDonald, a native of Scotland, who 
came to the United States with his parents when he was seven years 
old. The McDonald family first located at Chicago, but later came to 
McHenry County, and became farmers of Richmond Township. During 
the Civil War, James McDonald served his adopted country as a soldier. 
He was married to Rose A. Brady. Mr. and Mrs. Peatt have two 
children, namely: Floyd and Blanch. After his marriage, Mr. Peatt 
located on his present farm, and he has developed it and made it a 
valuable property. 

CHARLES C. PECK, M. D. 

Charles C. Peck, M. D., one of the leading physicians and surgeons 
of Harvard', is a man whose reputation in his profession is firmly estab- 
lished and maintained. He was born in Marengo, this county, Decem- 
ber 19, 1870, a son of Daniel E. and Eliza J. (Crego) Peck, who had 
four children. Daniel C. Peck was one of the earlier physicians of 
Marengo, where he was in active practice until his death. 

Charles C. Peck attended the common and high schools of Marengo, 
and entering the Hahnemann College and Hospital of Chicago, III., 
was graduated therefrom, after taking the full medical course, in 1895. 
Immediately thereafter he located at Marengo, leaving it for Harvard. 
He was elected coroner of McHenry County to fill the unexpired term 
of Dr. J. S. Maxon, upon the Republican ticket. Doctor Peck belongs 
to the McHenry County Medical Society, the Illinois State Medical 
Society and the American Medical Association, and also to the Western 
Roentgen X-Ray Society. His fraternal associations are with the 
Masons and Odd Fellows. 

Doctor Peck was married to Miss Clara A. Morse, who died in 
1915, leaving one daughter, Charlotte C. On February 6, 1919, he 
married Genevieve Lake, a daughter of Monroe W. and Margaret 
Lake, of Harvard. Doctor Peck and his daughter belong to the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church. He is an efficient and experienced physician, 
and his practice is a large and valuable one. As coroner he has rendered 
a very capable service to his county, being fearless in his investigations 
and wise in his decisions. 



GEORGE H. PERKINS. 

George H. Perkins, vice president and general manager of the 
J. H. Patterson Lumber Company of Marengo, dealers in lumber, 







- B Bra IT\' 



A-* A fcUL^ 



HISTORY OF McHENBY COUNTY 781 

building materials, fuel, grain and feed, is one of the leading business 
men of tliis part of McHenry County. He was born at Marengo, 
July 20, 1866, one of the three children of Samuel J. and Mary E. 
(Rodgers) Perkins. Samuel J. Perkins, who was horn in Vermont, 
came to Marengo at an early day, and there died in 1887, his wife 
having died in 18S4. They were farming people, and very highly 
respected. 

George H. Perkins attended the common and high schools of Marengo, 
and has been identified with the lumber business throughout his busi- 
ness career, rising through merit to his present position. Mr. Perkins 
was married to Miss Ada Fry, a daughter of Robert Fry, a native of 
England. Mr. and Mrs. Perkins have the following children: Robert 
H., Mary S., Lawrence I., and Isabel L. The family all belong to the 
Methodist Episcopal church, and are very active in promoting its good 
work. A stanch Republican, Mr. Perkins served Marengo as a member 
of its city council for two years, and was capable in every respect. 



HARVEY R. PERKINS. 

Harvey R. Perkins, who is living retired on his farm in Chemung 
Township, was formerly actively engaged in agricultural operations, 
and is a man well and favorably known throughout McHenry County. 
His farm is located seven miles north of Harvard, and four miles east 
of Sharon. He was born on his present farm, September 5, 1860, a son 
of Royal and Helen (Burton) Perkins. Royal Perkins was born in 
Rutland County, Vt., December 7, 1824, and died July 8, 1899, aged 
seventy-two years. He came to Illinois about 1845 with his parents, 
and acquired a farm at the time of his marriage. There was a small 
clearing with a log house on the south side of the road, and in it Harvey 
R. Perkins was born. Mrs. Perkins was a daughter of Philip Burton 
who lived on an adjoining farm. She died in young womanhood, 
leaving four children, namely: Emma, who married Robert Andrews, 
died when past sixty years of age; Mary, who married Frank Maybury, 
lives at Lockwood, Mo.; Harvey R., whose name heads this review; 
and Jay, who is a stockman of Sharon, Wis. In 1874 the father was 
married (second) to Mrs. Jane Arnold, widow of Fayette Arnold. Her 
maiden name was Willis. 

Harvey R. Perkins took possession of the homestead in 1883, and 



782 EISTORY OF McIIENRY COUNTY 

had added to it until he now has 152 acres, forty being a portion of the 
old Burton estate, and he has rebuilt and enlarged the barn, it now 
being 100 x 30 feet instead of the old dimensions of 30 x 56 feet. With 
the exception of several years spent in the Sharon cheese factory, Mr. 
Perkins has spent practically all of his life upon his farm, and takes 
great pride in it. He bought out the interest of the other heirs so as 
to own it. 

On September 5, 1881, on his twenty-first birthday, Mr. Perkins 
was married to Sarah Snowden Dean, a daughter of Archibald and 
Mary (Snowden) Dean, born in LeRoy Township, Boone County, 111., 
November 27, 1860. Mr. and Mrs. Perkins have three children, namely: 
Mary, who married Frank Barth; Grace, who married August Peterson, 
the man who is managing Mr. Perkins' farm and is in partnership with 
him, has two children, Eleanor and Gerald; and Royal, who married 
Alma Keller, a daughter of Conrad Keller, have one child, Howard. 

There are two houses on the farm, and for three years Mr. Perkins 
has lived retired in one of them, his daughter and her husband, Mr. 
Peterson, occupying the other. There are two silos, and a fine dairy 
barn for the forty-eight head of cattle of good strains. Mr. Perkins 
has one of the best rural homes in the county, and it will compare 
favorably with any city residence. This was built in 1910 and is of 
stucco, with a furnace, gas, hot and cold water, and all other modern 
conveniences. A Republican, Mr. Perkins has served as commissioner 
of the township for four years, and was on the school board for sixteen 
years. He is a man who has the courage to live up to his convictions, 
and is not afraid to let everyone know exactly how he stands with refer- 
ence to matters of public moment. The Sharon Camp, M. W. A., 
provides him with fraternal affiliations. There are few men in this 
part of the county who are held in as high esteem as he and he deserves 
the confidence he inspires. 



ALFRED C. PERRY. 



Alfred C. Perry, member of the automobile firm of Perry Bros, of 
Hebron, is recognized as one of the live and progressive men of McHenry 
County. He was born at Hebron March 17, 1863, one of the three 
children of Alfred G. and Mary C. (Fox) Perry. Alfred G. Perry was 
born in Canada, where he learned the trade of a carpenter, and after 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 7s:i 

coming to the United States, he located at Hebron, where he continued 
to work at his trade until his retirement. At present he is one of the 
highly respected men of Hebron. 

Alfred ('. Perry attended the common and high schools of Hebron, 
anil then learned the trade of a carpenter, working at it until he branched 
out as a contractor. In June; 1916, he and his brother, William E. 
Perry, formed their present firm, and now conduct a garage, and handle 
all kinds of automobile accessories and supplies. Their stock average 
about $5,000, and they do a large business, that shows a healthy increase. 

Fraternally Mr. Perry is an Odd Fellow. His political sentiments 
make him a Republican, but he has confined his public service to casting 
his vote for the candidate of his party. 



WILLIAM E. PERRY. 



William E. Perry, junior member of the firm of Perry Bros., owners 
of a garage at Hebron, and dealers in automobile accessories, is one of 
the rising young business men of this part of the county. He was born 
at Hebron, March 21, 1890, one of the three children of Alfred G. and 
Mary C. (Fox) Perry. Alfred G. Perry was born in Canada, but later 
came to the United States, and located at Hebron, where he followed 
the trade of a carpenter. He retired several years ago, and is still 
residing at Hebron. 

William E. Perry attended the common and high schools of Hebron. 
After leaving school he became a chauffeur, and after having learned 
thoroughly all about automobiles, in June, 1916, he and his brother, 
Alfred C. Perry, organized their present business. The firm carries 
a full assortment of automobile supplies, vulcanizes tires and tubes, 
and handles gasoline, oils and greases, the stock carried aggregating 
$5,000. Both young men are experienced, and their work commends 
them to the trade. 

On January 23, 1914, Mr. Perry was united in marriage with Florence 
C. Bigelow, a daughter of Seneca Bigelow. Mr. and Mrs. Perry have 
one son, William S.,' who was born August 10, 1916. Mr. and Mrs. 
Perry belong to the Methodist Episcopal church. In politics he is 
a Republican. 



784 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

JOHN PETER. 

John Peter, deceased, formerly vice president of the Algonquin 
State Bank, and a heavy stockholder in the Peter Bros. Manufacturing 
Company, both members of which are his sons, was one of the leading 
men of Algonquin. He was born in New York State, August 21, 1842, 
a son of John and Margaret (Turnbull) Peter. John Peter was born 
in Scotland, and there learned the trade of stone mason. In 1842, he 
came to the United States, and for a time followed his trade, but later 
became a farmer. He died in 1876. 

In 1869, John Peter came to McHenry County, and embarked in 
a hardware business at Algonquin, continuing it for many years. He 
was interested with other business concerns upon an extensive scale, 
until 1912, when he retired from active participation in business life, 
although he retained his stock in the Algonquin State Bank, which he 
continued to serve as vice president, and in the Peter Bros. Manu- 
facturing concern. The latter manufacture the Simplex Ironer and 
other laundry equipment, the Woodstock safety tapping chucks, auto- 
matic reversing attachments and tapping machines, and abrasive metal 
cutters. The senior member of the firm is E. C. Peter, and the junior 
is W. T. Peter, who with their sister, Grace H., are the children born 
of the marriage of John Peter and Lida M. Helm, a daughter of John 
Helm. John Helm was born in Scotland, and came to the United 
States in 1833. The Peter family belong to the Presbyterian church. 

Mr. Peter was a Republican and for twenty-seven years served 
Algonquin Township school as treasurer, and for seven years was presi- 
dent of the village board. For fifty-two years he had been a Blue 
Lodge Mason, and he also belonged to the Modern Woodmen of America. 
In 1862, Mr. Peter enlisted in defense of his country, in the Eighty- 
eighth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and served during the Civil War 
until he was honorably discharged in July, 1865. Since the organization 
of the local Grand Army Post, he had been one of its faithful members. 
There are few men who are more representative of their community's 
best interests, than Mr. Peter was, and Algonquin recognizes that it 
owes much to him. He died April 12, 1919. 



JOHN PETERS. 



John Peters, one of the substantial men of McHenry County, is 
located in Coral Township one and one-half miles south of the village 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 785 

of Coral. He was born in Pommerania, Germany, August 2, 1852, 
and was brought to the United States in 1867 by his parents, Christ 
and Elizabeth Peters. Christ Peters was a day laborer, and locating 
at Huntley, worked for others until 1874, when John Peters secured 
a farm, after which he made his home with his son until his death which 
occurred when he was seventy-two years of age, his widow dying a little 
later, at the same age. 

The only opportunities for securing an education John Peters had 
were those offered by the German public schools as he had to work 
after the family came to the United States, and or eight years was 
employed by farmers in the vicinity of Harmony, one of them being 
S. K. Williams, with whom he remained for four years. His wages 
ranged from $18 to $22 per month. By 1874, through close economy 
he had saved $1,600 from his wages, and invested it in 170 acres of land 
in Coral Township, for which he paid $30 per acre. There were some 
buildings on the farm, but only twenty-seven acres were under culti- 
vation, the balance being covered with stumps, brush and stones, and 
in the lower portions there were ponds. Since then he has drained 
the swamp, putting in five cars of tile during one season, and a lot 
more later on, redeeming in all sixty-five acres which are now the best 
he possesses. He has erected a comfortable residence, two barns, one 
36 x 80, and the other 34 x 72, with an el, and two concrete silos. Dairy- 
ing is his principal feature, he milking about thirty cows and having an 
average of twelve cans of milk each day. All in all Mr. Peters has one 
of the best improved and managed farms in McHenry County. For 
the past seven or eight years he has been handling partly thoroughbred 
Holstein cattle, and his hogs are of a high grade, he believing in good 
stock. His farm comprises the same number of acres as originally, it 
being his belief that it was better to improve what land he possessed, 
than to neglect it to add to his acreage. In politics he is a Republican, 
and has served for several terms as a road commissioner. The German 
Evangelical church at Harmony has in him one of its members, and he 
has been active in it since its organization. 

On September 17, 1874, Mr. Peters was married to Fredricks Sass, 
born in Mecklenberg, Germany, and died September 16, 1916. Mr. 
and Mrs. Peters became the parents of the following children: Bertha, 
who married Bernie Benjamin, a merchant of Coral village; Mary, who 
is at home; Minnie, who is Mrs. Charles Johns, of Coral; Alvina, who 
is Mrs. Clarence Lowdenbech, of Seneca Township; John, who is the 
junior member of the firm of Shutleff & Peters, of Marengo; Emma, 



786 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

who is at home; Florentine, who is a teacher at Chicago Heights, has 
been there for five or six years, but has taught in the Coral schools; 
George, who is at home; Walter, who is assisting in operating the home 
farm; and Dorothy, who died in infancy. 



JOHN C. PETERS. 



John C. Peters, junior member of the well known firm of Shurtleff 
& Peters, dealers in lumber, coal and feed at Hartland, is one of the pros- 
perous business men of Hartland. He was born in Coral Township, 
September 1, 1881, and is one of the nine children' of his parents, John 
and Rachel Peters. John Peters was born in Germany in 1852, and 
came to the United States at the age of sixteen years. He came direct 
to McHenry County, and worked for a short time on the farm of S. K. 
Williams of Huntley, and then located in Coral Township, where he 
is still engaged in farming. 

John C. Peters was reared in Coral Township and attended its 
schools. He remained at home until he was twenty-three years old, 
when he entered the employ of the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad 
Company as fireman, and remained with it until 1908. He then entered 
the employ of F. G. Jancke, and continued with him for two years. 
In 1911, he and Mr. Edward Shurtleff formed their present company. 
Mr. Peters being in charge of the lumber department at Hartland, and 
Mr. Shurtleff of the business at Marengo, and he is a resident of Wood- 
stock. Mr. Shurtleff is a resident of Marengo. 

Mr. Peters was married September 21, 1910, to Miss Edith A. Koch, 
a daughter of William Koch, and they have a son, John Peters, the third 
to bear that name in the Peters family. The Kochs are numbered 
among the pioneers of Coral Township, and both they and the Peters 
family are well known in this part of the state. Mr. and Mrs. Peters 
are Protestants. He is a Republican. He is justly numbered among 
the successful men of this part of McHenry County. 



KNUDE L. PETERSEN. 

Knude L. Petersen, now deceased, was formerly one of the enter- 
prising agriculturalists of McHenry County, and operated a fine farm in 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 787 

Dunham Township, five miles south of Harvard, that is the properly of 
Mrs. Peterson, and where she still resides. He was born in Norway, 
July 15, 1808, and he died on May 5, 1918. When he was sixteen years 
old he came to the United States, and went to Nebraska, where he was 
united in marriage with Margaret McMullen, who had been reared in 
the vicinity of Woodstock. She died at Whitewater, Wis., about 1906. 

After his marriage, Mr. Petersen went to Milwaukee, Wis., where he 
worked at his trade as a carpenter until after his wife's death, when 
he came to Woodstock, and was married (second) on May 28, 1913, to 
Anna Chase, and took charge of her farm. Owing to an accident when 
he fell from a building he was helping to construct at Kearney, Neb., 
Mr. Petersen was never very strong, and his death occurred while he 
was still in the prime of life. His children were as follows: Alva, who 
died at the age of twenty-two years; Fred L., who is a veteran of the 
World War; Mary Bauke, who lives at Marengo; Mabel, who was ten 
years old at the time of her father's second marriage, is now attending 
the Harvard High School, and living with Mrs. Petersen; and Jessie, 
who died at the age of seven years. 

Mrs. Petersen is the daughter of Samuel and Hannah (Thomas) 
Chase, and granddaughter of Alva Chase of St. Lawrence County, 
N. Y., where both he and his wife were born. Samuel Chase was 
twelve years old when his parents came to Illinois in 1842, and the 
grandparents also came to McHenry County, and the Wells family 
were also of the party. They all secured government land, and the pres- 
ent farm of Mrs. Petersen was a part of what the Chase family took 
up. At that time it was all covered with heavy timber and great, 
stones were found below the surface so that it was a heavy task to 
clear off the farm and make possible the putting in of crops. Alva Chase 
died on this farm in 1885, aged eighty-three years, having been born 
in 1802, surviving his wife, whose maiden name had been Minerva 
Thompson, for nine years. Their only child was Samuel Chase, who 
was born May 6, 1830, and he died in September, 1912. His wife was 
also born in Lawrence County, N. Y., and she was eleven years old when 
brought by her aunt, Mrs. Jonathan Wells to McHenry County. Her 
father died when she was five years old. Mrs. Chase lived with her 
aunt until her marriage. Her mother later joined the Wells family, 
having in the meantime married (second) William Gray, and later 
moved to Kansas, leaving her daughter behind her. After his marriage 
Samuel Chase settled on his farm in the house he had provided for his 
bride, which still stands, although enlarged, and remodeled. Although 
he carried on farming all his life, Samuel Chase also operated a black- 



788 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

smith shop for Cyrus Allen, about one-quarter of a mile away from 
his home. Samuel Chase and his wife had two children, namely: 
Hartson, who died in 1914, on a farm adjoining that of Mrs. Petersen, 
which his family has later so'd; and Mrs. Petersen. She was born on 
her present farm, December 8, 1858, and has spent her entire life here. 
She rents her farm, and lives alone, keeping several cows, three horses 
and five varieties of chickens, Light Brahmas, White Orpingtons, 
Rhode Island Red, Buff Rock and Plymouth Rock, and White and 
Buff Leghorns. She is very fond of animals. There is quite a lot of 
fruit on her place. While she is not a member of any of the neighbor- 
hood clubs, she is very well informed, keeping herself posted through 
the papers to which she subscribes and finds interest and enjoyment in 
her home and surroundings. 



LOUIS PETERSON. 



Louis Peterson, one of the enterprising farmers of Dunham Town- 
ship, is located on the old Jerome farm, which his wife inherited from 
her grandfather. The founder of the Jerome family in McHenry 
County was Jason N. Jerome, a native of Vermont, who came to 
McHemy County in 1836, entering land from the government in Dun- 
ham Township, and here Jason N. Jerome died in 1892. He and his 
wife had one son, Nelson C. Jerome, who was born April 8, 1831, in 
Vermont, and he died September 18, 1889, on the old homestead, having 
spent his life in farming. 

On December 25, 1852, Nelson C. Jerome was united in marriage 
with Harriet E. Blodgett, born November 14, 1833, a daughter of 
Abiel D. Blodgett, who was born near Concord, Massachusetts, April 
24, 1794, and he was married November 16, 1820, to Susan Richmond, 
born at Lenox, Mass., October 19, 1795. He died September 14, 1861, 
and she October 21, 1866. The Blodgett home in Alden Township, 
two miles east of Harvard, is the one bought when the family came to 
McHenry County in 1845. One of the sons of Abiel Blodgett, Delos 
Blodgett, left McHenry County in young manhood, and going to the 
lumber woods worked his way up until he became one of the millionaires 
of Grand Rapids, Mich. At one time he was one of the pine landowners 
and lumbermen of Michigan, and associated with him was Delos Diggins, 
who also made a fortune. The Delos Diggins Library at Harvard is 
named in honor of the latter. 



>] 



HISTORY OP McHENRY COUNTY 789 

Nelson C. Jerome bought a farm adjoining the Blodgetl homestead, 

and divided his time between it and his father's farm, but his death 
occurred on the latter. His wife survived him until February 10, 
1901, when she passed away at the home of her daughter. There 
were three children in the Jerome family, namely: Howell Richmond, 
who is a retired farmer of Walworth, Wis.; Helen C, who is a" maiden 
lady living at Harvard; and Katie C, who is Mrs. Louis Peterson. 

Katie C. Jerome was born on the old Jerome farm, January 19, 
1856, and she was married July 5, 1887, to Louis Peterson. He was 
born July 2, 1864, in Denmark, and at the age of sixteen years came to 
the United States with his parents, who stopped a time at Chicago, 
and then went to Monroe County, Wis., where several of their children 
still reside. Louis Peterson came to McHenry County in 1882, and 
worked at his trade as a mason for one or two years, and then went on 
the farm of Jason N. Jerome as a tenant. Still later he went to Chicago 
and was engaged there in contracting for mason work for fifteen years. 
Since 1901 he has lived on the old Jerome farm, buying out some of the 
other heirs in 1908, although Mrs. Peterson's sister still retains an 
interest in it. The Jerome farm comprises 271 acres of land, 231 in 
Dunham Township, just south of Harvard, and forty acres in TIartland 
Township. Dairying is the principal industry, thirty cows being 
milked. Mr. Peterson has recently built a silo and large barn, and has 
made other improvements, having everything in fine condition. • 

Mr. and Mrs. Peterson have one child: Eva, who married Ralph 
Marshall, a member of the firm of Marshall Bros, of Harvard, has one 
daughter, *' >na Katherine. Prior to her marriage Eva Peterson was 
a vocal music teacher and for a number of years has been the leading 
soprano singer in the Presbyterian church of Harvard. She takes 
great pride in being connected with two such old and honored families 
as the Jeromes and Blodgetts, and has every reason for it, as they are 
justly numbered among the most representative of those who have made 
McHenry County what it is today. 



JOSEPH F. PICHEN. 



Joseph F. Pichen, one of the most public-spirited men of Cary 
Station, is extensively interested in agriculture. He was born in 
McHenry County, March 18, 1872, one of the seven children of his 
parents. Frank and Antonia (Janek) Pichen. Frank Pichen was a 



790 HISTORY OF McHENBY COUNTY 

Bohemian by birth, but came to the United States in young manhood 
and lived at < Ihicago and in Kane County, prior to locating in McHenry 
County, where he was engaged in farming until his death which occurred 
in 1882. His widow survived him, dying in McHenry County in 1918. 

Joseph F. Pichen attended the common and high schools of McHenry 
County, and learned the trade of a blacksmith, and he also learned that 
of a butcher. For the past twenty-five years he has been engaged 
in raising cattle, his fine farm being located on the outskirts of Cary, 
and his stock transactions amount to about $20,000 annually. 

In 1900 Mr. Pichen was married to Miss Celia Kutbla, a daughter 
of James Kutbla of McHenry County, and they have the following 
children: Stanley, Lillian, Elmer and Joseph. The family all belong 
to the Catholic church. Mr. Pichen is a Republican, and was first 
elected mayor of Cary Station in 1914, and re-elected in 1916. He 
built for the city the substantial town hall in 1917, at a cost of $5,100, 
and bought the property adjoining the hall for a city park. Mr. Pichen 
has been instrumental in securing many improvements for the city, and 
owns a large amount of property, and deals quite extensively in city 
real estate and farms. His fraternal connections are with the Odd 
Fellows and Woodmen of the World. A man of unusual energy and 
business ability, he has not only conducted his own affairs in such a 
manner as to win a comfortable fortune, but he has given to his city the 
benefit of his knowledge and experience, and under his wise administra- 
tion. Cary Station made remarkable progress in every respect. 



ELLEN HYDE PIERCK. 

Ellen Hyde Pierce, widow of John Pierce, is the last survivor of the 
nine children born to David W. and Dolly (Church) Hyde, natives of 
Yermont and New York, respectively, who were married in the latter 
state. Mrs. Pierce was born at Hampton, Washington County, N. Y., 
March 19, 1832, and when she was thirteen years of age, her parents 
came to Illinois by way of the Erie Canal and the Great Lakes, landing 
first at Racine, Wis., from whence they came to Kenosha. Her father 
had previously visited McHenry County, and later secured government 
land near Lake Geneva, in Walworth County, which was covered with 
timber. At that time there were only three families in the neighbor- 
hood. Still later the Hyde family came to Hebron Township; and the 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 791 

parents spent their last years with their youngest son who lived west 
of Hebron. 

Ellen Hyde was married April 26, 1857, to John Pierce, horn May 
10, 1833, in Herkimer County, N. Y., but in an early day was brought 
to McHenry County by his parents who settled on a farm west of 
Hebron, Mrs. Pierce's house being located on a part of this farm. It 
was on this farm that John Pierce died December 4, 1884, having just 
completed a fine barn that is still standing, as is the house he built two 
years previously. Mr. and Mrs. Pierce had two sons, namely: Lyman 
Zenar, who was born November 13, 1864, lives at Hebron, married 
Delia Conn, a daughter of George Conn, has one son, Howard; and 
Perry Oliver, who was born April 7, 1867, is a conductor on the Chicago 
& North Western Railroad at Chicago, for which he has worked since 
he was seventeen years old. He has been a conductor for twenty-three 
years and his run is now between Chicago and Clinton, Iowa. His 
residence is No. 3112 Washington Boulevard, Chicago. On April 26, 
1893, Perry Oliver Pierce was married to Mamie Burns of Belvidere, 
111. There are no children. 



JOHN PIERCE, SR. 



John Pierce, Sr., one of the oldest farmers of McHenry County, 
and a man widely and favorably known, owns and operates 120 acres 
on section 24, Greenwood Township. He was born in Litchfield County, 
Conn., June 5, 1828, a son of Bethel B., also born in Connecticut, as 
was his father before him. The paternal grandfather of John Pierce, 
Si., served his country as a soldier in the War of 1812. 

Growing up in his native state, John Pierce, Sr., attended its schools 
and there learned to be a practical farmer. He was married in New 
York state, to Electa Hinman, bom in New York, April 27, 1829, 
a daughter of Elijah Hinman, who was born in Connecticut. After their 
marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Pierce spent three years in Connecticut, five 
years in Pennsylvania, and then went to New York state. In 186S, 
they came to Illinois, settling on their present farm in Greenwood 
Township. They had nine children born to them, of whom the follow- 
ing six survive: Nellie M., who is Mrs. William Allen; John W.; Mattie, 
who is Mrs. Charles Abbott; Arthur C; Edgar H.; Rena, who is Mrs. 
Francis Abbott; while those who died are as follows: Hattie, who was 



792 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

Mrs. Henry Howard, died at the age of forty years; Arthur, who died 
at the age of five years; and Adgar, who died at the age of three years. 
Mr. Pierce has been a life long Democrat. During his long and active 
life in McHenry County, Mr. Pierce has been associated with much 
of its material development, and has won and retains the confidence 
and respect of his neighbors. 



LYMAN PIERCE. 



Lyman Pierce, now deceased, was probably one of the best known 
men in this section of Illinois, and also in Wisconsin, where he spent 
sixty-five years of his useful life engaged in farming. He owned a fine 
farm in Hebron Township on the state line between Illinois and Wis- 
consin, two miles north of the village of Hebron, but he died September 
30, 1911, at Hebron to which village he had moved in 1889. He erected 
the house now occupied by his daughter, Mrs. John P. Wickham, in 
1904. His wife, Maria, died at Hebron, January 30, 1911. When he 
went to the village he lived in the old house built by his father, who 
had died in it. 

Lyman and Maria Pierce became the parents of the following chil- 
dren: Hattie, who is Mrs. John P. Wickham of Hebron, owns a portion 
of her father's farm, now included in the village of Hebron, on which 
she was reared, although she was born in Lynn Township, Walworth 
County, Wis.; John, who died in June, 1900, aged thirty-three years, 
had gone to Montana, and from there to Mariposa, Cal., in search of 
a climate that would agree with him, but in vain, and he died there, 
unmarried; and May, who died in infancy. The Pierce family is con- 
nected by marriage with a number of the other important families of 
McHenry County, all of whom played their part in the development 
of this section of the state. 



SILAS W. PIERCE. 



Silas W. Pierce, a skillful blacksmith and carpenter, and one of the 
substantial men of Spring Grove, was born in Burton Township, two 
miles east of Spring Grove, March 22, 1849, a son of Marvel N. and 
Eleanor (White) Pierce, natives of Susquehanna County, Pa., and 
Tioga County, N. Y., respectively. After their marriage, in 1838, 
Marvel N. Pierce and his wife came to La Salle County, 111., and after 



HISTORY OP McHENRY COUNTY 793 

two years spent there, located in Burton Township, which he had pre- 
viously visited. Job Pierce, a brother of Marvel N. Pierce, went to 
( 'alifornia in 1854, and died there. 

Marvel N. Pierce was a fanner and spent his life on his farm with 
the exception of his military service during the Civil War, he enlisting 
in the Ninety-fifth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, from which he was trans- 
ferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps on account of disability, and after 
three years was discharged. His death resulted from the effects of his 
service, he passing away in May, 1878, aged sixty-four years. His 
widow survived him until she was sixty-nine. Their children were as 
follows: William; Hiram, who was killed in the Civil War; Perlina, 
who lives at Hebron; and Silas W., whose name heads this review. 
The remaining children are deceased. The old farm is now owned by 
11. ('. Sweet. 

Silas W. Pierce remained at home until thirty years old and then, 
in 1877, he was married to Lizzie M. Rix, of Volo, Lake County, 111., 
but living in Nunda Township, a daughter of Samuel and Marian 
Rix, who was nineteen years old at the time of her marriage. Follow- 
ing his marriage, Silas* W. Pierce conducted the homestead for a time, 
then rented land. Still later he opened a carpenter and blacksmith 
shop at Spring Grove, and has since operated it with the exception of 
two years spent in Marinette County, Wis., to which he went in 1908. 
In 1911 Mr. Pierce was married (second) to Mrs. Mary Potter, nee 
Barrus, widow of Charles Potter, a farmer of Volo, III. By his first 
marriage Mr. Pierce had the following children: Edna, who is Mrs. • 
H. A. Colby of Waukegan, 111., has three children, Mildred, Elsie and 
Arthur; James, who is a farmer of Wheeling, 111., married Clara Ander- 
son, who died and left two children, Edwin and Emily, and then lie 
married (second) Mrs. Martha Blanchard, and they have one daughter, 
Reta Marie; and Mark, who is a farmer of Burton Township, married 
Minnie Seigslaugh, and has two sons, Clarence and Allen. Mr. Pierce 
holds no offices, never having entered politics. Fraternally he belongs 
to the Modern Woodmen of America. A man of high character, Mr. 
Pierce enjoys the respect of his neighbors, and is a representative citizen. 



CHARLES C. PINGRY. 



Charles C. Pingry, now deceased, was for many years a man of 
importance in Algonquin and Coral townships, and is remembered 



794 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

with great respect by those who had the honor of his acquaintance. 
He was born at Danbury, N. H., September 7, 1818, and he died at 
Crystal Lake, 111., April 3, 1904. He was a son of True Pingry, a native 
of New Hampshire, who was married to a Miss White, also of New 
Hampshire. As a lad Charles C. Pingry was taken to Erie County, 
N. Y., where he attended school, and in 1858 was brought to Illinois, 
his parents settling two miles northeast of Nunda, in Nunda Township, 
on land entered from the government. Here the mother died while 
still a young woman, but the father survived her many years, passing 
away at the age of ninety-three years, having sold his farm and moved 
to Wisconsin where his last years were spent. Charles C. Pingry was 
the only one of his sons to remain in McHenry County, the others 
going to Wisconsin with their father. 

On April 28, 1845, C. C. Pingry was married to Eunice Johnson, 
born June 2, 1825, at Concord, N. H. When only fifteen years old 
she became a teacher, and in 1841 went to Lapeer County, Mich., to 
teach school, joining a sister at that point. The following year this 
sister, Martha, with her husband, Charles Warner, brought her to 
Nunda Township, and there she continued teaching school until her 
marriage. 

Mr. and Mrs. Pingry settled, after their marriage, on the farm 
now owned by their son, John, two miles east of Crystal Lake, in Algon- 
quin Township. In 1889 they went to the village of Nunda, now 
Crystal Lake, where Mr. Pingry operated a hotel that is now conducted 
by their son, Sumner, which was then known as the Pingry Hotel. 
In 1900 Mr. Pingry retired, and he died four years later, his wife sur- 
viving him until October 27, 1906. The operation of the hotel at Nunda 
was not his first venture in this line of business for during the Civil War 
he conducted what had been the Algonquin Hotel at the village of Algon- 
quin, giving it his own name, and he operated it for twenty years. 
A strong temperance man, he would not permit the selling of any liquor 
in a day when this branch of the hotel business was an important feature, 
:i ml a bar was to be found in almost every hostelry. All his life he fought 
to secure prohibition, and although a Republican, he voted the Pro- 
hibition ticket. It was the initial work of such men as he, carried on 
under the worst of discouragements, which made possible the late legis- 
lation which closed the saloons of the country. 

When he and his bride settled on their farm, their first house was 
built of logs, but later they erected one of cobblestones, secured princi- 
pally from the shore of Lake Michigan, and it stands and is a landmark 



HISTORY OF McIIFXRY COUNTY 795 

for the surrounding country. This remarkable house is in a magnificent 
stale of preservation and is occupied by John Pingry. 

Mr. and Mrs. Pingry had the following children: Ellen, who married 
.lames Kee, died November (i, 1017, in the village of Crystal Lake; 
Mary, who is Mrs. Henry A. Rowley, lives at Crystal Lake; Sumner, 
who is proprietor of the Pingry Hotel at Crystal Lake; John, who is 
operating the old farm; and Frank, who was a resident of Crystal Lake, 
died at the age of thirty-five years. Travelers through McHenry 
County between 1860 and 1900 became well acquainted with the excel- 
lent service given by the Pingrys, and sought to so regulate their trips so 
as to make their stopovers at the hotel conducted by Mr. and Mrs. 
Pingry, where they knew they would find comfortable beds, delicious 
meals and a genial hospitality that made them guests, rather than mere 
inmates of the house. 



JOHN PINGRY'. 



John Pingry, one of the successful farmers and representative citizens 
of McHenry County, is engaged in farming two and one-half miles east 
of Crystal Lake, in Algonquin Township, this being the old homestead 
of his father, Charles Christian Pingry, a sketch of whom appears else- 
where in this work. John Pingry was born on his present farm, and in 
the house he now occupies, January 11, 1861. This house which is 
one of the oldest in the township, is built of cobblestones and is today 
a monument to the skill of the masons of sixty years ago. It was about 
a year old when John Pingry was born, and he is very much attached 
to it as it has sheltered him all his life. His father operated a hotel 
and also lived at Crystal Lake, but continued his farm until his retire- 
ment over sixteen years ago, when he settled permanently at Crystal 
Lake, and there he and his wife passed away, he dying at eighty-six 
years of age, and she surviving him for several years. One of their 
sons, Sumner Pingry, now operates the National Hotel at Crystal Lake. 
The two sons and a daughter, Mary, who is Mrs. Henry Rowley of 
( rystal Lake, are the only survivors of the family of C. C. Pingry. 

John Pingry grew up on the farm, and as he displayed an agricultural 
bent, his father deeded to him forty acres of it before his death, and since 
then John Pingry bought the balance, now having 100 acres, all of 
which his father had entered from the government. Originally it was 
covered with timber. It is now all cleared and well drained, and here 



796 -HISTORY OF McHENBY COUNTY 

Mr. Pingry carries on dairying, keeping about twenty, cows of^the 
Holstein strain. His barn was built in 1910 by him, and is 34 x 80 
feet, twenty-four feet in height, with a full basement, all cemented, 
which is used for dairy purposes. His thirty-six foot well is never 
pumped dry. The entire premises show the effect of careful manage- 
ment and hard work, and Mr. Pingry has every reason to be proud of 
it and the results of his efforts. 

When he was thirty-three years old, Mr. Pingry was married to 
Mary A. Anderson, of Wauconda, Lake County, 111. They have two 
children, namely: George Clinton, who is assisting his father with the 
farm; and Grace Hazel, who married Paul E. Slotman, has no children, 
and lives in Crystal Lake. Mr. Pingry belongs to the Modern Wood- 
men of America and the Mystic Workers of the World, and is popular 
in both organizations, as he is in his community, for he is a man whose 
characteristics command friendship and esteem. 



WILLIAM PINNOW. 



William Pinnow, president of the Home State Bank of Crystal 
Lake, is one of the sound, conservative and reliable men of McHenry 
County, and one upon whose judgment the utmost confidence is placed. 
He was born in Germany, November 12, 1857, one of the seven children 
of Charles and Fredericka (Engel) Pinnow, also natives of Germany, 
who came to the United States when William Pinnow was sixteen years 
old. They were farming people. 

William Pinnow began farming in McHenry County in 1873, and 
continued along that line with marked success until 1896, when he 
embarked in a mercantile business at Crystal Lake, and continued it 
for nine years, then selling to become a banker. His first entry into the 
banking world was in connection with the old Citizens' Bank, but in 
1915, he, with others organized the Home State Bank of Crystal Lake, 
of which he was made president, and he has since continued to hold 
that office. The building which houses this bank was erected in 1915, 
and is thoroughly modern in every respect. 

In 1878, Mr. Pinnow was married to Miss Fredericka Reddersdorf, 
a daughter of Joseph Reddersdorf, who came to the United States in 
1868. The family all belong to the Lutheran church. In politics he 
is a Republican. A man of the highest standing in his community, 



HISTORY OK McHENRY COUNTY 797 

his connection with his bank is additional guarantee of its financial 
soundness and that the interests of the depositors will he safeguarded 
in every respect. 



ALONZO PLATT. 
Page 137. 

PHINEAS W. PLATT. 
Page 136. 

ELEAZAR L. POMEROY. 

Eleazar L. Pomeroy, now deceased, was one of the early settlers of 
Algonquin Township and one of the very prominent men of his time 
and locality. He was born at Granville, Mass., October 19, 1825, and 
in 1837 came with his family to Lacon, 111., where he learned the cooper- 
ing trade. At the age of twenty-five years he went to Chicago where 
he and his brother established the house of S. B. Pomeroy & Co. They 
owned two large grain elevators and a fleet of ships carrying grain 
between Chicago and Buffalo. Both were charter members of the 
( liicago Board of Trade and active in that body. 

In 1869 Mr. Pomeroy moved to Crystal Lake and bought from Mr. 
Baldwin, what is now the "Clow Farm." In 1871 he purchased of 
James T. Pierson a large acreage in the center of Crystal Lake, on which 
he specialized in dairying. Prior to his death in 1899, this farm was 
divided into city lots, but the home place including about seven acres 
was retained and is now the property of his only surviving son, Edward. 

Mr. Pomeroy was married December 22, 1863, at Salem, N. Y., 
to Mary Frances Hastings, the daughter of David and Clymenda 
(Weston) Hastings. They were the parents of the following children: 
Frank Hastings, Louise and Edward Dwight. Mr. Pomeroy was a 
Congregationalist, and a strong Republican. In every relation of life 
he lived up to his ideals of good citizenship and earned and held the 
■vspect and regard of all who knew him. 



798 HISTORY OP McHENRY COUNTY 

EMMETT D. POYER, 

Emmett D. Poycr, now deceased, was for a number of years a pros- 
perous farmer of McHenry County, but for some time prior to his death 
was living at Marengo, and there discharging the duties of tax collector. 
He was the eldest son of Delos and Lydia (Merriman) Poyer, and 
grandson of John Poyer, of New York, who brought his family to Mc- 
Henry County. He located on the farm now owned by Frank Curtis, 
and later acquired two other farms, owning in all about 800 acres in a 
body, all of which he entered from the government at $6 per acre. 

Emmett D. Poyer was born February 4, 1861, on the homestead of 
his grandfather, John Poyer, and remained on it until his marriage, April 
13, 1888, to Viva Wright, a daughter of C. P. and Mary (Lyon) Wright, 
natives of Jo Daviess County, 111., who came to McHenry County in 
1872 and located on a farm adjoining that owned by the Poyers, so that 
Emmett D. Poyer and Viva Wright were neighbors. For several years 
after his marriage Mr. Poyer worked for his father, and then bought 
the 100-acre Walter Parker farm on which he lived for seventeen years, 
later adding to it the Hereley farm, so that he had 280 acres for which 
he paid $50 per acre. He rebuilt the house, erected a new barn and 
silo, and put his property in fine condition in every respect. With the 
exception of $2,000 he inherited, Mr. Poyer made all he owned, and 
was a very successful man. For some years he devoted himself to 
dairying and kept a herd of twenty-five cows. His death occurred 
when he was in the very prime of life, March 22, 1917. He had come 
to Marengo in March, 1910, and was here discharging the duties per- 
taining to the office of tax collector when his health failed, he took to 
his bed, and passed away a week later, just one day before his youngest 
daughter was eighteen years old. His farm is now operated by his son. 
Mr. and Mrs. Poyer had the following family: Clarence Wright, who 
is operating the farm, married Mary Sheahan, and their children arc, 
Dorothy and Helen; and Mildred, Evelyn, and Mabel A., who are 
graduates of the Marengo High School. Mabel A. studied at Miami 
University, at Miami, Ohio, and both sisters are now engaged in teaching 
at Belvidere. Mr. Poyer served on the school board in his home dis- 
trict, and was active in community matters, and always supported the 
candidates and principles of the Republican party. For many years 
he was a leading factor and earnest member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church at Marengo, and Mrs. Poyer is still connected with it, and is a 
teacher in the Sunday school and on the official board, and has been a 



HISTORY OP McHENRY COUNTY 799 

member of the Home Missionary Society for seven years, as well as of 
other clubs connected with her church and community. During the 
late war, Mrs. Poyer devoted her energies to Red Cross work, and 
accomplished much in behalf of the cause. Mr. Poyer belonged to the 
Knights of Pythias, was keeper of the records and seals of that order, 
and was honored by his brethren. Mrs. Poyer belongs to the Eastern 
Star. 



C. W. PRESCOTT. 



C. W. Prescott, one of the substantial business men of Marengo, 
is one of the leading nurserymen of McHenry County, and a man 
widely known outside of his local region. He was born at Naperville, 
DuPage County, 111., September 26, 1851, a son of Horace Prescott, 
who was born in Orleans County, Vt., and came to Illinois in 1847, 
settling on a farm near Downer's Grove, in DuPage County. His 
mother later was married (second) to B. Cad}', and in 1865 the family 
moved to Coral Township, McHenry County, locating on a farm a few 
miles east of Marengo. 

When he was sixteen years old G. W. Prescott began working for 
E. H. Skinner of Marengo, and gradually worked up in the nursery busi- 
ness until he now has one of the leading establishments of its kind in 
the count.y. He has been called upon to serve the public in several 
official capacities, and was ten years a member of the city council of 
Marengo, and for sixteen years was on the school board. 

On December 22, 1872, C. W. Prescott was united in marriage with 
Anna Rogers, a daughter of one of his old partners, and she bore him 
two children, namely: William Horace, and Orson Raymond, a mechani- 
cal engineer of Chicago. On October 3, 1901, Mr. Prescott was married 
to Mrs. Lottie (Winslow) Halcomb, a native of New York, who had 
come to Marengo with her parents Abraham and Martha Winslow, 
and her first husband, the latter dying a few weeks after the arrival 
of the party at Marengo. Mrs. Halcomb was a music teacher and for 
several years served as organist in the Methodist Episcopal church. 
Mr. and Mrs. Winslow's last years were passed with Mr. and Mrs. 
Prescott. 

Mr. Prescott is one of the most popular men in McHenry County. 
He has learned the secret of successful dealing. His affable nature 



800 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

emphasizes the training he has received during his long contact with 
the public, and he makes friends readily and retains them to the end. 
He adheres to the policy of honest dealing and true representation of 
facts, and has a clientele that no blandishments of volatile agents have 
drawn from him. His customers know that from him they can always 
be sure of receiving the right kind of a deal, and that he will not repre- 
sent his goods as other than the.y are. In public life he enjoys the 
same confidence from his constituents, and naturally is proud of the 
record he has made in having been returned to office so many times. 
Voters do not support men time after time in whom they have not 
explicit confidence. 



JOHN D. PRINGLE. 



John D. Pringle, a stock dealer of Marengo, and one of the enter- 
prising men of McHenry County, was born two and one-half miles 
northwest of Marengo, on the river road, February 3, 1855, a son of 
Patterson and Isabel (Donaldson) Pringle, who came to McHenry County 
in 1848. A sketch of Patterson Pringle appears elsewhere in this work. 

Until he was twenty-six years old, John D. Pringle remained on his 
father's farm, and was then married to Nellie O. Watson of Greenwood 
Township. At that time Mr. Pringle bought a farm adjoining that of 
his father, and lived there until his first wife died. He was married 
(second) to Mrs. Margaret (Swanson) Livingston, an orphan, and 
moved to Marengo. For forty years Mr. Pringle has been a stock 
shipper, working in partnership with his father, and practically confines 
his shipments to stock for Chicago markets for feeding purposes. He 
does not breed stock, using his farm only for feeding. Aside from 
serving on the school board, he has not taken any part in politics. 
For thirty years Mr. Pringle has been a Woodman. 

By his first marriage Mr. Pringle had the following children: Madge, 
who was graduated from the Northwestern School of Pharmacy, mar- 
ried Bert Moore of Los Angeles, Cal., took a course as an optometrist 
at Chicago, and for some time carried on her calling in a drug store 
at Marengo, but is now practicing at Los Angeles, her husband also 
being an optometrist; Gretchen, who was graduated from the State 
Normal School of California, was a teacher in California and Arizona, 
and prior to going west had taught in McHenry County, but she is 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 801 

now Mrs. Ralph Jaycox and lives at Phoenix, Ariz.; Dorothy, who 
was graduated from the University of Wisconsin, taught in McHenry 
County, and is now a resident of San Francisco, Cal.; and Jeannette, 
who was graduated from the State Normal School at DeKalb, III., 
was a teacher at Missoula, Mont., married C. L. Busher, and lives 
near Boston, Mass., all of whom are living and two sons who are deceased, 
namely: Harold and Patterson, who died in childhood. By his second 
marriage there were two children: Margaret, who studied music at 
Stuart's Hall at Staunton, Va., is now at La Salle Seminary; and John 
D., Jr., who is in the Marengo High School. 

The present residence of the Pringle family was erected by Doctor 
Mesick about 1860, and occupied it until his death. It is a very comfort- 
able house and has long been a social center for a delightful circle 
gathered from the best people of the county. Mrs. Pringle made a 
tour of Europe in 1910, visiting the leading points of interest, including 
Rome, Venice, Berlin, London and Paris, and was in the Mirror Room 
at Versailles in which was held the Peace Conference in 1919. 



PATTERSON PRINGLE. 

Patterson Pringle, now deceased, who was for years one of the 
leading farmers and stockmen of McHenry County, owned a large 
amount of land in the vicinity of Marengo, and played an important 
part in the history of that village. He was born in Scotland, and when 
he was sixteen years old came to the United States from Glasgow, 
accompanied by his brother George, with whom he was long associated 
in business. On reaching New York City, Patterson Pringle set out 
for Kentucky. At that time the water in the Ohio River was so low 
that no steamer could operate, so the brothers hired a flatboat and 
poled their way to Maysville, Ky., and there spent four years, leaving 
it for the lead mines near Galena, 111., where Patterson Pringle made 
enough to pay for his land. 

In the meanwhile, when he was twenty-eight 3'ears old, he was mar- 
ried at Polo, 111., to Isabel Donaldson, born in Canada, and in 1848 
they came to McHenry County. His sister Margaret, then Mrs. John 
Wilson, had located near Marengo in 1840, and Patterson and George 
Pringle bought land on the river road. George Pringle lived on his 



802 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

farm practically the remainder of his life, and only left it late in life 
to live at Marengo, where he died when about eighty. None of George 
Pringle's children now live in McHenry County. A brother-in-law of 
Patterson Pringle went to California in 1849, leaving his wife and 
children in the care of Patterson Pringle, but made nothing. After his 
return, however, he went into a mercantile business and developed 
into a prosperous merchant. 

Upon coming to McHenry County Patterson Pringle bought 132 
acres, and entered forty acres, and after the close of the Civil War 
he bought 100 acres more, making 272 acres in all, his farm extending 
from the Kiswaukee River to beyond the River road, and this property 
was sold about 1911. On it he erected good buildings, and made suit- 
able improvements. In addition to carrying on dairying, he fed live 
stock, and bought the first Poland-China hogs in the county, and bred 
them for many years. While he was not an exhibitor, he produced 
some very fine animals which were exhibited by others. Mr. Pringle 
was also a buyer and shipper of stock, doing a larger business than 
any other man in his line in McHenry County. His shipments covered 
a wide area and included Capron and Darlington, Wis. For ten years 
prior to his demise, he was retired, but he continued to live on his 
farm. For twenty-four years he was commissioner of highways, and 
at last refused to hold the office any longer on account of his age. A 
charter member of the Presbyterian church, he served it as an elder 
for many years. His death occurred September 7, 1910, when he was 
eighty-eight years old having been born October 30, 1S22. His wife, 
born March 28, 1830, died November 15, 1910. In his family he was 
a strict disciplinarian, and carried his views as to Sabbath breaking 
to such lengths as to refuse to read a Sunday paper. His oldest daughter, 
Isabella Jane, is the widow of Frank N. Elliott, who died August 6, 
1907, as the result of a breakdown superinduced by a railroad wreck. 
She had no children, and is now living with her sister Mrs. Echternach, 
the two using their share of the father's estate to purchase fifty acres 
bordering Marengo, three blocks from Main Street. Mrs. Echternach 
is the wife of Daniel E. Echternach, of Marengo, a rural free delivery 
carrier, whose sketch appears elsewhere in this work, as does that of 
John D. Pringle, the son, and former partner of Patterson Pringle. 
Another daughter of Patterson Pringle, Rachel Elizabeth, was the first 
wife of Doctor Casely. 



HISTORY OF McIIFA'RY COUNTY 803 

HORACE M. PROUTY. 

Horace M. Prouty, a retired farmer of Hebron, was formerly one of 
the enterprising and highly successful agriculturalists of McHenry 
County, and he is now one of t ho oldest residents of the community in 
which he lives. He was horn in Vermont, January 22, 1837, a son of 
Louis and Sarah (Werner) Prouty. Louis Prouty was also born in 
Vermont, where he owned a large farm, and was engaged in conducting 
it all of Iris active life. His death occurred in Vermont in 18(50. He 
had twelve children born to him. 

Horace M. Prouty attended the common schools of his native stale, 
and in 18G3 came to McHenry County, locating in Hebron Township, 
where for a number of years he was actively engaged in farming. Later 
lie began the manufacture of cheese, and carried on that line of business 
until his retirement from active life, at which time he sold his cheese 
factory, and located at Hebron. 

On April 7, 1857, Mr. Prouty was united in marriage to Miss Marie 
Jane Coon, a daughter of Emory Coon, and a member of an old and highly 
respected family of Albany, N. Y., where the marriage ceremony was 
performed. Mr. and Mrs. Prouty became the parents of fourteen 
children. Mr. Prouty and his family belong to the Methodist Episcopal 
church. Politically Mr. Prouty is a Republican, but he has not cared 
to go before the public as a candidate for office. A high-principled 
man, Mr. Prouty has lived up to what he believed was right and just, 
and enjoys the confidence and esteem of all who know him. 



JOHN E. PUFAHL. 



John E. Pufahl, manager of the West McHenry plant of the Borden 
Company, is one of the substantial business men of McHenry County, 
and is held in the highest respect by all who know him. He was born in 
Wisconsin, October 11, 1880, one of the eight children of August and 
Kate (Eckes) Pufahl. August Pufahl was born in Germany, but came 
to the United States in young manhood, and located in Wisconsin. 

John E. Pufahl attended the common and high schools of his native 
state, and then learned telegraphy, and was engaged with various rail- 
roads until 1920, when he was made one of the employes of the Borden 
plant at West McHenry. So efficient did he prove that in 1911 he was 



804 HISTORY OF McHENEY COUNTY 

promoted to be manager, and has held that important position ever 
since. The capacity of the plant is 40,000 pounds per day. 

On September 21, 1904, Mr. Pufahl was united in marriage with 
Miss Bertha Leech, a daughter of Edward Leech. Mr. and Mrs. Pufahl 
have two children, namely: Pauline K., who was born September 16, 
1906; and Adell H., who was born July 16, 1908. Mr. Pufahl is a 
Republican, but has not had the time to enter into public life, although 
he gives the principles and candidates of his party an intelligent and 
hearty support. Both he and Mrs. Pufahl are consistent members of 
the Catholic church. 



CHARLES QUACKENBUSH. 

Charles Quackenbush, one of the enterprising farmers of Chemung 
Township, lives on the old Philip Burton farm, seven miles northwest 
of Harvard, where he is achieving a deserved success as an agriculturalist. 
Philip Burton was the father of Billings Burton, and he died in 1879 or 
1S80 at the age of seventy-five years. His wife, whose maiden name was 
Nancy Quackenbush, survived him until 1893, when she passed away at 
the age of ninety-three years, having lived on the old farm from 1841 
until her death. After his father's death, Billings Burton, renting his 
own farm, moved on that of his mother to take care of her, and he 
erected a portion of the present buildings. Later he sold his own farm 
to a son, George, who is now a stock dealer of Sharon. Another son. 
Charles, also lives at Sharon. They are the only survivors of their 
father's family. Billings Burton later divided the 300-acre farm and 
built a new set of buildings, but finally sold the property and retired 
to Sharon. The old farm of Philip Burton remained in the family, 
Mrs. Charles Quackenbush inheriting it about 1901. To this farm 
Mr. Quackenbush has added forty acres, erected a house, and made 
other improvements, and is carrying on dairying. 

Mrs. Quackenbush was.Nora Burton prior to her marriage, and the 
youngest of the twelve children of Billings Burton, being born November 
29, 1874, on her father's farm. On June 15, 1892, she was married to 
Charles Quackenbush, who was born in the village of Sharon, four miles 
away from her birthplace, April 20, 1870, a son of Luke and Sarah 
Quackenbush, natives of New York, who came to McHenry County 
about 1845, and located near Sharon. There he died at the age of 
seventy-two years, and she at the age of seventy-five years. Until his 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 805 

marriage, Charles Quackenbush lived among the neighboring fanners, 
working by the month, but afterwards was engaged in teaming for a 
year, and then for two years was manager of a summer resort at Lake 
Geneva. In 1898, Mr. and Mrs. Quackenbush returned to the Burton 
home. Mr. and Mrs. Quackenbush have no children, but adopted 
Frank Rice, a boy of three years, whom they reared. He married 
Eunice Woodward, and is operating a portion of the farm owned by 
Mr. Quackenbush. Mr. and Mrs. Rice have three children, namely: 
Lyle, Floyd and Helen Irene. Mr. Quackenbush served as road com- 
missioner for one year. He is an excellent farmer and keeps his property 
up to a high standard. Mrs. Quackenbush is one of the best-known 
ladies in the county, coming as she does of such old pioneer families, 
and enjoys a pleasant social life among her neighbors. 



.JAMES RAINEY. 



James Rainey, local manager at Ringwood for the Alexander Lumber 
Company, extensive dealers in lumber and all kinds of building material, 
is one of the representative business men of McHenry County. He was 
born in Michigan, November 25, 1872, one of the seven children of James 
and Mary (Cochrain) Rainey. James Rainey, the father, was born in 
Ireland, where he learned the trade of a carpenter. In young manhood 
he came to Canada, and thence to the United States, locating for a time 
in Michigan, but later returned to Canada, where he now resides. 

James Rainey, the younger, attended the schools of Michigan, but 
caily was forced to become self-supporting, and was employed at various 
kinds of work until 1916, when he became connected with his present 
firm, later becoming the manager of its Ringwood plant, which was 
organized in 1914. This plant does a business of $40,000 annually. 

In 1906 Mr. Rainey was married to Miss Callie Thomas, a daughter 
of George Thomas, one of the leading men of McHenry County. Mr. 
and Mrs. Rainey are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. 
Rainey belongs to Ringwood Lodge No. 158, A. F. & A. M., and also to 
the Modern Woodmen of America. Politically he is a staunch Repub- 
lican. Mr. Rainey's rise in the world has come through his own effort,.-;. 
His success is therefore all the more commendable, and his methods of 
doing business are such as to win him the approval and respect of his 
associates. 



806 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

GRANT S. RANDALL. 

Grant S. Randall, one of the prosperous business men of Hebron, and 
enterprising farmers of Hebron Township, is recognized as one of the 
leading men of McHenry County. He was born in Jo Daviess County, 
111., September 23, 1868, one of the four children of Aaron and Caroline 
(Fowler) Randall. Born in England, Aaron Randall was brought to 
the United States when he was nine \ r ears old, and he lived in Jo Daviess 
County, 111., for some years, being there engaged in farming. Later he 
entered the employ of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad, and 
remained with it the rest of his life, dying in 1894. 

The educational training of Grant S. Randall was received in the 
grammar and high schools of Illinois, and his first practical experience 
was gained in butter and cheese manufacturing, which business he con- 
ducted for ten years. In 1898 he bought ninety acres of valuable land 
in Hebron Township, and has conducted it ever since, and been quite 
active in dairying as well. In 1918, he and Messrs. Slavin and Aylward 
formed the firm of Slavin, Randall & Aylward, grain merchants of 
Hebron, and it has built up an extensive trade. 

In 1890 Mr. Randall was united in marriage with Miss Florence 
Brass, a daughter of Orson N. Brass, and they have two children, 
namely: Hettie M. and Florence R. Mr. Randall is a Republican. 
Both as a farmer and business man Mr. Randall has displayed unusual 
abilities, and his prosperity is all the more deserved in that he has gained 
it through his own efforts, and through methods which are strictly 
honorable. 



THOMAS H. RATFIELD. 

Thomas H. Rat field, who is now living retired one mile south of 
Marengo, was formerly one of the leading farmers of this region, and is 
a man widely known and universally respected. He was born in Virgil 
Township, Kane County, 111., February 27, 1852, a son of William and 
Betsy (Parker) Ratfield, of Brainard, County Essex, England. William 
Ratfield lost his father when a child, and at the age of ten years he 
shipped on a vessel as a cabin boy, later becoming a sailor, and was on 
the water for twelve years, and among other countries visiting the 
United States, and liking conditions here so well, he decided to remain. 

In 1834 he came to Illinois, having been married in New York. He 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 807 

lived in Virgil Township for a few years, then moved to Riley Township, 
McHenry County, where he died at the age of sixty-five years. Some 
years prior to that event, he was seriously injured by lightning, which 
struck his house. His wife assumed the management of the farm after 
his accident, and brought up the ten children, who were as follows: 
William Nelson, who served during the Civil War in Company B, 
Seventeenth Illinois Cavalry, died in Polk County, Minn.; Mary 
Margaret, who married Frank Allen, died at the age of sixty-five; 
Harriet Ann, who married John Solomon, lives at Sycamore, 111.; 
Thomas H., whose name heads this review; Elizabeth, who married 
George Trout, died at Chicago in 1918; Rosetta, who is married, lives at 
Sycamore, 111.; Cyrillus, who is a contracting carpenter, lives at Minn- 
eapolis, Minn.; George, is a railroad engineer, who has been working in 
the western states, but is now a resident of Canada; Edward, who is a 
farmer of Sumas, Wash.; Eldora, who married Fred King, lives in 
Montana. 

Thomas H. Ratfield acted as conservator of the estate, until his 
father's death and cleared off the indebtedness, and following his father's 
demise he was made administrator. By buying the interests of the 
other heirs, he secured the old farm and was on it until he turned it over 
to his son, Alva J., and when this son went to Texas, another son, 
William L., took charge. Another farm owned by Mr. Ratfield s 
operated by his son Charles T. For the past five years Mr. Ratfield has 
been living on his farm of twenty acres, on which he erected his present 
residence. 

On March 1, 1877, Mr. Ratfield was married to Emeline Eliza Collins, 
of Burlington, Kane County, 111., a daughter of Leander and Jerusha 
Collins, of New York, who were married in Kane County. Later they 
went to Elgin, 111., and their old home, a picture of which is in Mrs. 
Ratfield's possession, was later used as a school, a church and post office. 
The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Ratfield have been as follows: 
Charles T., who is on the eighty-acre farm in Riley Township; Alva J., 
who is in Relotis, Tex., was a teacher at one time in De Kalb County, 
111.; William L., who is on the old homestead; Jesse James, who was a 
carpenter, died at the age of thirty-two years; Louis Seymour, served in 
the navy during the Great War, being one of the first to enlist from this 
region, was discharged and is now living at Gloucester, Mass.; and 
Merritt Irvin, who is at home. He possesses a mechanical talent and 
has taken a commercial course at the Elgin Business College. Mr. 
Ratfield has served as road commissioner for four terms, and as a 



808 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

justice of the peace. While a Republican in sentiment, for the past 
twenty-one years, he has voted the Prohibition ticket, one of three to 
support it in his township. His first vote was for a Greenback candidate. 
Mrs. Ratfield is a Republican, and she is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. Mr. Ratfield, while not a member of this church, 
attends its services and gives it a generous support. He belongs to the 
Court of Honor, and he is also a member of the Community Club. 



JOHN W. RAYCRAFT. 



John W. Raycraft, one of the prosperous farmers of Greenwood 
Township, and one who stands very well in public esteem, owns 548 
acres of land, 400 acres of which comprise his homestead. He was born 
in Greenwood Township, October 27, 1847, a son of Wi liam and Mary 
(Flemming) Raycraft, natives of County Cork and the nlorth of Ireland, 
respectively. In young manhood William Raycraft came to the United 
States, and after some time spent in different portions of Illinois, located 
in McHenry County, where he entered 240 acres of land from the 
government. He died in California at the age of forty-four years, his 
wife surviving him until she was seventy-five years old. They had three 
children, but John W. Raycraft is the only survivor. 

John W. Raycraft was reared in Greenwood Township and attended 
its schools, and learned to be a farmer. He was married to Johanna 
Ryan, who was born at Woodstock, a daughter of John and Mary Ryan. 
Mr. and Mrs. Raycraft became the parents of nine children, three of 
whom died in infancy. Those surviving are as follows: Lizzie, who is 
Mrs. S. J. Ogle; William F. ; John; Joseph; Maude; and Robert. In 
addition to his 400 acre homestead, Mr. Raycraft owns 148 acres in 
Hartland Township and carries on general farming upon an extensive 
scale. A Democrat, he has served as road commissioner for one year. 
He is a member of the Catholic church. A thoroughly experienced 
farmer, he is regarded as a model agriculturalist, and his advice is often 
sought by those who aim to conduct their farms in the best and latest 
manner. 



MISS HATTIE READ. 



Miss Hattie Read, one of the notable educators of McHenry County, 
under whose wise care and capable instruction many of the children of 



HISTORY OF McHENRT? COUNTY SO!) 

an older generation learned the fundamentals of English, and hold her 
memory close to their hearts. She devoted her life to her chosen 
vocation, and remained in the educational field until failing eyesight 
forced her to retire after half a century of strenuous effort. Her mind 
remained clear to the end of her life, and she lived happily at her home 
in Hebron. 

Miss Read taught in a number of the schools of McHenry County, 
and then was called to Wisconsin, where she taught in Lynn Township 
and at Lake Geneva, and also at Madison. Always ahead of her times, 
she used many of the methods in her work which then were an innovation, 
but now are accepted as essentials. Her old pupils took pleasure in 
visiting her and giving her little attentions that in a measure paid back 
her devotion to them in days gone by. 



DAVID REDPATH. 



David Redpath, one of the honored residents of Woodstock, and a 
man widely and favorably known, was born at Elizabeth, Jo Daviess 
County, 111., February 15, 1845, a son of Alexander and Ann (Pringle) 
Redpath, both born near Pinkey, Scotland. Coming to the United 
States in young manhood, Alexander Redpath met a brother of Ann 
Pringle, and with him, joined Mr. and Mrs. Pringle who had already 
located in Jo Daviess County, 111., attracted thereto by the opening of the 
lead mines. Another member of the Pringle family formed a partnership 
with his future brother-in-law, Alexander Redpath, and the two re- 
mained together for eight years operating a lead mine. 

In the meanwhile Alexander Redpath and Ann Pringle were married, 
and subsequently located on a farm near Marengo, near that of his 
brother-in-law, Patterson Pringle, which was about two miles north of 
the city. Here Alexander Redpath died in 1872, aged sixty-six years. 
His widow survived him for some years, dying when eighty-four years 
old, at Marengo. Alexander Redpath was not desirous of public honors, 
and devoted himself untiringly to his own affairs. 

David Redpath attended the schools of Marengo, and the Jennings 
Seminary at Aurora. He was married (first) to Janet Purves, who died 
after bearing him three children, namely: Lizzie, who is Mrs. Wallace 
D. Echternach of De Kalb County, 111.; Grace, who owns and operates 
a portion of the old Purves homestead in Seneca Township; and William 
P., who was an infant at his mother's death, is a leading farmer of 



810 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

Seneca Township, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work. In 
1879 David Redpath was married (second) to Mary A. Lindsay, who 
died after twenty-five years of married life, leaving three children, 
namely: Charles L., who is on the old Alexander Redpath homestead 
in Marengo Township; Margaret, who is with her father; and Frances 
M., who is Mrs. D. B. Boyle, Jr., lives at Marengo. The present wife 
of David Redpath was Mrs. Marian Cassel, widow of James Cassel, 
and a daughter of William and Janet (Lindsay) Scott, and she is a niece 
of the second wife of Mr. Redpath. There are no children of this 
marriage. 

Until recent years David Redpath was engaged in farming in Mc- 
Henry County, but realizing that he had reached the time of life when 
it was expedient for him to the comforts of life, he retired to Woodstock, 
although he spends his winters at Zephyr Hill, near Tampa, Fla. During 
the Civil War Mr. Redpath served his country as a soldier, being in 
the One Hundred and Forty-first Illinois Infantry, and a portion of the 
time was in Kentucky guarding the forts from attacks by guerrilla bands. 
The Redpath family is one of the old ones of McHenry County and its 
history is interwoven with that of the section in which its representatives 
have lived for so many years. 



GEORGE W. REDPATH. 

George W. Redpath, who is now living retired at Marengo, was 
formerly one of the successful agriculturalists of his township, and is 
:i man widely known and universally respected. He was born May 12, 
1859, on the old Redpath homestead two and one-half miles northeast 
of Marengo, and is the youngest of his father's family. He was reared 
on this farm and sent to the local schools until he was eighteen years old, 
at which time he had the misfortune to lose his father. Then, in com- 
pany with his brother, Robert, who was seven years his senior, he bought 
an eighty-acre tract directly north of Marengo, and this partnership 
continued for nine years, the two carrying on dairying and farming. 
About 1880, they bought the Hutchinson farm of 232 acres, and re- 
moved from the old home in which they had been living, to it. This 
second farm was near their first one. In 1885, George W. Redpath 
sold his interests to his brother, who six years later, losing his health, 
retired to Marengo, and died there in the fall of 1918. His widow and 
one son, Thomas, still live at Marengo. 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 811 

George M. Redpath bought 200 acres of land in Riley Township, 
six miles south of Marengo, known as the Seniles farm, and lived there 
until he lost his wife through an accident, and he then rented the farm 
and located at Marengo, where for ten years he was engaged in buying 
stock, and also for three years handled lumber and coal in partnership 
with E. E. Seward. Selling his interests, Mr. Redpath then returned 
to the farm, and spent five years on it, but when his son married, he 
was able to relieve his father of the duties of management, and Mr. 
Redpath once more located at Marengo. For thirty years he has been 
interested in fire and life insurance in partnership with J. C. Tanner, 
they purchasing the Mead Insurance Agency. Mr. Redpath still owns 
140 acres in Riley Township, one and one-half miles southwest of his 
homestead, as well as the latter property, and is in very comfortable 
circumstances. While engaged in farming he paid special attention 
to dairying during his earlier years, but later raised more cattle and 
hogs, shipping them in large quantities to the Chicago markets. While 
voting the Republican ticket, he is not a public man. 

When he was twenty-nine years old, Mr. Redpath was married to 
Nellie Albee of Seneca Township. Her death was a tragedy, which 
plunged the whole community in mourning, and she left a six-months 
old son, Harold Everett, who is now conducting the homestead. He 
was married to Eda Keeney, and they have one son, George Germaine. 
Harold E. Redpath now owns 120 acres of his own. 

George M. Redpath was married (second) to Ruth McKinney of 
Marengo, a daughter of E. F. McKinney, an old merchant of that city. 
Mr. and Mrs. Redpath have one daughter, Frances A., who is attending 
the Marengo High School. Mr. Redpath is an elder in the Presbyterian 
church, and has held that office for five years. His recreations are 
automobiling and fishing. 



WILLIAM REDPATH. 



William Redpath, one of the most progressive young farmers of 
Seneca Township, was born November 17, 1875, a son of David and 
Janet (Purvis) Redpath, mention of whom is made elsewhere in this 
work. William Redpath was with his father's people until he was 
eight years old, and then joined his father, with whom he remained until 
seventeen years of age, at which time he began working for neighboring 
farmers, for three years being with August Swager of Marengo, who 



812 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

paid him -117 per month. Then, for a year, he was in partnership with 
his brother-in-law, when once more he worked by the month. Subse- 
quently he became his father's tenant and as such conducted the home- 
stead. Then, on November 22, 1899, he was married to Emma A. 
Wilcox, a daughter of John Q. and Arilla Wilcox, whose farm is located 
one-half mile west of Mr. Redpath's farm. She was born April 4, 
1875, so is about the same age as her husband. Following his marriage, 
Mr. Redpath rented a farm owned by his uncle, and then in 1902, bought 
his present farm of 160 acres, paying $64 per acre for it. This land 
has a branch of the Kiswaukee running through it, and it is admirably 
adapted for dairying. In 1916 Mr. Redpath rebuilt his house, and 
invested $4,000 in new buildings, now having silos, a barn with base- 
ment 40x60, with twenty-four feet posts, and an addition 32x36 feet. 
He has a fine supply of water, which is piped to all the buildings. There 
are stabling accommodations for 100 head of cattle. His herd runs 
from ten to fort}' head and his cattle are high grade, as he breeds from 
a thoroughbred bull. Each spring he sells cattle and running horses, 
brood sows, and other stock, although he caters to the needs of dairy- 
men. He also feeds hogs. For the past three years his residence has 
been at Marengo, but he supervises all the farming operations. 

Mr. and Mrs. Redpath are the parents of five children, Ira, Irma, 
lone, Irlene and Ina, all of whom are at home. He does not take any 
active part in politics. Without question Mr. Redpath is one of the 
most progressive men of this section and one who is thoroughly alive 
to public interests. 



HENRY REHORST. 



Henry Rehorst, now deceased, was an able farmer, excellent business 
man and respected citizen, whose operations were mainly centered in 
Richmond Township. He was born at Munster, Westphalia, Germany, 
December 24, 1845, and died at Richmond January 24, 1895. In 1862 
he came to the United States and went alone to Bassetts Station, Kenosha 
County, Wis., spending the subsequent winter in farm work, and in the 
spring he came to McHenry County. In 1865 he was married to Mrs. 
Christina Elfers, and lived on her 160-acre farm located on the state line 
until her death in 1870. They had three daughters, namely: Lydia 



HISTORY OP McHENRY COUNTY 813 

Rehorst, who is of Richmond; Mary, who is Mrs. Peter Olsen of Salem, 
Wis.: ami Anna K., who is Mrs. Edwin Haldeman of Spring Grove, 111. 
By her fonnei' marriage, Mrs. Rehorst had four children, namely: Lena, 
who married John Kolthoff of New Hampton, Iowa, where she died; 
William Elfers, who lives at Richmond; Christina, who married Frank 
Rosencrans, died at New Hampton, Iowa; and George Elfers, who lives 
in Richmond Township. 

After his wife's death, Mr. Rehorst rented the Elfers farm for five 
or six years. On February 11, 1873, he was married (second) to Mary 
E. Kasken of Wheatland, Wis., a daughter of Herman and Elizabeth 
(Burner) Kasken, both natives of Westphalia, Germany, and early 
settlers in Wisconsin. In 1879 Mr. Rehorst bought the Robert Turner 
farm of 200 acres, two and one-half miles east of Richmond, and two 
miles north of Solon Mills, to which he later added until he had 260 
acres. This farm is still owned by his widow. After buying the property 
he improved the buildings, doing something each year. He had other 
interests, forming a partnership with James Westlake to operate the 
Washington Cheese Factory, one mile away from his farm, but later 
sold his share in it. While he did handle sheep, he made milk his leading- 
feature. Two years prior to his death he retired to Richmond. Prior 
to leaving his native land he connected himself with the Presbyterian 
church, and ever continued a faithful member of it; and helped to build 
the church of that denomination, in his neighborhood. For years he 
served on the school board. 

By his second marriage Mr. Rehorst had the following children: 
Sylvia, who married Henry Vbgel, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere 
in this work; Nellie L., who was a teacher in the home school, is living 
with her mother; and Edith, who is Mrs. Clyde Wilson of Richmond. 
Mrs. Rehorst is a Presbyterian, but her daughters belong to the Con- 
gregational church. Mr. Rehorst was both a Chapter Mason and 
Woodman, and was charter member of the local camp of the latter, 
and his was the first death in that organization. He was buried with 
Masonic honors in the cemetery at Richmond. Mrs. Rehorst and her 
daughters are charter members of the Richmond Chapter, O. E. S., and 
Miss Nellie is secretary of the local chapter. After the death of Mr. 
Rehorst, Mrs. Rehorst erected her present decidedly modern residence 
on the site of the old one, in which Mr. Rehorst 's last days were spent, 
and it is a credit to her ability and good taste as well as an ornament to 
the village of Richmond. 



814 HISTORY OF McHEXRY COUNTY 

CHARLES J. REIHANSPERGER. 

Charles J. Reihansperger is one of the prosperous business men of 
West McHenry, whose efforts have been successfully directed toward 
conducting a hardware store, as the junior member of the firm of Donavin 
& Reihansperger. Charles J. Reihansperger was born at Chicago, 
April 21, 1891, one of the two children of John and Sarah (McConley) 
Reihansperger, native of Illinois, the former of whom has for a number 
of years been a railroad engineer. 

After attending the common and high schools of Chicago, Charles 
J. Reihansperger learned the trade of a tinner, completing his apprentice- 
ship in 1913. Two years later he formed his present partnership, and 
the firm carry a full and complete line of light and heavy hardware and 
plumbing supplies, and have a fine trade. Their stock averages about 
$8,000, and is thoroughly up-to-date, while their work is excellent in 
every respect . 

In 1917 Mr. Reihansperger was married to Miss Julia Stuffell, a 
daughter of Simon Stuffell, one of the leading bankers of West McHenry, 
a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work. Mr. and Mrs. Reihan- 
sperger are members of the Catholic church. Fraternally he belongs to 
the Knights of Columbus. Politically he is a Republican. 



ERNEST C. REIMER. 



Ernest C. Reimer, senior member of the firm of Reimer & Lace, 
proprietors of the Algonquin garage and general repairing and machine 
shop, is one of the alert young business men of Algonquin, and comes of an 
old and respected family of McHenry County. He was born at Huntley, 
this county, December 1, 1888, a son of Frederick and Reka (Albright) 
Reimer, natives of Germany, who came to the United States in 1882, 
first stopping at Chicago, from where they came to Huntley, 111., where 
the father was engaged in farming. They now reside in Algonquin. 
Thej r became the parents of six children. 

Ernest C. Reimer attended the common and high schools of his native 
place, and after learning to farm, took up the machinist's trade, and 
having mastered it, in December, 1914, formed his present connection 
with Claude C. Lace, the two doing a fine business in all branches of their 
business. Thev carry a stock valued at $7,000. 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 815 

In 1917 Mr. Reimer was married to Miss Irene Schuette. They have 
one son, Edward C. Reimer. Mr. and Mrs. Reimer belong to tin- 
Lutheran church. In politics he is a Republican. Enterprising and 
skilled, Mr. Reimer has forged ahead, and rightly deserves the pros- 
perity which has attended his efforts. 



CHARLES F. RENICH. 

Charles F. Renich, president, treasurer and controlling stockholder 
in the corporation owning the Woodstock Sentinel, of which he is also 
editor, is one of the representative men of McHenry County. He was 
born at Woodstock, December 19, 1871, a son of Frederick and Katherine 
(Stein) Renich, the former of whom was born in the Alpine republic of 
Switzerland. His parents were natives of Bern, Switzerland, and they 
had three sons, namely: Emil, Frederick and Edward. After the death 
of his wife, the paternal grandfather came to the United States to join his 
sons who had already readied this haven for so many foreign-born, but 
after he reached Pittsburgh, Pa., he disappeared and nothing was ever 
heard of him again. 

His eldest son, Emil, who had received a university education, served 
in the Civil War, in a New York regiment, was wounded and confined in 
Libby prison. After the close of the war he went to Chicago, where he 
was married and there reared a family. For eighteen years prior to his 
death he was a Chicago letter carrier. His death occurred in 1896. 

Frederick Renich, father of Editor Renich, was born in Bern, 
Switzerland, March 19, 1842. During his boyhood he attended the 
Industrial School at Bern, and there learned the trade of a confectioner, 
which he followed in different cities of his native land. In 1864 he left 
Switzerland for the United States, and came direct to Chicago after 
landing in this country. From that city he enlisted in the Ninth 
Illinois Cavalry, and was mustered out from that service several months 
later, in 1865, at the close of the war. Returning to Chicago he em- 
barked in the manufacture of cigars. On August 26, 1866, he was 
married to Elizabeth Stein of Chicago, and the following year he moved 
to Woodstock, where he continued to manufacture cigars. His wife 
died in the fall of the same year of his settlement at Woodstock, and he 
later married Katherine Stein. 

Katherine Stein was born in Chicago March 14, 1846, a daughter of 



816 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

Charles Stein, who came to Chicago from Hesse Darmstadt, Germany, 
in 1834, and has the distinction of being the first German born 
pioneer resident of Chicago, which at that time was but a village of a 
few hundred people. Charles Stein was a successful business man, he 
and his family conducting one of the first hotels in Chicago, where 
thousands of pioneer settlers, coming into the Western country from 
France and Germany, many of them locating in McHenry County, 
found their first stopping place after the long and wearisome trip in 
sailing vessels over the ocean, and from New York through the Erie 
Canal and the Great Lakes to Chicago. The name of Stein was a house- 
hold word among many of the pioneer settlers of Queen Anne prairie 
and other parts of McHenry County and in the latter days of Mr. 
Stein's life he spent many happy days visiting these pioneers of McHenry 
County, who had received their first welcome in this new country 
at his hostelry in Chicago. 

Frederick Renich's death occurred February 22, 1890, when he was 
forty-eight years of age, and he was survived by his widow and seven 
children, namely: Charles F., whose name heads this review; Charlotte, 
who is Mrs. P. Benjamin Anderson; Frederick L.; Mary E. ; Edward A.; 
Amanda E., who is Mrs. D. Arthur Daly; and Katharine. 

Charles F. Renich attended the public schools of Woodstock, and 
when he was sixteen years old he was taken into the newspaper office 
his father had acquired, and there learned the newspaper business, 
beginning from the bottom. His father dying when he was only a little 
over eighteen years of age, he succeeded to the management of the paper, 
then issued under the name of Das Volksblatt, and later his brother 
Frederick came into the business. In May, 1895, Mr. Renich formed a 
partnership with Benedict Stupfel of Woodstock, under the name of 
Stupfel & Renich, for the purpose of conducting a grocery business, 
but in a few years Mr. Stupfel retired, and Mr. Renich continued alone 
for a year, and then took as his partner Stark L. Hart. 

In December, 1899, Mr. Renich was appointed postmaster of Wood- 
stock by President William McKinley, and he held it from 1900 until 
1911, when he retired in order to devote himself to his newspaper work. 
He was twice reappointed by President Roosevelt. In January, 1906, 
he acquired an interest in and became manager and editor of the Wood- 
stock Sentinel, McHenry County's oldest newspaper. Later he pur- 
chased the stock of others until he is now almost the sole owner of the 
company, serving as president and treasurer of the corporation. During 
the period of the World War he served as chairman in three of the Liberty 



1I1STOKY OF McIIKXRY COl'NTY 817 

Loan sales drives in Woodstock, I he people of which community pur- 
chased aliout 81, 000,000 worth of bonds under his leadership. He also 
was an active participant in every other patriotic movement during the 
war, both through his newspaper and personally. 

On November 14, 1894, Mr. Renich was married to Miss Lucy II. 
Hennings at Barrington, 111. Mrs. Henich is a daughter of Charles C. 
and Caroline (Mundhenk) Hennings, and she was born at Palatine, 111., 
September 30, 1S75. For nearly twenty years Mrs. Renich has held 
a responsible position at the Woodstock post office, entering her duties 
there first to assist her husband as postmaster at a time when the office 
was small and the pay of the clerks came out of the postmaster's salary. 
She has continued following her husband's retirement as postmaster and 
served through the administrations of Postmasters W. S. McConnell and 
( }. W. Frame, the latter being the present incumbent. Mrs. Renich has 
been active in social work, especially in the Women's Relief Corps and 
Eastern Star. In the former organization, besides being president 
several terms, she served three and one-half years as treasurer for the 
department of Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. Renich have a daughter, Florence, 
who was born March 14, 1896. She was a graduate of Wisconsin Univer- 
sity at Madison, and for the past four years has been employed as a 
chemist at the Victor Chemical works at Chicago Heights, 111. Mr. 
Renich belongs to St. Mark's Lodge No. 63, A. F. & A. M., and several 
other fraternal orders. In politics he is a zealous Republican, and has 
always been interested in public matters. 



PHINEAS A. RENIE. 



Phineas A. Renie, M. D., one of the leading physicians and surgeons 
of McHenry County, owns and conducts the only drug store at Union, 
and is recognized as one of the representative men of this region. He 
was born in Riley Township, McHenry County, February 10, 1867, 
one of the seven children of John A. and Malinda (Miller) Renie. John 
A. Renie was a farmer, but later became a blacksmith, but continued 
his farming, carrying both lines of business after he and his family 
located in Riley Township, McHenry County, in 1840. His wife sur- 
vived her husband until May 30, 1919, when she passed away at Marengo, 
then being over eighty years of age. 

After attending the common and high schools of his locality, Doctor 



818 HISTORY OF McHENRT COUNTY 

Rome took a medical course at Hahnemann College, from which he was 
graduated in 1891. Immediately thereafter he located at Marengo, 
and remained there in active practice until 1898, when he came to Union, 
where he has since remained. His drug store contains a stock valued 
at $2,000, and he owns his residence, store building and four lots at 
Union. Doctor and Mrs. Renie also own a fine farm of sixty acres of 
land in Seneca Township. 

On June 4, 1891, Doctor Renie was united in marriage with Miss 
Mamie Wallace, a daughter of Amos Wallace, and a member of one of 
the pioneer families of McHenry County, who originated in New York 
state. Doctor and Mrs. Renie have two children, namely: Lota M., 
who is attending the Elgin Academy; and Francis W., who is attending 
the Union School. 

Doctor Renie is a member of Orion Lodge No. 358, A. F. & A. M., 
of which he is past master, and Oriental Consistory of Chicago. He 
also belongs to the Mystic Workers of Union; the Odd Fellows of which 
he is past grand; Woodmen of the World; and the Volunteer Surgeons 
of America, and the county, state and national medical societies. 

A Republican, Doctor Renie has been locally active, and has served 
as a member and president of the local school board, president of the 
village board for ten years, and supervisor of Coral Township for one 
term. A man of unusual ability and scholarly attainments, he has 
known how to bring about satisfactory results along all lines, and during 
the late war was very active in his support of the administration and his 
advocacy of patriotic measures. 



ERASTUS EMERY RICHARDS. 

Erastus Emery Richards, one of the most representative men of 
McHenry County, and an honored resident of Woodstock, has for many 
years conducted an abstract of title business under the name of Richards, 
Jewett and Wright Abstract Company, of which he is now president. 
Mr. Richards was born in Sharon, Norfolk County, Mass., February 12, 
1838, a son of Erastus and Rowena Caroline (Johnson) Richards. The 
fathci' was a tanner and conducted a meat market for many years. He 
served as town clerk and assessor, and was long a police magistrate, 



HISTORY OK M< IIKXRY OOCNTY 819 

which office he was holding at the time of his death, which occurred when 
he was eighty years and seven months old. 

Erastus Emery Richards attended the common, parish, and high 
schools of his neighborhood, and read law for two years in the offices of 
M. C. Johnson and H. S. Hanchett. On June 10, 1852, he came to 
Woodstock, and since his arrival has taken an important part in its 
public life and development. When his country had need of him, he 
enlisted in Company A, Fifteenth Illinois Infantry, and served bravely 
and well during the Civil War, participating, among other engagements, 
in the battle of Shiloh. After his honorable discharge, he returned to 
Woodstock, and resumed his peaceful occupations. For one year he 
served as deputy circuit clerk; was deputy county clerk under E. M. 
Lamb, William H. Stewart, for four years, and M. D. Hoy for eight 
years. He was clerk of the circuit court and recorder of deeds for twelve 
successive years; he served as mayor of Woodstock for three full terms 
and to fill a vacancy; was alderman of Woodstock for one term; and was 
city and town clerk. For ten years he was president of the school 
board, and for seventeen years he was president of the board of directors 
of the public library. For over twenty-six years he was president of 
the State Rank of Woodstock, of which he is now a director, and was 
president of the Citizens' State Bank of Nunda. 

On July 19, 1864, Mr. Richards was married at Woodstock, 111., to 
Frances A. Wait, a daughter of Henry M. and Narina (King) Wait. 
Mrs. Richards died December 13, 1920. Mr. and Mrs. Richards had 
no children. Mr. Richards is a Mason and belongs to St. Mark's 
Lodge No. 63, A. F. & A. M., which he served as master for one year; 
Woodstock Chapter, No. 36, R. A. M.; Calvary Commandery No. 
25, K. T., of which he was eminent commander for six successive years, 
and he is treasurer of it at present. 

A man of his standing naturally has weight in his community, and 
Mr. Richards has always exerted himself to bring about improvements, 
and to raise the standards in every way possible. While mayor, he set 
in motion a number of movements which ultimately resulted in addi- 
tional elaboration of the plans of those who had the best interests of the 
county seat at heart. His wide experience as a public official, and his 
know-ledge of the law, especially as related to property rights, have 
made him an invaluable man in his firm, and in his banking connections. 
Mr. Richards has taken a considerable interest in music for years, being 
a talented musician himself; and he has himself written several operas 
and produced one. 



820 BISTORT OF McHENRY COUNTY 

LYNN W. RICHARDS. 

Lynn W. Richards, county treasurer of McHenry County, and one 
of the best-known men of this section, having been associated with finan- 
cial matters for many years, both in a private and public capacity. He 
was born at Rowley, Iowa, September 9, 1876, one of the nine children 
of George B. and Ida (Chase) Richards. George B. Richards was one 
of the prominent men of McHenry County and in addition to owning 
and operating a fine farm in the county, he was circuit clerk and recorder 
for many years. His death occurred in 1907. 

Lynn W. Richards attended the public schools of McHenry County, 
to which his father moved when he was a child. Always prominent? 
as a Republican, he served as deputy circuit clerk and recorder for 
fifteen years, and in 1914, was elected on his party ticket for county 
treasurer. In the meanwhile he became connected with the State 
Bank of Crystal Lake as cashier, holding that position from 1911 to 
1916, when that institution was consolidated with the United States 
Bank, of which he is now cashier. 

In 1901, Mr. Richards was married to Miss Erma Phelps, a daughter 
of Benjamin Phelps of Harvard, 111. Mr. and Mrs. Richards have one 
daughter, Virginia. He is a Mason and Odd Fellow. A man of unusual 
force of character, he naturally dominates in his community, and it 
profits from his association with it. 



GEORGE JAMES RICHARDSON. 

George James Richardson, who is living on the family homestead 
five miles east of Richmond, and one and one-half miles north of Spring 
Grove in Burton Township, is one of the representative farmers of 
McHenry Count}'. He was born in his present house August 8, 1890, 
a son of J. B. Richardson, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this 
work. 

Growing up on the farm, George James Richardson attended the 
Richmond High School, from which he was graduated in 1908, following 
which he took a short agricultural course in the agricultural department 
of the State University at Madison, Wisconsin. He was with his father 
until October 21, 1915, when he was married to Stella Price, born near 
Bristol, Wis., who had been a teacher for four years, and is well educated, 




& 




fc 

^ 



j^p 




HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 821 

having taken English and commercial courses at Kenosha, Wis. He 
and his wife have two children, namely: Francis H. and Delia Edith. 
Since 1915, Mr. Richardson lias been operating 207 acres, owned by his 
father, as a general fanner and dairyman, and he breeds pure-bred 
cattle. He is independent in his political views, and for the past four 
years has been township treasurer. Mr. Richardson is a member of 
Richmond Lodge, A. F. & A. M. 



JESSE B. RICHARDSON. 

Jesse B. Richardson, one of the retired farmers of Richmond, was 
formerly extensively engaged in farming in Burton Township, where 
he still owns 207 acres of land. He was born in Burton Township, 
September 18, 1862, one of the thirteen children born to Robert and 
Eleanor (James) Richardson. Robert Richardson was born in England, 
but came to the United States in 1831, and after a stop at Milwaukee, 
Wis., came to McHenry County and entered land from the government 
in Burton Township, that is now owned by his son, Jesse B. He con- 
tinued to live in McHenry County until his death which occurred in 
1878. His widow survived him until 1894. 

Jesse B. Richardson was reared on the homestead, and sent to local 
schools. WTien he attained to mature years, he took charge of the old 
farm and became its owner, conducting it until his retirement in 1916, 
when he moved to Richmond. In 1904 he was elected supervisor of 
Burton Township and served as such until 1915, having been elected 
on the Democratic ticket. Mr. Richardson belongs to the Masons, 
having been advanced to the Knight-Templar degree, and is also a 
member of Richmond Lodge No. 267, O. E. S., and the Modern Wood- 
men of America. Mrs. Richardson also belongs to the Eastern Star. 

On February 4, 1886, Mr. Richardson was married to Miss Cora 
Belle Turner, a daughter of George E. Turner, well known in former 
days in McHenry County, where he died in 1872, his widow surviving 
him until 1903. They had five children. Mr. and Mrs. Richardson 
became the parents of the following children: Ella J., who is the wife 
of Louis Sweet, a prominent farmer of Richmond; Eaa Bell, who is the 
wife of Oliver R. Cubbon, employed by the Waukegan, 111., GasCompany; 
George J., who married Stella Price, is on the home place; Richard G., 
who was in the World War; and Amy E., who is at home. Mr. Richard- 



822 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

son and his family all attend the Methodist Episcopal church. He is 
one of the highly esteemed men of his locality, and deserves the comforts 
of life he is now enjoying, for he earned them through hard work and 
thrifty saving. 



JOSEPH HERBERT RICHARDSON. 

Joseph Herbert Richardson, one of the retired farmers of Richmond, 
belongs to one of the old and representative families of McHenry County. 
He was born in Burton Township, September 27, 1846, a son of Robert 
and Eleanor (James) Richardson, who had thirteen children. Robert 
Richardson was born in England, but in 1832 he came to the United 
States, locating first at Milwaukee, Wis., but in 1836, he came to Mc- 
Henry County and entered land from the government in Burton Town- 
ship, where he resided until his death in 1888. His widow survived 
him until 1899. 

Joseph Herbert Richardson was reared upon his father's homestead 
and attended the district schools. He began farming when he attained 
his majority, and eventually became the owner of 240 acres of choice 
land in Richmond Township, but sold a portion of it, now owning 120 
acres. He served as road commissioner for a number of years, was 
school trustee for ten years, and has always been a staunch Democrat. 

Oln March 6, 1889, Mr. Richardson was married to Miss Clarissa 
M otey, a daughter of Robert Motley, and a member of an old McHenry 
County family. Mr. and Mrs. Richardson have two children, namely: 
Ida J., who is the widow of Dr. William H. Strange, who was killed in 
an automobile accident in 1917; and Iva A., who is one of the popular 
school teachers of Evanston, 111. Mr. Richardson and his family belong 
to the Methodist Episcopal church. He belongs to Oriental Lodge No. 
143, A. F. & A. M., and she to the Eastern Star. Like the other mem- 
bers of his family, Mr. Richardson measures up to the highest 
standards of American citizenship, and his standing in his neighborhood 
is very gratifying. 



ROBERT H. RICHARDSON. 

Robert H. Richardson, one of the progressive agriculturalists of 
McHenry County, is on the old Richardson homestead in McHenry 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 823 

Township, three miles west of the city of McHcnry and seven miles east 
of Woodstock. He was born at Sparta, Wis., December 21, 1870, a son 
of Robert and Isobel (Lindsay) Richardson. Robert Richardson was 
born in Ohio in 1812, and died in July, 1888. In 1840 he left Ohio and 
came to visit relatives living in McHenry County, one of whom was 
Ashael Thompson, of Greenwood Township. Robert Richardson 
bought the farm of 100 acres, now known as the Richardson homestead. 
At that time there was a small log house on the property, but he improved 
the farm and lived on it until he was fifty years old. Prior to his mar- 
riage, his sister, Fidelia, kept house for him. Isobel Lindsay was born 
two miles south of Woodstock in Dorr Township, a sketch of her family 
being given elsewhere in this work. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Richardson went to Sparta, Wis., and spent a number of years, 
but eventually returned to their farm in McHenry County. Mr. 
Richardson kept on adding to his farm until he owned 320 acres, the 
greater part of which he secured at a low price. When he was seventy 
years old, his son, Robert H., took charge of the farm, but he con- 
tinued to live on it until his death in July, 1888. For a year there- 
after, his widow continued to live with Robert H. Richardson, and 
then erected a second house and barn on the farm and with a son, 
Paul, undertook to conduct a portion of the property, but her plans 
were disarranged by the death of Paul, who was thrown from a horse 
and killed when only eighteen years of age. Mrs. Richardson then 
moved to Woodstock, where she died in July, 1915, aged seventy-three 
years. She and her husband had the following children who reached 
maturity: Robert H., whose name heads this review; Mary B., who is 
Mrs. L. W. Thompson of Chicago; Sylvia, who was Mrs. Frank Thomp- 
son, died in 1916 near her old home; Jessie, who is Mrs. Guy Harrison 
of Anacortes, Wash.; Paul, who died at the age of eighteen years; and 
Nellie, who is Mrs. Arthur Dimon of Isabel, So. Dak. 

On January 1, 1892, Robert H. Richardson was married to Tillie A. 
Jacks, a daughter of Isaac and Mary Jacks, who lived on the farm 
adjoining the Richardson homestead. She died in 1909, leaving the 
following children: Seth, who is at home; Alice, who is also at home; 
Alfred, who was a member of the Sixth Marine Corps during the Greal 
War, had the honor of being one of the heroes of Chateau Thierry, and 
lost a foot in the defense of his country; and Sylvia, who is at home. 
On October 22, 1912, Mr. Richardson was married (second) to Jessie 
Ben well, reared in Lake County, 111. There are no children of this 
marriage. Mr. Richardson operated the entire homestead for some 



824 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

time, and now owns 139 acres of it. He has erected a large cow barn, 
34 x 80 feet, with a full basement and stabling facilities, and a silo, and 
keeps a herd of twenty cows. He is a Republican, but has never entered 
public life aside from serving on the school board, where he has held 
office for ten or a dozen years, and rendered valuable assistance in pro- 
tecting the interests of the children and providing them with proper 
educational advantages. 



CLIFFORD W. RICE. 



Clifford W. Rice, formerly superintendent of schools at Gary Station, 
now assistant principal at Harvard, has proven his ability as an educator 
and his worth as a man. He was born in DeKalb County, 111., June 
24, 1898, one of the two children of Frank P. and Hulda (Wickstrom) 
Rice, natives of New York state and Illinois, respectively. Frank P. 
Rice is extensively engaged in a contracting business, and both he and 
his wife are still living. 

Clifford W. Rice attended the common and high schools of DeKalb 
County, and completed his studies in the DeKalb Normal Schoo', from 
which he was graduated in 1918. Immediately thereafter he begin 
teaching, and has followed that calling with marked success ever since. 
In June, 1918, he became superintendent of the schools of Cary Station, 
and had six teachers under his supervision, the average attendance being 
about 180 pupils. Professor Rice is a scholarly man, and keeps him- 
self abreast, not only of the advances made in his own profession, but 
along all lines and possessing, as he does, the faculty of imparting knowl- 
edge to others, sends forth his pupils well fitted for any walk in life. 
-At Cary Station he inaugurated many changes in the school. He 
commands the respect and confidence of all with whom he is associated. 



MRS. MARTHA E. ROSE. 

Mis. Martha E. Rose, widow of John \V. Rose, and a daughter of 
the late Thomas Burnside, one of the pioneers of Seneca Township, is 
now an honored resident of Marengo, where she is the center of a de- 
lightful circle of friends. Her father, Thomas Burnside was born in 



HISTORY OF McIIEXRY COUNTY 

\cw York in 1816, and came west from Otsego County, tlial stale, to 
McHenry County, in 1839, locating one mile south of Franklinville, in 
Seneca Township After securing his land, Mr. Burnside returned to 
his old home, was married, and in the spring of 1840 came hack to 
McHenry County, bringing with him his wife and his brother, George, 
who lived for a time near Woodstock, but died at Poplar Grove, Boone 
County, 111. Once more Thomas Burnside went back to his New York 
home, but returned to his western farm, and died at Franklinville, 
which was named for Frank Stringer, who taught school and resided 
with Mr. Burnside. On the last day of school he sent up a silk balloon 
and named the locality Franklinville. The wife of Mr. Stringer bore 
the maiden name of Charlotte Frettenberg, and lived at Aurora, 111. 
for some time prior to his demise. Mrs. Burnside survived her husband, 
who passed away October 17, 1872, aged fift3 r -six years, and lived until 
1878, when she too died, being then sixty-four years old. Both were 
charter members of the Methodist society that held prayer meetings in 
their home at Franklinville, until in 1855 when a church was built. Mr. 
Burnside was a consistent Republican. He and his wife had two chil- 
dren, namely: Francis Harley, who served during the Civil War in 
Company E, Ninety-fifth Illinois Infantry, contracted disease and was 
brought home only to die before he was twenty-one years old; and 
Martha Elizabeth, who was born at Colliersville, Otsego County, N. Y., 
November 2, 1851. 

Mrs. Rose was reared on the farm in McHenry County, and on 
November 8, 1876, when twenty-five years old, she was married to 
John W. Rose who was from Pennsylvania. He also served as a soldier 
during the Civil War in the One Hundred and Thirty-sixth Pennsylvania 
Volunteer Infantry, and veteranized in the Second Pennsylvania Cavalry, 
in which he remained until peace was declared. Returning to his home 
in Tioga County, Pa., he cared for his father until 1874. After his 
marriage, took charge of the Burnside farm and conducted it until he 
retired to Franklinvillle, where he died on May 30, 1903, Decoration 
Day. He had long been a member of the G. A. R. Post at Woodstock, 
and his old comrades used to visit him during his last days. The Metho- 
dist Episcopal church at Franklinville held his membership. After his 
death Mrs. Rose went to Woodstock and spent three years there, but 
then moved to Marengo, which is now her home. She is very active in 
the Methodist church, the Woman's Relief Corps, and was its president. 
During the building of tin' soldiers' monument in the park, she was 
president of the Woodstock Corps, and it was through their efforts that 



826 HISTORY OF McIIENRY COUNTY 

the sum necessary to complete the fund for building, was raised. Mrs. 
Rose is also much interested in the Seneca Ladies' Literary Society, 
and has studied its early history with the result that she furnished the 
following very valuable and interesting article at one of the meetings: 

"It may not be known by a majority of the present membership of 
the S. L. L. S. that the organization was christened at the beginning 
'The Franklinville Ladies' Literary Society.' This was the name before 
the Civil War, while working in a humble way in conjunction with the 
National Mt. Vernon association, to preserve the tomb of George Wash- 
ington to the American nation. This was not the primary object of this 
society but was soon taken up by it. That we may understand what 
the work of the Mt. Vernon association was I will quote from a paper 
given into my care by one of the early members, our loved and honored 
Mrs. Parsons. 'In the year 1855 John Augustine Washington being 
without means to maintain the estate (the estate of George Washington) 
offered it for sale. A patriotic daughter of South Carolina, Ann Pamela 
Cunningham, resolved to save the Washington home to the country as a 
national possession, and devoted herself to the tremendous task of rais- 
ing the sum required, $200,000. In the year 1858 "the Mount Vernon 
Ladies' association of the Union" was organized with Miss Cunningham 
as regent, with vice regents representing different states, contributions 
were solicited and popular support given. Edward Everett and Wash- 
ington Irving gave the proceeds of certain writings and lectures, and 
thousands upon thousands of school children gave five cents each.' We 
are proud to know that our society in its earliest years helped in this 
patriotic work of such great magnitude. 

We can only know of the work of the society in its earliest years 
through tradition as the records were lost, but it has been established 
beyond a doubt that it was organized in April, 1855, at the home of 
Garret W. Dietz, J. P. of the township, also that Mrs. Daniel Wayne 
was the first president. 

Among the little incidents gleaned through a number of years' re- 
search of its early history we have the following related by a daughter 
of one of the earliest members: 

During the presidential campaign, when James Buchanan was the 
Democratic nominee for that high office, a Buchanan rally flag was 
made and exhibited at a meeting of the society. This caused such a 
commotion that the society very wisely resolved that in the future no 
part would be taken in politics by the ladies until after election when as 
good citizens all should participate. This incident was impressed upon 
the mind of the one relating it because her elder sisters made the flag. 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 827 

The non-partisan resolution has been well regarded in the past. 
What 'future development' may bring to our society now that women 
are numbered among those supposed to be competent to cast a ballot 
only time can reveal. 

In those early days every lady present at a meeting was counted a 
member and so recorded, in fact, about all of the secretary's business 
was a record running like this: Nov. 28th, society met at Mrs. Benson's 
members present, Mrs. King, Bigelow, Moiser, Anderson, Heaton, Par- 
sons, Hammond, Randolph, Jones, and then signed secretary. This is 
an exact copy of a society record of an early day. 

During the days of the Civil War the Literary society turned its 
attention where all loyal eyes were centered, 'to the front,' and worked 
devoting all their time to preparing necessary help to send to our soldier 
boys. At the close of the war they resumed their regular routine, assist- 
ing the entertaining hostess with her sewing while a member appointed 
as reader for the day, read from some book, occasionally they enjoyed 
an essay written by a member and sometimes by a husband. The 
world did not seem so rushed with work but what the men turned out 
to the meetings of the Ladies' Literary society. 

At the annual meeting, 1872, occurred the incident or culmination 
of incidents, now known as the only quarrel the ladies have indulged in, 
the contention being for restriction of membership, that the society 
might shine as the social elite. This would be ignoring the aim the 
constitution set forth, and when brought to the test was promptly voted 
down, resulting in the withdrawal of five prominent members, who 
immediately started a society of their own, but without the sanction of 
the society or share in the books they had demanded. They named 
their society the South Seneca Ladies' Literary society, and for a time 
kept their library books at Union. Just when the society divorced 
Franklinville and annexed Seneca to its cognomen I am unable to state. 
But we are the same old society founded by our pioneer fore-mothers of 
whom we are rightfully proud. Without the Seneca Ladies' Literary 
society the history of Seneca township can never be correctly written. 
It is hard to estimate the uplift socially and intellectually given to 
women and through them the benefit received by the families and the 
community in general. We have only to study its history to realize in 
a measure what it has been to women. The society was advanced 
slowly but surely in its management, always conservative, cautious, and 
jealous of any change from old time tradition. 

Some of our present members will recollect the criticism given when 



HISTORY OF Mc HENRY COUNTY 

the president of the year 1896 at its close, in response to a prevailing 
motion appointed a committee to revise the constitution and by-laws. 
Some of the older members felt almost as though the Heavens were 
about to fall; but those same dear old-time members later took pains 
to congratulate the committee and the society on a constitution and 
by-laws that can be read with confidence before any visitor without 
fear of criticism. Our manner of bookkeeping has greatly improved 
with years. All officer's duties are better defined and discharged. 
While we have not reached perfection, we are at least conscious of defi- 
ciencies and are reaching after better things. 

You ask about future developments of the Seneca Ladies' Literary 
society? Please do not expect me to foretell what they may be. It is 
generally conceded hard to tell what women will do. Just at present 
the younger organized women's clubs of the county are coquetting with 
the 'old girl' trying to persuade her that along their pathway lies the 
attainment of greater good to women, admitting that to walk the way 
would mean death to the old Seneca Literary, but maintaining that out 
of the chrysalis would emerge a more perfect body. Will the old dame 
listening yield'? Or will she, conscious of her own shortcomings, con- 
serve her strength for improvement along her own chosen lines, going 
forward judiciously as time changes, seeking to get all the good she can 
do all the good she can, and keep sweet! Wait and sec" 

All her life Mrs. Rose has revered her father, and it has been her 
aim to so order her life that she might live up to his ideals and follow 
the example set by his upright, godly life, and the many who have bene- 
fited by her generosity, Christian charity and kindness of heart, claim 
that she is a worthy daughter of an honored father and mother. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rose had no children of their own, but they took a 
little lad of six years, Eugene Pettett, into their hearts and home, and 
brought him up to useful manhood. He is now a resident of Hebron, 
McHenry County. 



GEORGE F. RUSHTON. 



George F. Rushton, vice-president of the American National Bank of 
Woodstock, is extensively interested in the real estate development of 
this section, and is a member of the firm of Rushton, Tappan and 
Rushton, heavy realty operators, with headquarters at Woodstock. 
Mr. Rushton was born in Wisconsin, September 27, 1853, a son of 



2 




CO 







HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 829 

Charles and Susan (Mabbot) Rushton, who had five children. Charles 
Rushton was born in England, and came to the United States in an early 
day, locating in Wisconsin, where for a number of years he was engaged 

in farming. 

George F. Rushton was reared in his native state, and attended its 
public schools. Until 1872 he was engaged in farming in Wisconsin, 
but in that year he came to McHenry County, with his parents, who 
settled in the town of Alden, and engaged in farming. While on the 
farm Mr. Rushton entered the railway mail service, and remained in it 
for seven years, when he resigned on account of poor health, and again 
gave his time to farming. A Republican, in 1890 he was elected super- 
visor of his township, serving four years. In 1894 he was elected county 
clerk of McHenry County, and served for sixteen years in that capacity, 
retiring to engage in the real estate business. He was one of the original 
stockholders at the organization of the American National Bank of 
Woodstock, and served as one of the directors from the beginning, later 
being chosen vice-president, a position he still holds. 

In 1905 Mr. Rushton married Joan M. Berger, a daughter of Peter 
Berger, and she died June 30, 1913. A dignified, capable and widely- 
known man, Mr. Rushton exemplifies the best interests of his community, 
and is held in the highest regard by all who know him. 



JOHN WINTHROP SANBORN. 

John Winthrop Sanborn, now deceased, was one of the retired farmers 
of Burton Township. Not long before his death he disposed of his fine 
farm in this township, which was located one and one-half miles north- 
east of Spring Grove. He was born on this farm December 28, 1842, a 
son of John and Mehitabel (Sanborn) Sanborn, and grandson of Winthrop 
Sanborn, both natives of Salisburg, N. H. Originally there were three 
brothers in the Sanborn family who came to the American Colonies from 
England, and from them have come three distinct branches. In 
England the family is traced back for seven hundred years and a gene- 
alogy of it was published, giving these branches and all the descendants. 
The name was originally spelled Sanborne, but the final letter has since 
been eliminated. 

John Sanborn was married at Salisburg, his wife being a cousin. 
They came west in 1830, to Michigan, and in 1837 to Illinois, securing 



830 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

the tract of land recently sold by John W. Sanborn, from the govern- 
ment. Winthrop Sanborn came with his son to the west, his wife having 
died in New Hampshire, and he died in McHenry County in the spring 
of 1842, being then eighty-two years old. At the time of his demise, 
his grandson, J. W. Sanborn, was six weeks old. The old militia coat he 
wore in the service is still a cherished possession of Mr. Sanborn. John 
Sanborn served during the War of 1812 at Portsmouth, N. H., as 
gunner of the fort, and his shots fore, aft and direct, caused the flag of 
surrender to be raised on a British vessel loaded with clothing that had 
been driven by storm into that port. In 1836, while still in Michigan, 
John Sanborn was called into service to quell old Black Hawk, who came 
as far as Fort Dearborn, Chicago. After coming to McHenry County 
he had to contend with the claims of English settlers, and assisted other 
Americans on English Prairie to maintain and retain their rights, includ- 
ing the Stevens family. He was one of the organizers of the township, 
served it as supervisor, and was a staunch Democrat. At first he used 
to go to Michigan City, Mich., one hundred miles away, with a cart 
hauled by four yoke of oxen, in which he could carry one hundred bushels 
of wheat to be ground at the mill there, bringing back flour for the 
neighborhood. This trip made in this way took a month. Later he 
was one of the founders of the Blivins mill at Spring Grove, and he 
displayed his public spirit in many other ways. 

John Sanborn had a family as follows: Levina, who married S. P. 
Orvis, died on the old farm in 1918, but Mr. Orvis survives and a sketch 
of him appears elsewhere in this work; John W., whose name heads this 
review; Clorinda, who died at the age of twelve years; B. F., lives at 
Nice, Ore., having left McHenry County thirty-six years ago; Minerva, 
who died at the age of twelve years. 

When his father died in 1866 John W. Sanborn took charge of the 
old homestead of 269 acres which he recently sold. Here, until his 
retirement, he carried on general farming and dairying, breeding Holstein 
cattle. While a Democrat, he worked with the Prohibitionists, and 
fought the saloon element. Unlike some reformers, he was spared to 
see some results from his work in this direction, and no one was more 
pleased with the new amendment than he. For forty years he held 
office, having been township collector, road commissioner and school 
director. Pie was a charter member of the Richmond Post, but later 
became a member of the Kenosha Post, and kept in touch with the 
members of his old regiment. 

On May 22, 1869, Mr. Sanborn was married to Olive Walker, who 



HISTORY OF MeHENRY COUNTY 831 

died December 20, 1902. On August 25, 1905, he was married (second) 
to Mrs. Kate (Patterson) Shotliff, widow of William Shotliff, of Burton 
Township, and a daughter of Robert and Nancy (Shaw) Patterson, 
who lived at Harvard, and later at Woodstock. Mrs. Sanborn was born 
in County Tyrone, Ireland, and was but a child when brought to the 
United States. Mr. Shotliff was a blacksmith of Spring Grove for 
twenty-six years, and died December 18, 1900. By his first marriage 
John W. Sanborn had the following children: Clyde Walker, who died 
in 1913, aged forty-four years, having lived in Richmond Township; 
Harry Winthrop, who is a. carpenter of Lake Geneva, Wis.; Flora Mabel, 
who married C. C. Orvis, attorney at Oskaloosa, Iowa; Guy Chelsea, 
who is a farmer of Oklahoma; Lillian, who is now a Chicago school 
teacher, was formerly a teacher of Mcllenry County; and Wade Hamp- 
ton, who is a farmer of Burton Township. By his second marriage Mr. 
Sanborn has one son, John B., who is attending school. Mrs. Sanborn 
had five children b3 r her first marriage, namely: Walter E., who lives at 
Spring Grove; Alice M., who married Joseph Wagner, a confectioner of 
Spring Grove; Fred V., who is on the Sanborn farm; William H., who 
lives at Spring Grove; and Mabel Helen, who is Mrs. Leonard Franzen 
of Spring Grove. On January 16, 1920, Mr. Sanborn died, and in his 
passing Burton Township suffered a distinct loss. His memory is 
cherished by a wide circle to whom he had endeared himself by his many 
admirable traits of character. 



FREDERICK W. SANFORD. 

Frederick W. Sanford, manager of the Richmond yards of the Barker 
Lumber Company, is an experienced man in his line, and a prominent 
resident of McHenry County. He was born in New York state, March 
22, 1859, one of six children born to William H. and Mary E. (Jackson) 
Sanford. William H. Sanford was born in Connecticut, and was a 
hatter and merchant tailor. Both he and his wife are now deceased. 

Frederick W. Sanford was brought to McHenry County by his 
parents and attended its common and high schools. After a stay at 
Woodstock, the family came to Richmond. Frederick W. Sanford 
learned the trade of a painter and paperhanger, and worked at both 
until 1898, when he became identified with the Barker Lumber Company, 
one of the largest concerns of McHenry County, with headquarters in 



>::•_' HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

Wisconsin. He was first superintendent of the Richmond yards, and 
was then promoted to be manager and has held this position for sixteen 
.years. 

In February, 1896, Mr. Sanford was married to Miss Emma C. 
Stewart, a daughter of Charles Stewart, of McHenry County. Mr. and 
Mrs. Sanford became the parents of the following children: Cyrus H., 
who is a veteran of the World War, in which he served as an enlisted 
man; Helen M., who is a popular teacher of Evanston, 111.; Leslie B., 
who also enlisted for service in the World's War, was wounded in France; 
Jessie C, who is holding an office position in Chicago; and Eugene C. 
and Dorothy M., both of whom are at home. Mr. Sanford is a Repub- 
lican, and is now a trustee of the village board. He served as chief of 
police of Woodstock and deputy sheriff of McHenry County. His 
fraternal connections are with Richmond Lodge No. 143, A. F. & A. M. 
A man of wide experience and natural ability, he has risen steadily and 
deserves the prosperity which has attended his efforts. 



ANTON SCHAEFER. 



Anton Schaefer, one of the most representative men of Spring Grove 
occupies his talents in a diversity of interests, carrying on a high-class 
undertaking and furniture business, a bank and a farm. He was born 
in Rhein Bezirh Coblenz, Kreis Maiern, Germany, August 3, 1871. 
When he was three years old he was brought to the United States by 
his parents, Mathias and Kathern Schaefer, who located in McHenry 
County where relatives had already settled. Mathias Schaefer secured 
a farm from the United States government and went to work to develop 
it. He was one of the most thorough of farmers, who made experiments 
in order to find out what kind of crops were best fitted for his land. 
Among others he tried raising alfalfa and the results were such that he 
continued to produce it for many years, being the first to grow it in this 
region. He remained on his farm until his death in 1900, when he was 
about seventy-five years old, his widow surviving him, and living on the 
farm near Johnsburg. They wen; devout members of St. John's Catholic 
church of Johnstown. 

Anton Schaefer remained fit home until he was seventeen years 
old, at which time he learned to be a carpenter and house mover, 
working at Johnstown for ten years. In 1901 he came to Spring Grove 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY s.'i:; 

where he stalled in the furniture and undertaking business, which he 

still conducts. Ho, John II. Gerbracht and J. H. Meredith founded 
the Spring drove Bank in 1905, as a private financial institution, of 
which he became sole owner, Mr. Meredith having moved to Pennsyl- 
vania, and Mr. Gerbracht to Dakota. There are about $50,000 in 
deposits. The business is strictly a banking one, and is a great accom- 
modation to tlie community. It is now a state bank, having been re- 
organized. Mr. Schaefer has a forty-eight acre farm near Spring Grove, 
and rents other lands, his farming being principally done by others. 
He carries on dairying and has a flock of Cotswold sheep. Mr. Schaefer 
was the first president of Spring Grove and is still on the village board. 

In 1894, when he was twenty-three years old, Mr. Schaefer was 
married to Kate Frcund, a daughter of John F. Freund of Johnstown, 
and they became the parents of the following children: Mary, who is 
assistant cashier of the bank, Nicholas, Christina, Anna, William, 
Mathew, and Paulina and Alvina, twins, Anton and George, all of whom 
are at home. The family all belongs to St. Peter's Catholic church of 
Spring Grove. Through persistent effort Mr. Schaefer has steadily 
risen, giving to each line of endeavor due attention, and is justly re- 
garded as one of the men of substance in the county, and one in whom 
implicit confidence may be placed. 



HENRY J. SCHMID, M. D. 

i 

Henry J. Schmid, M. D., one of the eminent physicians and surgeons 
of McHenry County, is engaged in an active practice at Harvard, 
where he has won the confidence of his community. He was born at 
Racine, Wis., December 25, 1875, one of the nine children of Simon and 
Mary (Smith) Schmid. Simon Schmid was born in Switzerland, but 
came to the United States in 1865, and, locating at Racine, Wis., he 
became interested in a manufacturing line, and continued a resident of 
(his county until his death, which occurred in 1904. 

Doctor Schmid attended the common and high schools of his native 
city and then entered Leola University, from which he was graduated 
in 1900, following which he took a medical course at Bennett Medical 
and Surgical Institute, from which he was graduated in 1909, following 
which he commenced practicing his profession. In 1910 he came to 
Harvard, where he has since remained. Doctor Schmid belongs to the 



834 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

McHenry County Medical Society, the Illinois State Medical Society 
and the American Medical Association. 

On April 18, 1901, Doctor Schmid was married to Miss Mayme 
Summers, a daughter of John Summers of Richfield, Wis. They have 
had the following children: Winnifred J., Grace M., Ruth M. and Henry 
N., who died January 11, 1919. Doctor and Mrs. Schmid are members 
of the Catholic church. Politically he is a Republican. A scholarly 
man, he keeps thoroughly abreast of the times in his profession, and his 
skill, augmented by his learning, makes him one of the most able prac- 
titioners of the county. 



ANTON M. SCHMITT. 



Anton M. Schmitt, one of the prosperous farmers of McHenry 
Township, is located on the old homestead of his father, three miles 
northeast of McHenry and bordering on the Fox River. He was born 
on this farm, October 30, 1882, the youngest son of Stephen and Maria 
(Clapprich) Schmitt. Stephen Schmitt was ten years old when his 
father, Martin Schmitt brought him to McHenry County, and he be- 
came one of its leading men and heavy landowners. A complete sketch 
of this excellent man and good citizen is to be found elsewhere in this 
work. 

Anton M. Schmitt was reared on the homestead and attended the 
schools of the district. His life work has been farming and he under- 
stands it in all its branches. For some years he has made dairying his 
chief work, and milks about thirty cows. His place is in prime condi- 
tion, having been thoroughly improved. In 1920 he erected his present 
house. On May 5, 1920 Mr. Schmitt was married to Kathrine Lay 
Freund. 

Anton M. Schmitt belongs to St. John's Catholic church at Johns- 
burg, of which his father was a leading member. He has never taken 
any part in politics. Although his fine farm is located on the Fox- 
River and only three-quarters of a mile from Pistakee Bay, noted for 
its excellent fishing, Mr. Schmitt does not care for the sport, preferring 
to devote himself to increasing its already high state of fertility, and 
bringing about a still higher rate of efficiency in the conduct of the affairs 
of his property. He is a member of the Knights of Columbus and 
Catholic Order of Forresters. 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 835 

JOHN M. SCHMITT. 

John M. Schmitt, one of the substantial men of McHenry County, 
and one who has taken active part in its agricultural operations, lives 
one mile north of Johnsburg, and three and one-half miles north of 
McHenry. He was born May 11, 1872, on the old Schmitt homestead, 
now occupied by his brother Anton, which is located three miles northeast 
of McHenry, and bordering on the Fox River, a son of Stephen and 
Maria (Klapprich) Schmitt. Stephen Schmitt was born in Bavaria, 
Germany, May 25, 1832, and came to the United States in 1842, with 
his parents, who settled on the south side of the Fox River, at the point 
now crossed by the bridge, and there Martin Schmitt lived until his 
death, when he was over ninety years of age. His wife, Gertie, died 
when she was about sixty years old. In addition to his son Stephen, 
Martin Schmitt had the following children: Anna, who married Jacob 
Freund, lived in McHenry County; Mary, who married John F. Schmitt 
and also lived in McHenry County; Mary Ann, who married Anton 
Meyer; and Frederick. All are now deceased. 

At the time of his marriage Stephen Schmitt located on the farm 
now owned by Anton Schmitt, and at that time the land was all covered 
with heavy timber. He cleared off the land, made it into a fine farm, 
and built the present house in 1872, and the barns at different periods. 
His death occurred on his farm September 17, 1917. He lost his wife 
July 2, 1914. Although he lived on the farm until his death, he had 
been retired for seven years prior to that event. He added to his 
original farm until he had 150 acres, and he owned another farm of 134 
acres near Ringwood, and 169 acres now the property of his son, John M., 
which was two miles from his homestead. His land cost him different 
prices, the highest being $65, but he bought his original tract for $27 
per acre. During the time he was engaged in farming, he produced 
sheep as his leading feature. A Democrat, he upheld the principles of 
that party with his vote, but did not desire office. A charter member 
of St. John's Catholic Church, he assisted in building four church 
edifices, and was one of the most active workers in the parish. 

Stephen Schmitt was married to Catherine Kaut, who died two years 
later, leaving one daughter, Elizabeth, who married Matt Miller, a 
farmer in the vicinity of Johnsburg. Mr. Schmitt was married (second) 
to Maria Klapprich, and their children were as follows: Susie, who is 
unmarried; Maggie, who is Mrs. John J. Schmitt, lives on the farm 
adjoining her father's homestead; John M., whose name heads this 



836 HISTORY OF McHENBY COUNTY 

review; Mary M., who married .Jacob M. Diedrich, died when she was 
twenty-four years old; Ann, who is Mrs. J. P. Schaefer, of Johnsburg; 
and Anton, who is on the old homestead, married Mrs. Kathrine Freund. 

John M. Schmitt remained at home until he was twenty-four years 
old, at which time he was married to Elizabeth Thelen, of Johnsburg. 
Following his marriage, John M. Schmitt bought his present farm, since 
which time he has erected a silo, the house, barns and other buildings 
having been put up by his father, who had been the former owner. Mr. 
Schmitt carries on dairying, and keeps about thirty cows, nearly all of 
which are registered Holsteins. For the past eighteen years he has 
operated a threshing machine, and is acknowledged to be one of the best 
threshers in the county. In addition to this work, he fills silos, hulls 
clover and shreds corn, doing this work for the same customers year 
after year. 

Mr. and Mrs. Schmitt became the parents of the following children: 
Susie, Anton, Joseph, George, Albert, Louis, Henry, Emil, Mary, Eva, 
Alma and Steve. All of the Schmitt family, in its several branches, are 
held in high esteem and respect, and they are generally to be found 
tilling the soil and helping to maintain the country's prestige as the 
greatest dairy section in the state, for this is a line of business they like 
and understand. The farms under the Schmitt management are well 
developed and finely improved, and a credit to the township and county 
in which they are located. 



STEPHEN F. SCHMITT. 

Stephen F. Schmitt, one of the honored residents of McHenry 
County, is now living in retirement from the activities of life at Johns- 
burg. He was born on the Fox River, one and one-half miles from 
Johnsburg, February 28, 1856, a son of John and Mary Schmitt. who 
were born at Munich, Bavaria, Germany, and brought to the United 
States in childhood. They were married at Johnsburg. John Schmitt 
was a son of Frederick Schmitt, and his wife was a daughter of Martin 
Schmitt, both of Munich, who came to the United States at the same 
time. 

Stephen F. Schmitt was reared on his father's farm near Johnsburg, 
where he remained until he was married at the age of twenty-one years, 
to Catherine Freund, a daughter of Nicholas Freund. Mrs. Schmitt 




Q*Jb~® (h^&±^. 



HISTORY OF MeHENRY COUNTY 837 

was bom near Johnsburg, and was eighteen years old at the time of her 
marriage. The young couple rented the farm owned by his grand- 
father, Martin Schmitt, but after five years they moved to the farm 
owned by Nicholas Freund, two miles north of Johnsburg, where they 
spent three or four years. They then bought a farm one and one-half 
miles north of Ringwood, consisting of eighty acres of improved land, 
(in which there was a new barn. After some years on it, Mr. Schmitt 
rented that farm, and moved on his father's farm, which he operated 
for twenty years, and finally bought it for $67 per acre. The farm con- 
tained 198 acres, and he still owns it, his son, Matt conducting it at 
present. Mr. Schmitt owns valuable property at Spring Grove and 
his pleasant home at Johnsburg, where he has resided for two years. 

Mr. and Mrs. Schmitt became the parents of the following children: 
Matt, who is on the homestead; John, who is in the employ of the United 
States government as inspector of fishing at Spring Grove; Joseph, who 
is on the farm with Matt; Mary, who is the next in order of birth; Anna, 
,vho is Mis. Matt Lay, lives at Spring Grove; Emma, who is Mrs. John 
Lay, of Spring Grove; Christina, who is Mrs. Peter Miller of Spring 
Grove; and Agnes, who is at home. Mr. Schmitt has done considerable 
road work, and has long been a friend to the "Good Roads" movement. 
He and his family belong to St. John's Catholic church of Johnsburg. 



FRED H. SCHROEDER. 

Fred H. Schroedcr, proprietor of the Crystal Lake Garage, agent for 
the Dodge and Oakland motor cars and a director of the United State 
Bank of Crystal Lake, is one of the foremost business men of his part 
of the county. He was born at Crystal Lake, July 31, 1874, a son of 
Chailcs YV. and Fredcricka (Oerkfitz) Schroeder. Charles W. Schroeder 
was born in Germany, but came to the United States in 1870, landing 
in New York City, from whence he came to Crystal Lake. He took 
out citizen papers and was loyal to his adopted country until his death, 
which occurred January 9, 1918. Until 1904, he was extensively en- 
gaged in farming, but in that year retired. His wife died in 1903. 

Fred H. Schroeder attended the common and high schools of 
McHenry Count}', and then, until 1913, was engaged in farming, having 
learned the practical details of his calling from his father. In 1913 he 
bought his present business from William J. Mayers for $3,500. Mr. 



838 HISTORY OF McIIENRY COUNTY 

Schroeder immediately added to the stock on hand, and now carries a 
full and complete line of auto tires and accessories, as well as of the 
International Harvester Company farm machines, and he has the 
agencies for the Dodge, Oakland cars. His business is a very large one, 
and is steadily increasing. When the United State Bank of Crystal 
Lake was organized, Mr. Schroeder was placed on the directorate and 
has continued a member of that board ever since. 

In 1893 Mr. Schroeder was married to Miss Matilda Wokersin, a 
daughter of William Wokersin, and a member of one of the well-known 
families of Crystal Lake. Mr. and Mrs. Schroeder have two children: 
Alfred W. and Walter W. Alfred W. is working for his father. He 
was married to Anna Schroeder. The family belong to the Lutheran 
Church of Crystal Lake. In politics, Mr. Schroeder is a Republican. 



OTTO H. SCHULDT. 



Otto H. Schuldt, manager of the Bowman Dairy plant of Carey, is 
one of the men who is eminently fitted for his work. He was born at 
Crystal Lake, 111., May 2, 1892, and has spent his life in McHenry 
County, where his father is very well and favorably known. He is one 
of eight children born to his parents, William and Sophia (Peters) 
Schuldt, natives of Germany, who came to the United States in 1890, 
and located at Crystal Lake, where they still reside, being farming 
people. 

Otto H. Schuldt attended the public schools of Crystal Lake, and 
then learned the carpenter trade, following it until 1913, when he went 
with the Oatman Milk Company, leaving that concern in November, 
1918, to assume the duties of his present position. His plant has a 
capacity of 18,000 pounds of milk per day, and employment is given to 
five people. 

In 1913 Mr. Schuldt was united in marriage with Miss Clara Fanter, 
a daughter of William Fanter, one of the prominent men of Crystal 
Lake. Mr. and Mrs. Schuldt have two children, namely: Gladys and 
Mildred. Politically, Mr. Schuldt is a Republican. An aggressive 
worker, Mr. Schuldt not only is able to accomplish much himself, but 
can get the best results from his associates, and during the time he has 
been in charge of his present plant has demonstrated his fitness for his 
position, and inspired confidence in his community. 



HISTORY OF McHENEY COUNTY 839 

ROBERT H. SCHUETT. 

]\ol)ert H. Schuett, senior member of the well-known and reliable 
grocery and hardware firm of Schuett & Ferris of Woodstock, is one of the 
substantial men of McHenry County. He was born February 7, 1890, 
in McHenry County, one of the eight children of John C. and Matilda 
(Eherke) Schuett. John C. Schuett was born in Germany, but came 
to the United States in 1870, and the following year, to McHenry County, 
where he has since resided, becoming one of the prosperous farmers of 
Dorr Township. 

Robert II. Schuett attended the common and high schools of Mc- 
Henry County, and grew up amid rural surroundings learning farm 
work under his father. Later he entered the employ of A. K. Bunker, 
and after remaining with him for five years, in April, 1918, he and his 
present associate formed their partnership under the style of Schuett 
& Ferris. The young men have a wide acquaintance throughout the 
county, and their business shows a steady and healthy expansion. 

On June 6, 1917, Mr. Schuett was married to Miss Mabel Grover. 
Mr. Schuett belongs to the Odd Fellows. A young man of steady 
habits and great industry, he has risen through his own efforts and de- 
serves his present prosperity. 



JAMES SCOTT. 



James Scott, one of the men who has attained to considerable prestige 
as a successful farmer of Seneca Township, was born at Woodstock, . 
April 28, 1857, a son of William and Jeanette (Lindsay) Scott, both 
born near Glasgow at Strathwell, Scotland. When he was twenty 
years old he came to the United, States, and she was brought here when 
about five years old by her parents, Thomas and Mary Lindsay, who 
settled two miles south of Woodstock, in Dorr Township, where they 
spent their lives, he being killed by a blast of powder. 

James Scott grew up on the farm owned by his father, and lived 
there until his marriage on February 15, 1882, when he was twenty-five 
years old, to Emma Andrews, a daughter of Dwight and Emma M. 
(Sears) Andrews, who came to Seneca Township many years ago, locat- 
ing on a farm there about 1854. During the Civil War Mr. Andrews 
enlisted for service in Company E, Ninety-fifth Illinois Volunteer In- 



840 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

fantry at Franklinville, and served until the close of the war, during 
which period he was for one year one of the Bharp-shooters. He died 
two years after his discharge as a result of injuries received in the service, 
and is buried in the pioneer cemetery of the township. His widow 
survived him until about 1903, living in Seneca. The Andrews family 
numbered the following children: Chester L., who lives at Elgin, 111.; 
Ella, who is Mrs. William Wheeler of Los Angeles, Cal.; and Mrs. 
Scott, who was born in Seneca Township, May 19, 1859, where she was 
reared. 

In 1S93 Mr. and Mrs. Scott moved on their present farm of 163 
acres, once known as the Albee farm, from which the pioneer cemetery 
and site for the school were taken some years ago. Mr. Scott has made 
all of the present improvements, and has a comfortable residence and 
suitable barn and outbuildings. He is carrying on dairy farming, and 
milks about twenty-five cows of the Holstein strain. He is a strong 
Republican and has served as road commissioner for six years. Mr. 
and Mrs. Scott became the parents of the following children: William 
R., who lives at Fond du Lac, Wis., is foreman of a factory; Harold C, 
who is at home; and James Earl, who is now at home, was in the service 
dining the World War, from June 3, 1918, until his honorable discharge, 
March 21, 1919, during that period being in the Great Lakes Training 
School. The Scott family attend the Presbyterian church at Wood- 
stock. Mr. Scott and his wife are connected with some of the old and 
best-known families of McHenry County, and having been born in the 
county, and spent their lives here, their interests are naturally centered 
in it and they take an intelligent pride in its development. 



GEORGE W. SEAMAN. 

George W. Seaman, one of the most interesting men of McHenry 
( ounty, who has been spared to live to an age far exceeding the ordinary 
span of life, is living retired on a farm two miles northeast of Hebron, in 
Hebron Township. He is remarkable, and although ninety-five years 
old, is better preserved than most men fifteen years younger. Iiis 
mind is keen, his recollection is clear, eyesight fairly good, and his 
hearing perfect. Upright as a pine, he gives no indication of approaching 
the century milestone. On his ninety-fifth birthday a party was given 
him, a half a dozen of his old friends being invited to the house, and as 






HISTORY OF McIIENRY COt'NTY 841 

though pre-arranged, an airplane passed over as though in honor of the 
event. His span of life covers the greatest period in the world's history, 
and his mentality has been .such that he has been able to appreciate the 
wonderful development of this age. He was born in Madison County, 
N. Y. 

His early efforts at fanning were with the primitive implements that 
showed but little improvement over those of the stone age. He used 
the first machine that took the place of the flail in threshing grain, and 
consisted of a cylinder made of a log, with spikes driven into it for teeth 
in a frame that also carried a converse similarly made. The power was 
a one-horse tread mill. The grain, straw and chaff all fell in a head, 
from which the straw was raked off by hand and the final separation of 
the grain from the chaff was made with a hand windmill. Mr. Seaman 
operated this machine in this region during 1845. The owner was 
Vunar Potter, a brother-in-law of Jackson Case, of Racine, Wis., brother 
of J. J. Case, renowned maker of threshing machines. Jackson Case 
had brought eight of these tread power machines from Oswego, N. Y., 
in 1S44. In 1846 Mr. Seaman operated the first separator ever brought 
to Illinois, and it was also a tread power contrivance. The first experi- 
ment with it was made at Solon Mills, with 150 bushels of wheat as the 
result of the first operation. Later, in company with his brother 
Leonard and brother-in-law A. C. Cleary, Mr* Seaman operated a short 
sweep power machine for six years, and during that period it came into 
universal use, onlj r to be superseded by the steam power machine. 
About this time a company at Geneva, 111., commenced manufacturing 
various kinds of machinery and he became a salesman for it in northern 
Illinois, continuing with the concern for sixteen years, and later selling 
grain binders in Nebraska. 

In 1S44 his father, Leonard Seaman, came to McHenry and entered 
land to the extent of forty acres, one mile east of Hebron, and the next 
year brought his family to this new home, including George, Leonard B., 
and Thomas J. A daughter, Betsy, and her husband, A. C. Cleary, 
also accompanied the party. Later removal was made to Vernon 
County, Wis., the original farm being sold. Still later, Leonard Seaman 
and his sons bought 240 acres of land further north and on it he made 
his permanent home. This farm was fenced with rails made in the 
Geneva woods, eight miles distant. On this farm Leonard Seaman 
died in 1855, but his widow survived him until she was over seventy. 
Leonard B. Seaman continued to live on his father's farm and died there. 



842 HISTORY OF McIIENRY COUNTY 

Thomas J. Seaman sold his share to his brothers and went to Vernon 
County, Wis., and is now deceased. 

The coming of the Seaman family to McHenry County resulted in 
the settling here of several other families from Oswego, N. Y. George 
Brown, a cousin of George Seaman, came here in 1844, but soon returned 
to New York. His four brothers, Edmond, Jacob, Isaac and Thomas, 
and a sister, Lucretia, who later married F. A. Stewart, also came here. 
Mrs. Stewart survives and lives in Howard County, Nebr., where Jacob 
Brown died. Thomas died in Colorado, and Isaac died near Seattle, 
Wash. Edmond died soon after coming to Hebron. John A. Rotnaur, 
another neighbor of New York, who followed the Seamans to McHenry 
County, bought the original farm of forty acres from Leonard Seaman, 
and he died in Richmond Township. Alphonso Tyler and his wife 
settled in the neighborhood of the Seamans and died here. F. A. 
Stewart and Lorenzo Stewart came to Lake County, 111., about 1855, 
and died there. A son of Lorenzo Stewart, R. P. Stewart, left McHenry 
County in 1880 and now lives in Hull County, Nebr. During the Civil 
War he served in the Sixty-sixth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and as a 
result of that service later lost his right arm. He is now over eighty 
years old and makes frequent visits to Hebron. 

George W. Seaman has lived on his present farm since 1863, as he 
lost his former farm through mortgaging it to invest in a "Blue Sky" 
project with relation to a proposed railroad, out of which he only 
managed to save $1,000, which he immediately put on his present farm 
of 160 acres as a first payment. Since he took possession of it the farm 
has been handsomely improved and is well adapted for dairy purposes. 
There are two silos and all the necessary conveniences. Mr. Seaman 
is by several years the oldest resident of Hebron Township, and is the 
only one now living who was here when the township was organized in 
1847. When his brother Thomas J. Seaman was elected tax collector, 
he refused to serve, and George W. Seaman took his place and made the 
first actual tax collection for the township, amounting to about $500, 
and he was reelected for a second term. In those days the collector was 
required to call personally on every taxpaper, a job few men cared for. 
Mr. Seaman served for many years as road commissioner, and there are 
few roads in this township that he has not assisted in improving. The 
township was named by Mrs. Belia H. Tryon, who selected it on account 
of its biblical associations. The John Sawyer district west of Hebron 
village, and the Alvin H. Parker district, were both organized about the 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 843 

same time as the township, and Mr. Seaman recalls that Miss Archibald 
and Elizabeth Ellsworth were among the earliest teachers. 

George W. Seaman was married September 30, 1849, to Jane Currier, 
a daughter of Abner Currier, who came to McIIenry County from 
Pennsylvania in 1847, and became a neighbor of the Seamans. Later 
the Curriers moved to Vernon County, Wis.; Mrs. Seaman died Septem- 
ber 20, 1914, within ten days of the sixty-fifth anniversary of her wedding, 
an event the children were preparing to celebrate as they had the one of 
the golden anniversary. Mr. and Mrs. Seaman had five children, 
namely: Helen, who died young; Susie, who was the widow of Neverson 
Gookin, died at the age of seventy-three; Charles H., who is agent for 
the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad at Salem, Wis.; George Fr., who 
with his brother, William G., operates the homestead, although they live 
in separate houses. George E. married Jennie Reynolds, and their 
children are as follows: Jay, Cora, Clifford, Clarence and Dene. William 
G. married Mabel Critchett and they have two sons, Kenneth and Lyle. 
Myra Stamper, five years old, is also a member of the family, and no one 
is fonder of the children than Mr. Seaman, who in their companionship 
forgets the loss of his former acquaintances now deceased. He keeps in 
touch with the world's events, and is especially interested in the progress 
made in mechanics. During the St. Louis Exposition he spent some 
time there, and enjoyed the exhibits in Machinery Hall more than any 
of the others. 



CALVIN SEARLE. 
Page 136. 

GUSTAVE F. SEEFELDT. 

Gustave F. Seefeldt, member of the well known dry goods establish- 
ment of Mutchow Bros. & Co., of Harvard, and president of the Com- 
munity Club, is one of the representative business men of McHenry 
County. He was born in Alsace-Lorraine, February 22, 1879, one of 
the eleven children of Charles C. and Elvina (Vouwangerin) Seefeldt. 
Charles C. Seefeldt was born in France, but came to the United States 
and located at Milwaukee, Wis., with his family. He died in 1885, his 
widow surviving him until 1900. 



M! HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

Gustave F. Seefelt attended the parochial schools of Milwaukee, 
Wis., and was reared on his brother's farm on the outskirts of that city. 
For a time Gustave F. Seefeldt was engaged in farming, but then became 
associated with the Milwaukee Electric plant, and remained with it 
until 1903, when he went to Chicago, 111., and was there connected with 
the mercantile trade. In October, 1910, Mr. Seefeldt came to Harvard 
and was associated with the sales force of Mutchow Bros, until 1916, 
when he was admitted to partnership. This concern is the leading dry- 
goods house at Harvard, and a full and varied line of timely goods is 
carried to the amount of $20,000. Employment is given to seven 
salespersons, and the service is excellent. 

In 1904 Mr. Seefeldt was married to Miss Freda Demien, a daughter 
of John Demien, well known people of Chicago, 111. Mr. and Mrs. 
Seefeldt have two children, namely: Clarence W. and Earl F. In 
politics Mr. Seefeldt is a Republican. In January, 1919, he was elected 
president of the Community Club, and has extended the scope of its 
usefulness. In every capacity Mr. Seefeldt measures up to the highest 
standards of efficiency and good citizenship, and is rightly numbered 
among the representative men of his locality. 



ELLSWORTH E. SEWARD. 

Ellsworth E. Seward, president of the Dairyman's State Bank of 
Marengo, and treasurer of the Coon Creek Drainage District, is one of 
the leading men of McHenry County, and one who has long been ac- 
tively engaged in promoting its best interests. He was born in Mc- 
Henry County, 111., May 27, 1861, a son of Ephraim H. and Mary L. 
(Rogers) Seward, who had eleven children, four of whom survive. 
Ephraim H. Seward was born in Vermont, but later came to McHenry 
County, where he was engaged in farming until his death. His wife 
is also deceased. 

Ellsworth E. Seward attended the common and high schools of his 
native county, and after studying law, was admitted to the bar of South 
Dakota, to which state he had gone in 1885. He was successively 
engaged in the newspaper business, a real-estate business, and then 
with the Shurtleff Lumber Company. This concern later became the 
Seward & Rcdpath Lumber Company, with which Mr. Seward remained 
until 1908. In that year he was made a director and also vice president 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 845 

of the Dairyman's State Hank of Marengo. In 1910 was made its presi- 
dent. J. E. Williams being now vice president and A. S. Norton, cashier. 
Mr. Seward owns 400 acres of valuable farm land in Riley Township. 

On May 19, 1898, Mr. Seward was married to Miss Caroline Metcalf, 
a daughter of Martin Metcalf. Mr. and Mrs. Seward have two children, 
namely: Eunice L., who was born in 1905; and Martin, who was born 
in 1910. The family all belong to the Presbyterian church. He is a 
Republican. His fraternal relations are with the Masons and Knights 
of Pythias. Mr. Seward is a Shriner and Thirty-Second degree Mason. 
For some time he has been vice president of the McHenry County 
Bankers Association, and is recognized as one of the leading men of 
his calling in the county. Under his sound administration, his bank 
lias tided over the stringency of the war and reconstruction period, and 
its affairs are in excellent condition. 



ADDISON M. SHELTON. 

The day of the little red schoolhouse has passed, and with it the 
type of schoolmaster who used to preside over the destinies of the pupils 
gathered in it. While this little red schoolhouse has been replaced by 
modern sanitary buildings, amply provided with every convenience 
and appliance known to present-day methods, the schoolmaster also, 
has gone through a period of transition. He has developed into a 
member of one of the honored and learned professions; a man who 
comes to his work only after years of special preparation, and who, no 
matter what his qualifications may be, never ceases to be a close student, 
not alone of books, but of human nature as well. Because of the great 
progress made in educational matters many men of exceptional talents 
have been attracted to the profession, and they in turn are exerting them- 
selves to achieve still better results, and succeeding in a manner to call 
forth commendation and appreciation. One of these alert, scholarly 
and carefully trained men of brilliant minds whose capabilities are 
centered in educational work is Addison M. Shelton, of Crystal Lake, 
county superintendent of schools of McHenry County. 

The birth of Addison M. Shelton occurred at Chatham, 111., Novem- 
ber 11, 1875, and he is a son of Martin Shelton, who was born at 
Chatham, 111., February 25, 1844, and Sarah (Dill) Shelton, who was 
born at Chatham, HI., January 25, 1849, the former of whom was a 



846 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

farmer. The ancestors of the Sheltons came to the American Colonies 
at a very early date. Records of the family history show that members 
of it participated in the French and Indian War, the Revolutionary 
War, the War of 1812, and Martin Shelton volunteered for service in 
the Civil War and served until its close. 

After his graduation from the local high school, Addison M. Shelton 
spent one year at the State Normal School at Carbondale, 111., and then 
later became a student of the University of Illinois, from which he was 
graduated in 1903 from the Political Science group with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. Immediately following his graduation Mr. Shelton 
came to Crystal Lake as city superintendent of its schools, and held 
that office with dignified capability until he was elected county super- 
intendent of schools of McHenry County, which office he has held since 
1910. 

For a number of years Mr. Shelton has been identified with the 
State Teachers Association, and other educational organizations; for 
a long period he has been interested in school legislation, lepresenting 
various teachers' organizations before the legislature. Because of this 
work, and in recognition of work accomplished while he was at Spring- 
field, the presidency of the Illinois Educational Commission was given 
him by Governor Small, in September, 1921. The purpose of this 
commission is to revamp the school laws of Illinois, and to report to 
lie next General Assembly of the state, recommendations fo ■ consider- 
ation. Other members of the commission are: Mrs. M. H. Leber, 
chairman, App ied Education State Federation Woman's Clubs, of 
Winnetka; William Scott Gray, member of the Senate, of Coatsburg; 
Len Small, governor of Illinois; C. M. Thompson, dean, College of Com- 
merce and Business Administration, of Urbana; and Harry Wilson, 
member House of Representatives, of Pinckneyvillc. 

Prominent as has been the part Mr. Shelton has always taken in 
educational matters, he has not confined himself to them, but has 
accomplished much in behalf of other worthy measures He was 
intimately connected with the early organization of the McHenry 
County Soil Improvement Association, was its first secretary, and con- 
tinued to hold that office for several years. While this country was at 
war he was one of the effective workers, serv ng as one of the county 
Four Minute Men, and as chairman for McHenry County in the Thrift 
Organization during the life of that body, and he was very active in all 
of the Liberty Loan drives. Ever since he cast his first vote he has been 
a republican. He maintains membership with the Modern Woodmen 



HISTORY OF M, IIKXKY COUNTS 847 

of America, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. During 1903 he represented the 
University of Illinois in the debating team in the Illinois-M ssouri 
debate; was class poet, and was otherwise connected in an important 
degree with his class while at the university. In later years he has 
contributed some very valuable articles to educational magazines on 
timely topics. 

Mr. Shelton was married at St. Louis, Mo., in June, 1899, to Miss 
Wanda Schember, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William R. Schember, 
No. 2815 Russell avenue, St. Louis, Mo. Mr. and Mrs. Shelton have 
the following children: Robert Schember, who was born November 
2, 1906; Wanda Schember, who was born August 9, 1908; and Richard 
Martin, who was born in 1914. 

In an able address delivered before the annual conference of the 
Illinois School Board and City Superintendents Association held at 
Springfield, October 27, 1921, Mr. Shelton outlines his stand with 
reference to the work to be done by the newly-created commission of 
which he is the chairman, under the following heads: separation from 
state politics of the school tax, the advocation of taxing tangible prop- 
erty to help support the schools and the increasing of the local unit 
of the taxable area of each school district. Not only the people of 
McHenry County but the entire State are anxiously awaiting the re- 
sults of Mr. Shelton's efforts on the commission. This appointment is 
the just reward to an able man for services faithfully performed and is 
also a great opportunity for him to give to the people the benefit of his 
years of thought and study upon the subjects so dear to their heart, 
and awaken in all an appreciation of the necessity for greatly increased 
educational facilities. 



VERNON D. SHERBURNE. 

Vernon D. Sherburne, owner of the well-equipped garage at Wood- 
stock operated under his name, is one of the substantial men of McHenry 
County, and one who is held in high esteem. He was born in Michigan, 
January 28, 1871, one of three children of Albert and Jane (Pixley) 
Sherburne. Albert Sherburne was born in Canada, but came to the 
United States, first being in Michigan, and later in Wisconsin, from 
whence he came to Hebron, where he died in 1916, having spent his life 
in farming. 



848 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

Vernon D. Sherburne attended the common and high schools, and 
was graduated from the latter in 1888. For the subsequent three years 
he was engaged in school teaching. He then began assisting his father 
with the farm work until 1901, when he bought a farm of 180 acres, which 
he still owns. He farmed until 1904, and then rented his farm and 
embarked in a livestock business. This business he sold in 1911 and 
opened a garage at Hebron, moving to Woodstock in December of that 
year. In February, 1916, he bought his present property for 120,000, 
and added improvements until now his investment is worth $32,000. 
He carries a stock of $30,000, and gives employment to ten people. His 
is the largest and best-equipped garage at Woodstock, and he is sole 
agent for Ford cars, accessories and supplies. 

In 1895 Mr. Sherburne was married to Miss Anna J. Jones, a daughter 
of Jay W. Jones, of Clinton, Wis., and they have the following children: 
Clarence L., who is in business with his father; and El wood G. and 
Carroll W., who are both at home. Mr. Sherburne belongs to the Odd 
Fellows and Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. The family are 
identified with the Methodist Episcopal Church. The amount of business 
transacted by Mr. Sherburne reflects credit upon his ability as a business 
man, and upon his standing in his community. He richly deserves his 
prosperity, for it has come to him through his own unaided efforts. 



CLIFFORD E. SHERMAN. 

Clifford E. Sherman, proprietor of the Sherman Hill Farm, is located 
two miles west of McHenry, and he was born on this farm, February 8, 
1870, a son of Samuel S. and Abigail (Fellows) Sherman. Samuel S. 
Sherman was born in New York, a son of Benson and Wealthy (Gates) 
Sherman. In 1840 the Sherman family, together with that of Andrew 
Hanna, drove to McHenry County, and Benson Sherman secured quite 
a large acreage, Sherman Hill, a well-known landmark, being part of 
his property. His homestead contained over 300 acres, and his original 
log house stood about the same place as the present house. Benson 
Sherman died when but a little over fifty years of age, his widow living 
on the homestead survived him until she was eighty-six years old. His 
two sons, Jeremiah and Samuel S. received the homestead, the former 
having 150 acres, and the latter 180 acres, on which was the house. 

Samuel S. Sherman was eight vears old when his father came to 



HISTORY OP McHENRY COUNTY 849 

Sherman Hill, and he was reared on this farm. After the death of his 
wife, he gradually turned matters over to his son, Clifford E. Sherman. 
Samuel S. Sherman 1 mil t a part of the present barn, to which his son 
has since made additions, it now being 30x84 feet, with an el 32x28 

feel. 

Clifford E. Sherman attended the local schools and was reared on 
the farm. When he was twenty-one years old, he had to assume the 
responsibilities of conducting the farm. Since then he has made ex- 
tensive improvements* At his father's death he inherited eighty acres, 
and later bought the shares of the other heirs, and made the farm into 
a dairy one. Still later, he sold some of his original farm, added his 
uncle's farm of 120 acres, and now has about 250 acres, all in one body. 
The original farm of his uncle is now operated by a tenant, Mr. Sherman 
being a partner in the stock business the tenant carries on, for the second 
farm is also a dairy one. Mr. Sherman has concentrated on farming, 
but in the midst of his other duties has found time to serve as a director 
of the Sherman School district. 

Mr. Sherman was united in marriage with Laura Grace Thomas, a 
daughter of Julius and Lucy (Hobart) Thomas, of Greenwood Town- 
ship, where Mrs. Sherman was reared. Mrs. Thomas, now a widow, 
lives at Woodstock. Mr. and Mrs. Sherman have two sons, namely: 
Lester Thomas Sherman, who was born November 2, 189G; and Edwin 
Earl, who was born November 2, 1913. Lester was graduated from the 
McHenry High School, and is now assisting his father with the farm. 
Mr. Sherman is a Universalist. He supports the Free Soil Improve- 
ment Association to which he belongs. 



EDWARD D. SHURTLEFF. 

Edward D. Shurtleff, member of the lower house of the State 
Assembly, and one of the leading attorneys of McHenry County, has 
long been engaged in practice at Marengo. He was born in DeKalb 
County, 111., September 19, 1863, a son of Alfred J. and Mary F. (Higby) 
Shurtleff, who had three children. Alfred J. Shurtleff was born in 
Stanstead, Quebec, Canada, October 14, 1827, and when he was eleven 
years old he came to DeKalb County, 111., leaving it for Marengo in 1870, 
and he resided in the latter city until his death, June 8, 1895. 

Edward D. Shurtleff attended the schools of DeKalb County and the 



850 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

Marengo High School, and later Oberlin College, and after three years 
in the latter institution, entered the office of A. B. Coon, of Marengo, 
where he studied law. Going to South Dakota, he was admitted to the 
bar of that state in 1885, and upon his return to Illinois was admitted to 
the Illinois bar in 1894, immediately thereafter entering upon a practice 
at Marengo. A strong Republican, he has been very active in politics, 
serving Marengo as mayor from 1894 to 1896, and again from 1899 to 
1901, and from 1895 up to and including 1899 he was supervisor of 
Marengo Township. From 1901 he has been the representative of his 
district in the lower house of the State Assembly, and has taken an 
active part in securing some very excellent legislation. Fraternally he 
is a Mason, an Odd Fellow, Knight of Pythias and a Woodman, and has 
advanced to the Knight Templar degree in the first-named order. 

On June 25, 1890, Mr. Shurtleff was married to Miss Elizabeth H. 
Sisson, a daughter of Allan Sisson, and a member of a prominent pioneer 
family of McHenry County. Mr. and Mrs. Shurtleff have the following 
children: Maurice E., who was born September 16, 1892; and Helen E., 
who was born August 11, 1899. The family all attend the Presbyterian 
church. Both as an attorney and public official, Mr. Shurtleff has made 
an enviable record, and his fellow citizens are proud of him and of what 
he has accomplished. 



ROSS D. SILL. 



Ross D. Sill, representative of the Standard Oil Company at 
Hebron, and one of the successful men of McHenry County, owns 180 
acres of very valuable land in Hebron Township. He was born at 
Richmond, 111., in July, 1864, one of the five children of John and Mary 
( Reed) Sill. John Sill was born in England in 1840, and in young man- 
hood came to the United States, and after a stop at Chicago came to 
McHenry County, locating at Richmond, where he rounded out his 
useful life, being actively engaged in farming for many years. His 
death occurred in 1909, and his widow died that same year. 

Ross D. Sill was reared at Richmond, and attended its schools. After 
reaching his majority he learned butterniaking, and for sixteen years 
was engaged in manufacturing butter. He then moved to Hebron, 
where for some years he was superintendent of the pumping station, 
resigning to accept his present position with the Standard Oil Company. 

In 1889 Mr. Sill was united in marriage to Miss Nellie A. Andrews, 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 851 

a daughter of Steven J. Andrews, of Hebron. Mr. and Mrs. Sill have a 
daughter, Sybil A., who was born August 17, 1899. Their other daughter, 
Beulah, is deceased. The family belong to the Baptist church. Mr. Sill 
belongs to Waupin (Wis.) Lodge, A. F. & A. M. In 1918 Mr. Sill was 
elected a trustee of Hebron Township. The beautiful family residence 
at Hebron is owned by Mr. Sill, and hen- the family welcome their many 
friends, and are the center of a charming social circle. 



FRANK SILLIMAN. 



Frank Silliman, one of the representative men of Seneca Township, 
was born in this township, two miles east of Franklinville, September 
18, 1856, a son of Stiles and Martha (Burnside) Silliman, natives of 
Otsego County, N. Y., where they were married. In 1848 they came 
to Illinois to join her brother, Thomas Burnside, who had located in 
Seneca Township, some four or five years previously, and rounded out 
his life on the farm he had secured. Stiles Silliman bought a farm in 
Seneca Township about 1S52, and died on it at the age of eighty-two 
years, on December 3, 1906, his wife having passed away October 4, 
1905, aged eighty-seven years. The Silliman family originated in Con- 
necticut. On the maternal side of the house, Stiles Silliman was con- 
nected with the Brewer family, of Holland origin. The Burnside family 
traces back to English and Scotch stock. Stiles Silliman was a road 
commissioner and a school director, being elected on the Democratic 
ticket. He was one of the original members of the Woodstock Camp, 
M. W. A. The children of Stiles Silliman and his wife were as follows: 
Ella, who married Charles Foote, removed to Nebraska, where she died 
at the'age of thirty-seven years; Irene, who is Mrs. A. L. Beam of Don- 
Township; Frank, whose name heads this review; and George, who left 
the farm twenty-five years ago, is a wholesale grocer of Elgin, 111. 

Frank Silliman grew up on the farm, helping to dig stones and perform 
all the tedious work incident to developing a wild farm. On January 
30, 1883 Mr. Silliman was married to Allene Foote, a daughter of Hooker 
and Emeline (Eastman) Foote, who was brought to Seneca Township 
at the age of ten years, from Pleasant Prairie, Wis. Mr Foote was born 
in Madison County, N. Y., and Mrs. Foote in Otsego County, N. Y. 
The Foote family was founded in the New World during the Colonial 
period, representatives of it first locating in Connecticut, and going 



852 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

thence to New York. Both Mr. and Mrs. Foote were taken by their 
parents to Kenosha, Wis., when small, and were reared in that state. 
After their marriage, they kept a hotel at Pleasant Prairie for some 
years. 

Frank Silliman and his wife became the parents of the following 
children: Harry, who is on the old farm, married Ora Jackett, and has 
three children, Stanley, Mildred and Ethel; Eva, who is Mrs. Fred 
Eppel, lives near McHenry; and Vellie, who is at home, was graduated 
from the Woodstock High School and then engaged for some years in 
teaching school in Seneca Township. For four years she was secretary 
of the McHenry County Sunday School Association, which was organized 
sixty years ago. In 1905 Mr. Silliman became interested in the teach- 
ings of Dr. Alexander Dowie, but now attends the Methodist Episcopal 
church at Franklinville. Mrs. Silliman has been a member of the 
Ladies' Aid Society of Seneca Township for thirty-five years. For 
fifteen years Mr. Silliman served as school treasurer and was township 
collector for many years, handling between $7,500 to $8,000 annually. 



WILLIAM S. SINCERBOX. 

William S. Sincerbox, superintendent of the Bowman Dairy Company 
plant at Hartland, is a member of a prominent New York family, and a 
man widely and favorably known. He was born in Dutchess County, 
N. Y., December 7, 1866, one of the six children of Egbert and Sarah 
(Pierce) Sincerbox. Egbert Sincerbox was a native of New York state, 
and was a carpenter by trade. His death occurred when William S. 
Sincerbox was eleven years old. 

William S. Sincerbox attended the local schools of his native county, 
and, when he was seventeen years old, he entered the milk and dairy 
business, and has devoted his life to it. In 188S he located at Carpenter- 
ville, 111., to work in the Borden Condensed Milk plant, as pan operator, 
and remained there until 1893. In the latter year he was offered a 
position as manager of the Chemung plant, owned at that time by the 
Great Western Condensed Milk Company, and accepted, and worked 
there for two years. In 1902 he went back to the Borden Company, 
and assisted in building their Woodstock plant, of which he was superin- 
tendent for twelve years. In 1914 he went to work for the Bowman 
Dairy Company, assisting in the building of the Gary Station, Lake 




M 



p 








SISTORY OP McHENRY COUNTY 853 

Geneva and Hartland plants. He is stationed at this time as superin- 
tendent of the Bowman plant at Hartland. The capacity of the latter 
plant is 45,000 pounds of milk daily, and it is recognized by the state 
inspectors as being the best equipped in the country, the percentage 
given by them being 98^%. 

On April 8, 1894, Mr. Sincerbox was married to Miss Hattie Belshaw, 
born June 18, 1873, at Clifton, 111. She is a daughter of Ilobart and 
Angelene (Davis) Belshaw, of Kane County. Mr. and Mrs. Sincerbox 
have two children, namely: Elva A., who was born December 3, 1898; 
and Hobart I., who was born June 21, 1902. The family belong to the 
Congregational church. He politically is a Republican and fraternally 
maintains connections with Bclvidere Lodge No. 28, I. O. 0. F., and the 
Woodmen of the World. An experienced dairyman, he is giving his 
company and the people of this district expert service, and this is proven 
by the high standing of his plant. Mrs. Sincerbox is a member of the 
Daughters of Rebecca and the Woman's Relief Corps. 



JAMES H. SLATER. 



James H. Slater, manager of the Borden's Farm Products Company, 
Inc., at Ridgefield, is one of the leading dairymen of McHenry County, 
and one who thoroughly understands his business from start to finish. 
He was born in New York state, January 4, 1856, one of the six children 
of William H. and Evelyn (Sharp) Slater. William H. Slater was a 
native of New York state, but is now living at Allentown, Pa. By trade 
he is a harnessmaker. 

Growing up in his native state, James H. Slater attended its common 
schools, and learned the trade of a harnessmaker from his father, but 
after working at it until 1882, he left it to become connected with his 
present company, first as an inspector and then, in 1907, he was made 
manager of the Hampshire plant, which he built and installed in that 
same year, and he remained in charge of it until 1913, when he was 
placed in charge of the plant at Ridgefield. The Ridgefield plant was 
built in 1907, and has a capacity of 30,000 pounds daily. Mr. Slater is 
ably assisted by his bookkeeper, Daniel W. Fitzgerald. In politics Mr. 
Slater is a Republican, but he has never desired public honors. Frater- 
nally, he is a Knight of Pythias. Energetic, experienced and capable, 
Mr. Slater has brought his plant up to a high state of efficiency and at 



854 HISTORY OF McIIENRY COUNTY 

the same time won for himself a personal regard which is sincere and 
widespread. 



FRANK C. SLAVIN. 



Frank G. Slavin, mayor of Hebron, and vice-president of the Hebron 
Bank, has done much to promote the welfare of his community, and add 
to the prestige of the financial institution with which he is connected. 
He was born at Lake Geneva, Wis., January 19, 1868, one of nine 
children born to Matthew A. and Anna (Coffee) Slavin. Matthew A. 
Slavin was born in Ireland, but came to the United States in 1849, and 
for seven years thereafter was engaged in farming in the vicinity of 
Albany, N. Y. He then came West and was at Lake Geneva, Wis., 
until 1887, at which time he moved to Hebron Township, remaining 
here until his death in 1905. 

Frank C. Slavin was brought to Hebron Township by his parents, 
and was here taught farming and completed his schooling. All of his 
mature years he has been interested in farming, and owns 653 acres of 
land in Hebron Township, and 444 acres in another part of the county. 
In addition to carrying on these extensive agricultural operations, Mr. 
Slavin is a member of the grain firm of Slavin, Aylward and Randall, of 
Hebron; of the furniture firm of Slavin, Eastman & Pierce, of Woodstock; 
and for the past fifteen years he has been president and manager of the 
Grove Creamery Company. For some years he has been a member of 
the Elgin Board of Trade. As a Republican he has taken an active 
part in politics, and in 1910 he was appointed to fill out the term of 
Levi Nichols, mayor of Hebron. In the fall of that year he was elected 
to the office and has since been re-elected several times. Under his 
businesslike administration Hebron has greatly prospered and many 
improvements have been inaugurated and carried out. 

Mr. Slavin was married to Miss Nellie Powers, a daughter of Michael 
Powers, of Troy, Wis., and she died in 1910, leaving two children, 
namely: Florence E. and Francis J., both of whom are at home. Mr. 
Slavin was married (second) to Mrs. Helen (Stratton) Watkins, and 
they have one son, Jean M., and one daughter, Helen Elaine. The 
family belong to the Catholic church. It is but seldom that any man is 
successful along so many lines, but Mr. Slavin has never known failure, 
and he is not only prosperous in a marked degree but he is popular as 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 855 

well, and is held in the highest esteem all over the county where he is 
exceptionally well known. 



JAMES H. SLAVIN. 
Page 40. 

JOHN G. SLAVIN. 



John G. Slavin, now deceased, was one of the best farmers Hebron 
Township ever produced, and his widow still lives on the farm which is 
located two miles south of Hebron. He was born March 23, 1851, and 
died September 8, 1892, when but forty-one years of age. On April 23, 
1884, he was married at Hartland, to Mary Halloran, a daughter of 
Patrick and Joannah (McGrath) Halloran, natives of County Clare and 
County Kilkenny, Ireland, and came to Alden in 1853 and 1855 respec- 
tively, and were married in 1S56, living in Alden Township the rest of 
their lives, he passing away at the age of sixty-seven, and she at the age 
of sixty-three, although she survived him. Their old farm is owned by 
their son, Thomas Halloran. They were devout members of St. Patrick's 
Catholic Church of Hartland Township. 

Mary Halloran was born on her parents' farm, and for six years prior 
to her marriage was engaged in teaching, being for four years iii charge 
of one school, and for the other two years at the Hartland school. John 
G. Slavin came to McHenry County in company with his brother Matt 
and a sister, Anna, now Mrs. E. Vanderharr, and they went into partner- 
ship and conducted the farm now owned by Mrs. Slavin. After four 
years Matt Slavin moved on an adjoining farm, and he died in April, 
1S93, when less than forty. 

There are 240 acres in the farm owned by John G. Slavin, and here 
he carried on dairying, which is continued by Mrs. Slavin's sons. They 
have rebuilt and enlarged the house, built a barn and two silos, and have 
every equipment necessary for dairy farming. Some sixty acres of the 
farm have been redeemed by the construction of the drainage district, 
and Mrs. Slavin has kept all of the original acreage. This farm is one 
of the best on the road between Hebron and Woodstock, and it is operated 



856 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

with skill and profit. Mrs. Slavin continues her connection with St. 
Patrick's Catholic church of Hartland Township, some seven miles from 
her home, where the remains of her father lie buried. 

Mr. and Mrs. Slavin were the parents of the following children: 
Matthew; Mary, who is Mrs. Daniel Shields, lives on their farm in 
Hebron Township; Howard, who lives on the home farm; John, who also 
lives on the home farm. Matthew, who owns 200 acres adjoining the 
homestead, is operating it. He married Mary Moren, of Chicago, and 
their children are as follows: James, Marian, Ruth, Matthew and 
Edward. Howard married Agnes Gleason and they have one daughter, 
Helen. Mary has three sons, John, Edward and Daniel. 



JOHN C. SMALL. 



John C. Small, formerly one of the successful general farmers and 
dairymen of Nunda Township, owns his farm of eighty acres of land on 
section 17, and since April, 1920, has been a resident of Crystal Lake. 
He was born in Franklin County, Pa., January 18, 1861, a son of Daniel 
and Catherine (Clingston) Small, natives of Penns3dvania. Daniel 
Small was a farmer of Pennsylvania, who lived to be seventy-seven 
years old, and his wife lived to be seventy-eight years old. 

John C. Small was reared on his father's farm and attended the 
common schools of Pennsylvania. When he was sixteen years old he 
came to Illinois and settled at Sterling, where for twenty years he was 
engaged 'in a stock business, shipping from that point and Dixon, 111. 
In 1913 he came to McHenry County and bought the Charles Daggert 
farm in Algonquin Township, but after a year moved to Crystal Lake, 
and with W. G. Sparawk conducted an auto and implement business for 
two years. In 1916 he bought his farm in Nunda Township, and carried 
on general farming and dairying, and his is a very well improved place. 
This farm is located about three and one-half miles north of Crystal 
Lake. 

John C. Small was married (first) to Pcrdeda Butler, and they had 
two children, namely: Forrest and Glenn. After her death, Mr. Small 
\\:is married (second) to Mrs. Grace (Weygert) Veith, now deceased, a 
widow with one daughter, Margaret. Mr. Veith came to Illinois when 
young and became a prosperous farmer of Lee County. Mr. Small 
married (third) Mrs. Maude Smith, who has one daughter, Verna. 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNT? 857 

DAVID T. SMILEY. 

David T. Smiley, former county judge 1 of McHenry County, is one 
of the most prominent members of the bench of this part of the state of 
Illinois, and has served in several capacities. He was born in Ireland, 
February 10, 1860, one of the ten children of Robert and Mary (Temple- 
ton) Smiley, of whom five survive. Robert Smiley was born in Ireland, 
and came to the United States in April, 1873, locating in McHenry 
County, and there he resided until 1875, when he returned to Ireland 
and died in 1881. His wife survived him until 1895, when she too died. 

David T. Smiley was reared in McHenry County, and after studying 
in the public schools, took a course in the university at Valparaiso, 
Ind., from which he was graduated in 1887. Returning to McHenry 
County, he entered the office of Charles P. Barnes at Woodstock, and 
there completed his legal studies, and was admitted to the bar in 1888, 
following which he entered upon a general practice in that city, forming 
a partnership with his preceptor, which continued for fifteen months. 
Upon its dissolution, he began practicing alone, so continuing until 
his election to the bench as county judge in November, 190G, to which 
office he declined a renomination in 1918, as he preferred to return to 
the practice of the law. While on the bench he also discharged the duties 
of probate judge. 

Judge Smiley was married to Miss Elizabeth C. Hendricks, a daughter 
of John Hendricks. The only son of Judge and Mrs. Smiley, Lionel D., 
was graduated from the University of Illinois at Urbana, 111., and in 
1917, he enlisted in the United States army, for service during the World 
War. Judge Smiley belongs to the Masons, Odd Fellows, and the 
Eastern Star, and has held office in all these fraternities. He and his 
family belong to the Presbyterian church, in which he is an elder. In 
addition to the services rendered as a member of the bench, Judge 
Smiley has distinguished himself as an attorney, and for twenty-two 
years was counsel for the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad, and for 
eighteen years held the same office with the Chicago, Milwaukee and 
St. Paul Railroad. 



ADOLPH B. SMITH, M. D. 

Adolph B. Smith, M. D., formerly of Woodstock, now a resident of 
Rockford, 111., was one of the leading physicians of McHenry County. 



858 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

Ho was born at Oregon, Wis., February 13, 1879, one of two children of 
his parents, Eugene A. and Emma C. (Zook) Smith, the former of 
whom is a prosperous merchant of Brooklyn, Wis. 

After graduating at the Oregon High School, and the University of 
Wisconsin, Dr. Smith matriculated at Rush Medical College, Chicago, 
from which he was graduated in 1908, following which he was an interne 
at the Cook County Hospital. He then established himself in practice 
at Chicago, and remained at that city until 1909, during that period 
being an assistant of Dr. C. W. Barrett. In 1909 he removed to Wood- 
stock, where he built up a large and valuable practice. He was a member 
of the McHenry County Medical Society, and is a member of the Illinois 
State Medical Society, the Tri-State Medical Society, and the American 
Medical Association. For five years he served the city of Woodstock 
as city physician, and was always interested in improving the general 
sanitary conditions of his community. In politics he is a Republican. 

In 1909 Doctor Smith was married to Olive B. Alexander, a daughter 
of John Alexander of Franklin, Ind., and a graduate of the Illinois Train- 
ing School for Nurses. Doctor and Mrs. Smith have two children, 
namely: Marjorie and Richard E. Fraternally Doctor Smith belonged 
to St. Marks Lodge, A. F. and A. M., Woodstock Chapter, R. A. M. and 
to Calvary Commandery, Knights Templar. He and Mrs. Smith are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 



ALFRED C. SMITH. 



Alfred C. Smith, cashier of the First National Bank of Marengo, and 
one of the leading financiers and business men of McHenry County, 
was born at Hampshire, 111., January 20, 1883, one of the twelve children 
born to Vincent and Mary Smith. Vincent Smith was born in Germany, 
but came to the United States when eighteen years old, and here worked 
at the trade of blacksmithing he had learned in his own land. In 1861 
he enlisted in the Union army in defense of his adopted country, and 
served throughout the Civil War, or until he was discharged in 1865. 
His death occurred in 1892. 

Alfred C. Smith attended the common and high schools of his locality 
and then took a pharmaceutical course at the Northwestern University, 
from which he was graduated. For the subsequent six years he was 
engaged in the drug business at DeKalb, 111., and then came to Marengo, 



HISTORY OF McHBNRY COUNTY 859 

where for two and one-half years he continued his drug business, and 
then, in 1911, he became identified with the First National Bank of 
Marengo as teller and bookkeeper, being promoted to be assistant 
cashier and later cashier. This bank is recognized to be the finest bank 
in Illinois outside of Chicago, and some of this prestige is due to the 
efforts of Mr. Smith and the carrying out of his policies. 

In 1907 he was married to Miss Melissa Ditch, a daughter of Jacob 
and Elizabeth Ditch, of Polo, 111. Mrs. Smith is librarian of the 
Marengo Free Library. In politics he is a Republican, and is now 
serving his second term as treasurer of the City of Marengo, and he is 
also on the school board. 



BENJAMIN N. SMITH. 
Page 139. 



FRED NEWTON SMITH. 

Fred Newton Smith, one of the enterprising farmers of Chemung 
Township, was born in the house he now occupies, May 27, 1867, a son 
of Seth P. Smith, and grandson of Shubal and Urania (Monroe) Smith. 
In the fall of 1844 the grandparents came to Illinois, and entered land 
from the government in Chemung Township, McHenry County, now 
owned by his grandson, Fred N. His son, Seth P., took the adjoining 
tract, and both engaged in farming. Shubal Smith died there August 
24, 1858, having been born February 23, 1792, and his wife, born January 
23, 1796, survived him and died February 15, 1871. Their children 
were as follows: Samuel P., who died in New York state in young man- 
hood; Seth P., who was born January 26, 1825, died September 1, 1872; 
James P., who died in Wisconsin; Sanford Zenus, who also died in Wis- 
consin; Chester C; Selby K., who is a resident of Council Bluffs, Iowa; 
and Bradley Monroe, who was the youngest. 

After the death of his father in 1858, Seth P. Smith bought the 
interest of his mother and the other heirs to the homestead, and she and 
her sons moved to Wisconsin, where all died. Shubal Smith was a 
Universalist and he organized a society and services were held at his 



860 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

homo. Chester Smith, one of his sons, was one of the first teachers of 
the home district, but he was also a farmer. Later he and his brother, 
Bradley, went overland to California and later to Pike's Peak, and were 
partners in a grain and lumber business at Avoca, Iowa. Later he and 
his brother Selby became partners in an extensive farming enterprise in 
Iowa. 

On March 18, 1858, Seth P. Smith was married to Caroline Landon, 
born in Oneida County, N. Y., April 17, 1833, a daughter of Richard 
and Sarah (Myers) Landon. In 1857 Mrs. Smith, who was then un- 
married, came to McHenry County to visit her aunt, Mrs. Daniel 
Hutchinson, and it was during this trip that she met and was married to 
Mr. Smith. Her aunt and her husband had located here in 1844 from 
Oneida County, N. Y., and continued to live upon their farm until death 
claimed them, Mr. Hutchinson being at the time of his demise over 
eighty years old. 

Mr. and Mrs. Seth P. Smith began housekeeping in an old log house, 
in which they lived until the present residence was built during the 
summer of 1866, and he also erected a part of the barn now standing, 
his father having built a horse stable of hewed oak timber, which is still 
in use. Seth P. Smith died September 1, 1871. He was a Republican, 
but not an office seeker, although he had served on the school board. 
Although a believer in the efficacy of church work he did not belong to 
any religious organization, nor did he affiliate with fraternities. He and 
his wife had the following children: Sarah, who is Mrs. Edson Cash of 
Chemung Township; Edgar Landon, who is now a resident of Woodstock, 
is a retired farmer and still owns the farm adjoining the homestead; and 
Fred Newton, who is the youngest. 

He was born not long after the present house was completed, and 
the old homestead belongs to him. Until 1894 he and his brother were 
in partnership in their farming operations, but since then have con- 
ducted their own farms. Fred N. Smith rebuilt the barn in 1915, 
making it 42 x 88 feet, and also erected a cement silo. He carries on 
general farming and dairying, and breeds pure-bred Percheron horses, 
having a registered stallion, and his horses command high prices. He 
and his brother also own 160 acres in Seneca Township. 

On October 24, 1906, Fred N. Smith was united in marriage with 
Miss Henriette Person, of Buffalo, N. Y., born February 20, 1876, who 
had come on a visit with her mother to the family of Jacob Barth in 
McHenry County. When she returned to Buffalo Mr. Smith followed 
her home, and they were married at the home of her parents. Mr. and 



EISTORY OP McHENRY COUNTY 8G1 

Mrs. Smith have no children, but two years ago they adopted a boy of 

eleven years, and are rearing him in a good home. In addition to all 
his other holdings, Mr. Smith owns 120 acres of land near Janesville, 
Wis., on which he has a tenant, and he is also keeping up the improve- 
ment on it as he does on his other properties, for he believes there is no 
better investment than farm land, provided it is kept in good shape. 



FRED S. SMITH. 



Fred S. Smith, proprietor of the leading general mercantile store of 
Alden, is one of the substantial men of the county, and one who stands 
high in public esteem. He was born at Harvard, 111., August 15, 1871, 
one of the four children of Ezra and Adeline (Story) Smith. Ezra Smith 
was born in New York state, but came to Harvard, and there carried 
on blacksmithing the remainder of his active life, dying in 1914, his wife 
having died in 1910. 

Fred S. Smith attended the common and high schools of Harvard, 
and his first business venture was as a clerk in a mercantile establish- 
ment, owned by his brother, Edgar S., located on its present site at 
Alden. Edgar S. Smith is a prominent merchant and banker of Harvard, 
and also owns valuable farm land in McHenry County. In 1893, Fred 
S. Smith went into business for himself at Alden, and carries a full and 
varied line of general merchandise, the stock being valued at $50,000. 
Employment is afforded two salespersons in the store, and a very exten- 
sive trade is enjoyed. 

On November 9, 1893, Mr. Smith was united in marriage with Miss 
Eleanor Gates, a daughter of Frank P. and Perlina (Pierce) Gates. Mr. 
and Mrs. Smith have one son, Earl G., who was born April 8, 1903. 
The family belong to the Methodist Episcopal church. A Republican, 
Mr. Smith was appointed postmaster of Alden June 8, 1907. Frater- 
nally he belongs to the Mystic Workers of the World and also to the 
Modern Woodmen of America. He is a very energetic man, experienced 
and alert, and deserves the prosperity which has attended his efforts. 



GEORGE C. SMITH. 



George C. Smith, D. D. S., one of the successful dental surgeons of 
McHenry County, is carrying on a general practice at Richmond, and is 



862 HISTORY OF McIIENRY COUNTY 

recognized as an expert in his profession. He was born in Endeavor, 
Wis., September 5, 1888, one of the three living children born to Clifford 
C. and Ida Elizabeth (Bain) Smith. Clifford C. Smith was born at 
Oxford, Wis., and was a prosperous farmer. He died March 23, 1913. 

Doctor Smith attended the public schools of his native place, the 
academy at Endeavor, Wis., and the dental department of the North- 
western University, from which he was graduated in 1911. Immediately 
thereafter he located at Richmond, where he has carried on a practice 
ever since, and his skill and ability have received gratifying recognition. 

On September 23, 1911, Doctor Smith was married to Miss Gertrude 
Vlassalear, formerly of Seymour, Wis., a daughter of Dr. J. F. Vlassalear, 
a noted Divine Science teacher. Doctor and Mrs. Smith have two 
children, namely: Clifford V., and Gerald F. They attend the Con- 
gregational church. Doctor Smith is a Mason, and he and his wife 
belong to the Eastern Star.. 



JOHN J. SMITH. 



John J. Smith, one of the substantial men of McHenry County, is 
now living retired at Gary Station, after many years of fruitful efforts. 
He was born at Pommersi, Germany, December 27, 1848, a son of John 
and Frederika (Buhrmann) Smith, both born in the same village as their 
son. John J. Smith learned the wagon-making trade, and then went 
into the German army, and was a member of the Empire Guards, 
participating in the Franco-Prussian War. After peace was signed, 
he returned to Berlin, and in the spring of 1872 he came to the United 
States to join an uncle, D. F. Smith, who had located at Crystal Lake, 
111. Mr. Smith worked for C. Pettibone in Nunda Township, and also 
for Lon Walkup until he and Robert Radke, who had married his sister, 
formed a partnership and for three years operated the G. S. Frary farm. 
On June 19, 1878, John J. Smith was married to Barbara Smith, a 
daughter of John George and Barbara (Lang) Smith, also of German 
birth, who had come to this country in 1852, locating soon thereafter 
at Cary Station where Mrs. Smith was born December 16, 1857. Follow- 
ing his marriage Mr. Smith bought his farm of 155 acres, two miles 
north of Cary, for which he paid $60 per acre. The land has been 
developed, but the buildings were poor. Mr. Smith erected new build- 
ings to some extent and remodeled the house. His dairy barn is one of 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 863 

the best in the township. Where necessary, he put in tiling. Dairying 
was his principal feature, and he kept from forty to fifty cows of good 
dairy stock. In 1903 he retired from the farm to Gary Station, and 
about five years ago, he sold his farm for about double what he paid for 
it. In order to buy bis farm, Mr. Smith went into debt $5,000, and 
for years worked untiringly. When he had completed milking; thirty- 
five cows, he used to stack grain until midnight. In the early days 
the prices for produce were low and he sold hogs for as little as .$2.50 
per hundred weight, and other things in proportion. His present 
residence at Gary Station is a pleasantly located one, and he here enjoys 
the comforts his long toil entitles him to. A strong Republican, he 
contents himself with voting the ticket of his party, for he does not 
desire office. Mr. Smith belongs to Nunda Lodge A. F. & A. M.; 
Woodstock Chapter, R. A. M. and to Crystal Lodge, I. O. O. F., in 
which he has passed all the chairs. He has served as representative 
to the Grand Lodge of Odd Fellows many times. Mrs. Smith belongs 
to the Eastern Star, the Rebekahs and the Woman's Relief Corps. 
Mr. and Mrs. Smith have three children: Alvina, Arthur and Laura. 
Alvina Smith married Herman Menlahn and they have the following 
children: Vera, Freddie, Elsie, Etta, Margaret, Doris and Robert. Arthur 
Smith is a fireman on the Illinois Central Railroad and lives at, Free- 
port. He married Edith Smith who died in 1919, leaving three children, 
Viola, Laverne and Leroy. These children now live with their grand- 
parents. Laura Smith married Louis Johnson, a machinist of Chicago. 



JOHN WILDER SMITH. 

John Wilder Smith, whose lumber interests are extensive, and his 
business acumen unsurpassed, is manager of the Hebron Lumber Com- 
pany. He was born in Hebron Township, February 11, 1879, one of 
the three children of Charles F. and Sophronia (Alexander) Smith, 
natives of Hebron Township, and prominent farming people. 

John Wilder Smith was reared on his father's farm, and attended the 
local schools, and the Dixon Business College. Returning to his old 
home, Mr. Smith entered the lumber house of Mead & Chandler, witli 
which he continued for one year, when, in 1903, the business was bought 
by N. A. Chandler. Later Mr. Chandler sold to the Hebron Lumber 
Company, and Mr. Smith was made manager of tin- Hebron branch, the 



864 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

headquarters of the company being at Milwaukee, Wis., where the firm 
operates under the name of the Tibbitts-Cameron Lumber Company. 
The annual business of the Hebron branch aggregates 160,000. In 
connection with the lumber plant, this company operates a large feed 
warehouse at Hebron, and Mr. Smith was placed in charge of it. A 
stanch Republican, Mr. Smith has always been active in politics and 
has served as a member of the school board and township clerk. His 
long experience in the lumber business has given him a knowledge of it 
that is thorough and intimate, and he is recognized as an authority on all 
matters pertaining to it. On December 1, 1919, Mr. Smith became 
cashier of the Bank of Hebron. 



WARREN D. SMITH. 



Warren D. Smith, now living retired at Marengo, was formerly one 
of the enterprising farmers of McHenry County. He was born at 
Warrenville, DuPage County, 111., October 10, 1849, a son of Joel and 
Amy (Bartholomew) Smith, both born in Vermont, where they were 
married, coming thence immediately thereafter, in 1836, to Illinois, by 
way of the Erie Canal and overland in wagons to Naperville, where they 
joined friends. Joel Smith became well-to-do, and was a farmer at 
Warrenville until the fall of 1865, when he came to McHenry County 
to secure more land, although he had already acquired an excellent 
farm in DuPage County. He bought 20o}4 acres, three and one-half 
miles northwest of Marengo, on the River Road, for $31 per acre. Here 
he lived until 1877, and retired to Marengo, leaving it for Elgin, where 
he lived retired until his death, in 1891, when he was seventy-five years 
old. His first wife died soon after the birth of his son, Warren D., and 
he later married (second) Emeline Brown, a teacher of Naperville, who 
died some five or six years ago. By his first marriage Joel Smith had in 
addition to his son, Warren D., a daughter, Clara, who married Edwin 
Bird, a harnessmaker of Woodstock, but both are now deceased. By 
his second marriage, Joel Smith had the following children: Ernest H., 
who died at the age of twenty-eight years, was a graduate of Cornell 
College, and editor of a Republican newspaper in Iowa; and Edith, who 
was a teacher of McHenry County, is now the widow of Dr. Howard L. 
Pratt of Elgin, 111. 



HISTORY OF McHBNRY COUNTY 865 

Warren D. Smith was fifteen or sixteen years old when he came 
with his parents to this county, and he attended its district schools 
and the Marengo High School. He assisted his father as long as he 
remained on the farm, and then rented the property when the former 
retired. Subsequently he bought the farm from his father, acquiring 
possession in 1893. Hon- he lived until 1903, when he retired and 
moved to Marengo, but maintains a partnership with his tenant, and 
keeps up the improvements. He has a barn 32 x 100 feet, fitted for 
dairying, a silo and other modern buildings. The house, which is the 
oldest frame one in Marengo Township, was built about 1840, and the 
sills were hewed from oak, and are 8 x 8 in thickness. It was built to 
withstand any action of wind or weather, and it has done so with the 
exception of the roof, which has been replaced. This old landmark 
was erected by former owner Mr. McLamara. No such work is done 
today as is to be found in this residence, and Mr. Smith has always 
been proud of owning it. His farm contains the same acreage as in 
his father's day. From twelve to thirty cows are kept in the herd for 
dairy purposes, and at one time Mr. Smith owned stock in two creameries. 
He prefers Shorthorn cattle for dairy purposes. As a school trustee 
for District No. 7, he safeguarded the educational interests of his com- 
munity, and like his honored father, he has always voted the Republican 
ticket. 

On September 5, 1877, Mr. Smith was united in marriage to Ellen 
M. Adams, a daughter of John and Lucy (Hardy) Adams. She had 
been reared in McHenry County, but at the time of her marriage she 
was a resident of Evanston, 111., whence her parents had moved, after 
fifteen years' residence at Marengo, where he had carried on a successful 
business as a contractor and builder. Mr. Adams was assistant post- 
master and druggist for Dr. O. S. Janks, and later for W. C. Stewart, 
spending seven years in these positions. Mr. and Mrs. Smith became 
the parents of the following children: Lee A., who is connected with 
the wholesale paper trade of Omaha, Neb.; Gertrude L., who was 
bookkeeper for the J. H. Patterson Lumber Company, died four years 
ago when thirty-three years old; and Ralph L., who is connected with 
the Carpenter Paper Co. of Omaha, Neb. Mrs. Smith is a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Smith has long been a member 
of the Modern Woodmen of America. They are fine people in every 
sense of the word, and their standing in their community has been 
honorably earned and is well merited. 






866 HISTORY OF McIIENRY COUNTY 

CHARLES HAPGOOD SNYDER. 

Charles Hapgood Snyder, one of the retired farmers of Woodstock 
and a highly esteemed resident of McHenry County, was born, June 3, 
1859, on the farm he still owns in Bull Valley, four miles east of Wood- 
stock. He is a son of Jacob and Sarah Sophia (Parks) Snyder, the 
former of whom was born in Northumberland County, Pa., November 
4, 1825, and died December 7, 1908. The latter was brought to McHenry 
County by her parents, Jonathan Hapgood and Sophronia Parks, both 
of whom died in McHenry County, he at the age of fifty-five years, 
and she at the age of eighty-eight years. The last survivor of their 
family, Charles Parks, died at McHenry, in 1918, aged seventy-seven 
years. Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Snyder were married at McHenry January 
1, 1847, and for forty years they lived on the farm now owned by their 
son, Charles H., which Jacob Snyder acquired when as a young man he 
came to McHenry County with his widowed mother. He was a Repub- 
lican and served as road commissioner, and held other offices. A man 
of high character, he was universally esteemed, and he and his excellent 
wife brought up their only son, Charles H. Snyder, to be a credit to them 
and his community. 

Growing up on the homestead in Bull Valley, Charles H. Snyder 
acquired a first-hand knowledge of farming fron his father, and when 
he was twenty-five years old, was married to Rosetta Sherman, a daughter 
of Jeremiah and Mary (Roane) Sherman. The well known "Sherman 
Hill," two miles west of McHenry, was named for them, and the home- 
stead of the Shermans is now owned by a cousin of Mrs. Snyder, Clifford 
Sherman. A sister of Mrs. Snyder, Hattie, widow of Nathan Stephens, 
lives at Ringwood. Mr. and Mrs. Sherman died on the same day in 
March, 1913, and are buried in one grave after spending over fifty years 
together in happy marriage. Until 1915, Charles H. Snyder lived on 
the homestead of his family, but at that time retired, and moved to 
Woodstock, but retains the farm of 240 acres of land. On it he has new 
buildings erected by him, and the property has long been used especially 
for milk production, the equipment being of the best of its kind for this 
purpose. Mr. Snyder now has a tenant on his farm. He is a Repub- 
lican, but has never cared for office, preferring to do his duty to his 
community as a private citizen. Mr. and Mrs. Snyder have two living 
children, the second one, Alta, born May 28, 1889, having died at the 
age of cloven years; Nina, born January 6, 1886, is Mrs. Pearl Haviland, 
married June 30, 1907, has one daughter, Mildred Marion, Mr. Haviland 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 867 

being connected with the Woodstock Typewriter Company; and Leona, 
born December 26, 1902, is at home. During the many years he was 
connected with agricultural matters, Mr. Snyder displayed his know- 
ledge of his work, and his advice is oftentimes now sought by those who 
appreciate the value of his practical knowledge. 



JOHN M. SOUTHWORTH. 
Page 140. 



WALTER J. SPARAWK. 

Walter J. Sparawk, one of the prominent business men of Crystal 
Lake, is extensively engaged in handling automobiles and a general line 
of implements. He was born in McHenry County, in December, 1870, 
a son of Beamon K. and Elizabeth Z. (Hamilton) Sparawk, the former 
of whom was born in Massachusetts, but came to Illinois at an early 
day and became one of the leading farmers of McHenry County, where 
he died in April, 1916. He and his wife had three children. 

Walter J. Sparawk was reared on a farm, and attended the local 
schools. In September, 1896, he entered the business world, establishing 
his present business, with J. C. Small as a junior member. In January, 
1917, he bought out his partner, and has since continued alone. He 
carries a stock valued at $12,000, and gives constant employment to 
two men. 

In politics he is a Republican, and has served for four years as a 
member of the city council of Crystal Lake. His fraternal connections 
are with the Masonic order. A fine business man, he understands the 
requirements of his trade, and as agent for the Empire car, renders an 
appreciated service to his community and the manufacturers of this 
standard make. 



TENNYSON H. SPEAKER. 

Tennyson H. Speaker, proprietor of the Richmond Mills, and senior 
member of the firm of T. H. Speaker & Son, is one of the worthwhile 



868 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

men of McHcnry County, and a man who stands very high in public 
esteem. He was born in Wisconsin, December 16, 1858, one in a family 
of twelve children born to Wion M. and Margaret J. (David) Speaker. 
Wion M. Speaker was born in New York, but came west to Wisconsin 
in young manhood. He served during the Civil War for four years, 
enlisting in the Twenty-eighth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry. His 
death occurred in 1908. 

Tennyson H. Speaker attended the local schools of Wisconsin, and 
learned the milling trade, and has been engaged in this line of endeavor 
all his life. In 1895, he came to McHenry County, and bought his 
present plant which was built in 1844, but later enlarged until it now 
has a daily capacity of 500 bushels. His son, David S., is associated 
with him in business. 

On May 6, 1885, Mr. Speaker was married to Miss Susan Ledger, a 
daughter of Thomas Ledger of Wisconsin. Mr. and Mrs. Speaker 
have seven children, namely: Wion L., Helen L., Edna L., Myra A., 
David S., Frances M., and Susan I. The family belong to the Con- 
gregational church. Mr. Speaker understands every detail of his 
business and so is able to operate it intelligently and profitably, and to 
render a valuable service to his patrons. 



CALVIN SPENCER. 



Calvin Spencer, now deceased, belonged to one of the oldest and 
most important families of McHenry County, and was for many years 
a forceful factor in the life of Chemung Township. He was born in 
Cayuga County, N. Y., October 6, 1807, and he died April 17, 1898, 
when in his ninety-first year. He was a son of Moses and Esther (x\lbee) 
Spencer, who came with him to Illinois, and settled at what is now 
Marengo, November 27, 1835. Mrs. Spencer was ill at that time, and 
she died November 27, 1835. Pioneer conditions prevailed at that 
time, and it was necessary to go beyond Belvidere to Big Thunder Mill, 
some fifteen miles in order to get grain ground into flour. The first 
summer the Spencers cut hay from their claim, which had been entered 
in 1834 by Moses Spencer who had made a trip to McHenry County 
for the purpose of entering his land from the government, going back 
for his family after doing so. 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 869 

Calvin Spencer was a foresight e<l man, and early realized that the 
land entered by his father was more valuable for building lots than 
farming, so divided his share of the estate into them, but continued to 
be a farmer. Until long after he was eighty years old he was active in 
business, and was well preserved until his death. I lis wife, bom in 
1810, died in 1875. Both were very active in the Baptist church and 
Sunday school, and the first services of that denomination were held 
for some time at their home. Mr. Spencer served as president of the 
village board of Marengo for several terms and was on the board for 
many years. First a Whig and later a Republican, he was one of the 
strongest adherents of both parties. He cast his first presidential vote 
in 1S2S, and never missed an election thereafter. In 185S he had the 
privilege of hearing the debate between Lincoln and Douglas, at Chicago, 
and used to refer to that experience as long as he lived. 

Calvin Silencer was married and he and his wife became the parents 
of the following children: Phoebe, who married George Walkup, died 
at the age of seventy-seven years; Sally, who married Henry Paynter, 
died at the age of seventy-five years; LeRoy, who died at the age of 
seventy-three years, lived at the old home with his sister, Edna S., 
never married, was a physician, a strong Republican, and held local 
offices; Edwin, who was a farmer, died at the age of sixty-three, had 
lived in Iowa, Dakota and Texas, and died in the latter state; Mary, 
who is the widow of John Lambden, was born February 25, 1841, and 
lives in the old home; Orson, who lives in Washington County, 111.; and 
Edna Sophronia, who was born in the present house, May 27, 1849, and 
has remained in the home of her parents all her life. Miss Spencer has 
with her in addition to Mrs. Lambden, a niece, Helen Spencer, whom 
she has reared. The Spencer family has always been patriotic, from 
the days of the War of 1812, when Moses Spencer took the place of 
another man and served during that conflict. The Spencer ladies fur- 
nished the clothing for the Marengo company of the Fifteenth Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry during the Civil War, and during the World War, 
they were generous in their contributions to that cause. 



ANSON SPERRY. 
Page 13,7. 



870 HISTORY OF McIIENRY COUNTY 

CHARLES STANFORD. 

Charles Stanford, now deceased, formerly owned the Fair Light 
Farm, located one mile south of Marengo, and was one of the prosperous 
farmers of his township. Mr. Stanford was born at Marengo, November 
15, 1872, and was there reared, and attended the local schools. On 
October 18, 1889, he was married to Edna M. Boies, born at Byron, 
Ogle County, 111., February 15, 1878. When she was nine years old, 
she lost her mother and came to live with her uncle, William A. Boies, a 
sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work. After they were mar- 
ried, Mr. and Mrs. Stanford lived for eight years on the old Stanford 
farm, and he also conducted an ice business, supplying a number of 
patrons. He secured his ice from a fine pond, fed by a spring, which 
was on his farm, but after he had operated this business for some years, 
he sold it. In his farming Mr. Stanford made dairying his main feature, 
and had one of the best herds of Jersey and Guernsey cows in the 
county. At first he shipped his milk to Chicago, but later delivered it 
to Borden's milk plant. The name of Fair Light was given to the farm 
because of the surrounding country. Mr. Stanford died on this farm, 
Januar}' 19, 1907, having been one of the hardest workers in his neighbor- 
hood. Probably this devotion to his work shortened his life, for he died 
when only thirty-five years of age. He was regular in his attendance 
upon the services of the Presbyterian church, of which he was a member, 
and very active in its good work. Mr. and Mrs. Stanford had the follow- 
ing family: Elizabeth, who is teaching school at Elmhurst, 111., having 
been graduated from the Marengo High School in 1918; Charles Edward, 
who was graduated from the Marengo High School; and Mary and Ruth 
Boies, both of whom are at home. Mrs. Stanford is a very capable 
woman, superintending the operation of the farm, with the assistance 
of her son. She belongs to the Presbyterian church, and social clubs 
of the neighborhood, and whatever she undertakes, she carries through 
in characteristic manner. Mr. Stanford was a charter member in the 
Mystic Workers of the World, and she is also a member of this fraternity. 



GEORGE STANFORD. 



George Stanford, now deceased, was one of the most important lay 
members of the Presbyterian Church in McHenry County, having served 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 871 

as Sunday-school teacher and superintendent, trustee and elder, and as 
a representative of the church at presbytery, synod and general assembly. 
He was a strict observer of church discipline and exacted the same 
observance from his family. No levity was permitted in his household, 
especially on Sunday. He was thoroughly posted on religious matters, 
knew the bible as few men do today, and was a fearless advocate of its 
truths as he translated them. 

George Stanford was born at Uckfield, England, January 2, 1833. 
On October 14, 1S55, he was married at London, England, to Sarah 
Elphick, and in 1868 they came to the United States, and after spending 
a couple of years at Chicago, moved to Marengo, after the Chicago fire 
in October, 1871. Mrs. Stanford died April 14, 1902, aged sixty-five 
years. Their children were as follows: Susan Maria, who married Frank 
Rowe of Lee Park, Nebr., is deceased; Frederick, who was a traveling 
salesman, died at Chicago; Fannie, who was her father's housekeeper, 
died unmarried; Arthur Henry, who was a tailor of Warsaw, Ind.; Kate 
Helen, who was in a store for ten years; Jane, who was a teacher for 
ten years at Marengo, and twelve years at Woodstock, became very 
well-known as an educator in primary work, and used to be called upon 
to demonstrate her methods before county institutes, but gave up her 
calling to return and minister to her father; George, who is a farmer 
of Naper, Nebr.; Charles, who is deceased, is written of at length else- 
where in this work; Richard V., who lives at home, is an operator of the 
interurban railroad; and Elizabeth Beatrice, who married F. H. Rehbock 
of Fort Worth, Tex. 

While living at Chicago, George Stanford worked at the tailor trade, 
and when he came to Marengo, it was with the intention of opening 
a tailor shop, but was astonished to find already here his wife's people, 
who had left Chicago on account of the fire, and so he and R. M. Patrick 
joined forces, and Mr. Stanford established a tailoring department in 
Mr. Patrick's store. Some years later Mr. Stanford bought a store of 
his own and conducted it until his health compelled him to dispose of it. 
In the meanwhile he had bought a farm one mile south of Marengo, and 
for some time used to walk back and forth to his work. After his 
retirement, he and Mrs. Stanford returned to England to visit their old 
home, but he found that his residence in America had made it impossible 
for him to endure the restrictions abroad, and he returned glad of his 
citizenship in the New World. He became a Democrat, but never 
sought official recognition. Although reared in the Church of England, 
he connected himself, while at Chicago with Rev. Dr. Goodwin's church 



872 HISTORY OF McIIENRY COUNTY 

and ho thenceforward was firm in the creed of the Presbyterian faith. 
Mi'. Stanford and Rev. John Hutchinson were warm friends and earnest 
in their discussion of the bible, the latter appreciating Mr. Stanford's 
deep knowledge of religious truths, which was more profound than that 
of many clergymen. Mr. Stanford died in 1912, and the funeral services 
were held in the Presbyterian Church. 

As a contemporary writing of him said in part: "He was most cour- 
teous in manner, dignified and commanding in personal appearance. A 
noble type of a perfect gentleman. A man of surpassing strength of 
character and of wide influence in and around our citj\ A wise, gifted, 
noble-hearted man. A father worshipped, a wise counsellor, a leader 
moving toward the right under God's guidance, a wonderful biblical 
student, knowing the bible from Genesis to Revelations and teaching 
the very secret of God's truths was his joy and scope of vision. Such a 
mighty oak has fallen and all his church and city are in mourning for 
they loved him." 



CARL W. STENGER. 



Carl W. Stenger, cashier of the West McHenry State Bank, and vice 
president and director of the Gary State Bank, is one of the leading 
financiers of McHenry County, and a man widely known and universally 
respected. He was born at Stevens Point, Wis., April 16, 1883, one of 
the nine children of George and Margaret (July) Stenger. George 
Stenger was born in New York state, where he learned the trade of a 
butcher. He later moved to Stevens Point, Wis., and still later to 
Green Bay, Wis., where he still resides. 

( ail W. Stenger attended the schools of his native place, and after 
being graduated from its high school, he took a commercial course at 
the Green Bay (Wis.) Business College. When only seventeen years 
old he entered the employ of the Citizens National Bank of Green Bay, 
Wis., as collector, remaining there for five years, during which time he 
rose to be paying teller. Mr. Stenger was then offered his present 
position, which he accepted, and has since made West McHenry his 
place of residence. When the Cary State Bank of Gary, 111., was organ- 
ized, Mr. Stenger was one of its promoters, and he has since continued 
its vice president, and one of its directors. He was state treasurer of 
the Illinois State Council of the Knights of Columbus, representing 
50,000 members for a two-year term from May 10, 1910, to May 10, 



HISTORY OF McHENBY COUNTY 873 

1918. During the Liberty Loan drives, Mr. Stenger was county chair- 
man for the first, second, third, and fourth ones, and was very active 
in putting McHenry County "over the top." His politics are Demo- 
cratic. 

September 6, 1905, Mr. Stenger was married to Miss Sadie M. 
Richards, a daughter of Mrs. Mary Richards of Iron Mountain, Mich- 
igan, and they have the following children: Margaret M., Richard Carl, 
George F., Lucile M., Carl W., Jr., and Grace L. The family all belong 
to the Catholic Church. In addition to being a Knight of Columbus, 
Mr. Stenger belongs to the Modern Woodmen, Catholic Order of Forest- 
ers, and the Mystic Workers of the World. He is rightly numbered 
among the leading men of McHenry County, and is very prominent in 
every respect. 



L. CLATES STEPHENS. 

L. Clates Stephens, superintendent of Division E, of the Public 
Service Company of Northern Illinois, is one of the most capable and 
efficient men in the service of this concern, whose personal popularity 
is even greater than his position, so that he is able to obtain results 
through friendship that might otherwise be difficult to secure. He was 
born at Galesburg, 111., September 1, 1881, one of the two children of 
his parents, Lorenzo and May (Cast) Stephens. Lorenzo Stephens 
was born in Knox County, 111., and he became a successful building 
contractor. His death occurred in 1898. 

L. Clates Stephens attended the common and high schools and was 
graduated from both. Deciding upon a business career, he was con- 
nected with the mercantile line for a time, and then entered the employ 
of his present company as a solicitor in the Oak Park district. So 
capable did he prove himself that he was made superintendent for his 
company at Park Ridge, and in February, 1910, was sent to Crystal 
Lake as superintendent of a district covering seventeen towns and 
one sub-branch office, the latter being at Barrington, 111. He has forty- 
five persons under his supervision. 

On June 6, 1910, Mr. Stephens was married to Miss Josephine 
Fricke, a daughter of Dr. G. H. Fricke of Park Ridge, one of the eminent 
men of his locality. Mr. and Mrs. Stephens have two children, namely: 
Catherine M. and John W. The family belong to the Congregational 
church. 






874 HISTORY OK McTIENRY COUNTY 

BURTON A. STEVENS. 

Burton A. Stevens, of Burton Township, was born on part of his 
present farm in this township, which was named in his honor by his 
father, who served the township for two years as supervisor, and was one 
of the influential men of McHenry County and prominent in the early 
history of this section. The mother of Burton A. Stevens survived her 
husband and died at Lodi, Wis., aged eighty-six years. Their children 
were as follows: Oscar, who died in Iowa when eighty-two years of 
age; Warren, who died in California, was a wealthy wheat grower; Azor, 
who is now living in California; Clara, who died at Lodi, Wis.; Henry, 
who is living in Oregon; Marion, who died in Washington; Lafayette, 
who was a miner and explorer, was married, had a family, and died in 
the state of Washington; and Harriet Cordelia, who is Mrs. Henry 
Walter, lives at Murray, Iowa. 

Burton A. Stevens owns the homestead comprising 412 acres, a 
portion of which is over the line in Lake County, but his buildings lie 
in McHenry County. For fifty years he has lived in his present loca- 
tion, his farm extending in one direction for two and one-quarter miles. 
An oak tree standing in the yard where he was born was about to be 
sold some years ago. He entered protest, offering to pay two or three 
times the offered price, but the owner refused to sell. This old landmark 
was later struck by lightning and is now destroyed. Mr. Stevens' 
buildings are nearly one-half a mile from the public road. The barn, 
32x96 feet, with 26 feet posts, is well suited to the dairying purposes for 
which it is used. The full basement is arranged for stabling. This 
farm is one of the best for all-around general farming in northern Illinois. 

On November 24, 1869, Mr. Stevens was married to Frances Stevens, 
a daughter of Peter Stevens, a sketch of whom is given elsewhere in 
this work. Mr. and Mrs. Burton A. Stevens have three children, 
namely: Clara, who for some years was a teacher in McHenry County; 
Chester, who operates the home farm, located in Burton Township; and 
Cora, who was a teacher in Wisconsin, died at the end of her first term. 
She was a remarkably intelligent girl, and her loss was deeply deplored. 
Chester Stevens married Alice Thompson, born in McHenry County, 
their children being, Lucy and Burton A. For two years Chester has 
been operating the farm, and carries on dairying extensively, turning 
out during 1919, 700 pounds of milk daily from his fine herd of Holstein 
cattle of high grade. In former years his father handled sheep exten- 
sively. Burton A. Stevens is a Republican and a strong temperance 



HISTORY OK McIIENRY COUNTY 875 

man. For seventeen years he assessed Burton Township. lie is one 
of the olilest members of Richmond Lodge, A. F. & A. M., which he 
joined over fifty years ago. For a number of years he has also been 
connected with the local Woodman camp. For three years Mr. Stevens 
was secretary of the Spring Grove Butter factory. He also taught 
school, and for one term taught the school at Spring Grove. Mr. 
Stevens is one of the best-known men in this locality, and his family is 
one which has clone more than its share in the development of the region 
in and about McHenry County. 



FRANK E. STEVENS. 



Frank E. Stevens, proprietor of the Steven Acre Farm of Coral 
Township, resides on his fine property six miles west of Huntley. He 
was born in Allegheny County, N. Y., April 27, 1852, a son of Chauncey 
and Esther A. (Crossman) Stevens, both of whom were born in New 
York, where the father died. His father, grandfather of Frank A. 
Stevens, was a soldier in the American Revolution. In 1850 Chauncey 
Stevens came to Illinois, and remained until after the close of the Civil 
War on a farm in DeKalb County, then going to Bremer County, Iowa, 
and spent about four years on a farm. In 1870 he located in McHenry 
County, buying the farm of 181 acres now owned by his son, Frank E., 
which had been entered from the government by Walter Warner. He 
conducted it for about eight years and then retired, dying in 1882, aged 
seventy years. His widow survived him for some years. Their children 
were as follows: Wells J., who enlisted for service during the Civil War 
in the Illinois Light Artillery, became a sergeant and was honorably 
discharged, following which he went to California, and is now living 
retired in San Benito County, although for years was a ranchman and 
owned 1,000 acres of land; Lucretia, who is Mrs. William Ward, also 
resides in San Benito County, Cal.; Emily, who married Alonzo Peak, 
lives in the vicinity of Coral village; and Frank E. 

Frank E. Stevens was reared on the home place, and in 1878 took 
over the homestead, which he now owns. It now contains 201 acres of 
land, and on it he has erected a fine barn, 34x168 feet, of which the base- 
ment is devoted to stabling, and a wood stave silo. The house has been 
added to and rebuilt several times, and is comfortable and commodious. 
Mr. Stevens carries on dairying, milking thirty cows of the Holstein 



876 HISTORY OF McHENEY COUNTY 

strain. Some years ago he named his property the Steven Acre Farm. 
When he first came into possession of this farm there were a number of 
ponds upon it, but with commendable foresight Mr. Stevens began to 
drain these waste spaces, and now has redeemed land which hitherto 
was worthless, the crops from these fields being exceptionally heavy. 
A Republican, Mr. Stevens has served Coral Township for fifteen years 
as supervisor, and has been on the school board for years. He belongs 
to Union Lodge, A. F. & A. M., and Marengo Chapter, R. A. M. 

On April 4, 1878, Mr. Stevens was married to Rose Barber of Riley 
Township, a sister of Amory Barber, former supervisor of that township, 
who also held that office for fifteen years. Mrs. Stevens was born in 
New York about 1852, and taught school in McHenry County for several 
years prior to her marriage. Mr. and Mrs. Stevens have had the 
following children born to them: Lucia, who is Mrs. Roy J. DcMott 
of Chicago, her husband being a physician of that city, and she was a 
graduate of the State University and a teacher of some note; Ernest, 
who attended the State University, is associated with his father in the 
conduct of the farm, and is unmarried; Grace, who was graduated from 
the State University, taught domestic science in the State Agricultural 
College of Michigan, and later at the University of Illinois, until her 
father compelled her to retire, and she is now at home, having been very 
active in the war work of her neighborhood during the World War; and 
Mary, who is at home. 



WILLIAM P. STEVENS. 

William P. Stevens, postmaster of Richmond, and one of the repre- 
sentatives of the best interests of McHenry County, is a native son of 
Lake County, 111., having been born there May 12, 1847. His father, 
Peter Stevens, was born in Vermont, but came west to Illinois in 1844, 
locating first in Lake County, but in 1856, came to McHenry County, 
where he died in 1881. He married Elizabeth Dar, and she died in 
1868, they having had eleven children. 

William P. Stevens attended the local schools, and was reared on a 
farm. When he was twenty-one years old, he began teaching school, 
and continued in the educational field until 1872. In that year he went 
west to Seattle, Wash., and spent two years, and upon his return to 
McHenry County, resumed his farming operations. An active Demo- 



HISTORY OF McTIENRY COUNTY 877 

rr.it all his life, he was appointed postmaster of Richmond by President 
Wilson, and continues to hold that important office, and under his wise 
administration, its affairs are in excellent condition. 

On April 7, 1881, Mr. Stevens was married to Miss Sarah Richardson, 
a daughter of Robert Richardson, and they have three children, namely: 
Vilctta M., Mildred R., and Lucy E. Mr. Stevens belongs to Richmond 
Lodge No. 143, A. F. & A. M. A man of sterling character, he is held 
in the highest esteem by all who know him. 



THOMAS JOHN STEVENSON. 

Thomas John Stevenson, who resides in Dunham Township, six 
and one-half miles southwest of Harvard, has been associated with much 
of the constructive work of this locality. He was born near Buffalo, 
N. Y., May 1, 1845, a son of Anchrom and Jane (Lattimer) Stevenson, 
both natives of County Armagh, Ireland, where they were married. On 
May 1, 1840, they came to the United States, and spent some time in 
New York state, coming to Illinois in 1845, by way of the Great Lakes 
to Chicago. Hugh Marshall, an old friend in Ireland, had located in 
1844 near Belvidere, 111., and Mr. Stevenson joined him. By his advice, 
Mr. Stevenson secured government land, in the timber, upon which he 
erected a log house, and began to clear off the trees, and soon was able 
to put in enough of a crop to enable him to live. In time, he made of it 
a valuable farm, and he died on it in April, 1897, aged eighty-seven 
years, having spent fifty-two years on this farm. His wife had died 
five years before, aged eighty-two years. There were 240 acres in all 
in his farm, and he was the head of his household as long as he lived. 
He devoted his life to his own business and never wanted to hold 
office. His children were as follows: James, who died at the age of 
seventy-five years, had served during the Civil War in the Ninety-fifth 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry, one-half of his company having been raised 
in Chemung Township; David, who lived for many years at Pittsburgh, 
Pa., where he died, was chief clerk of the Pennsylvania Railroad in that 
city; Thomas John, whose name heads this review; and Hugh, who is an 
attorne}' at Capron, 111., took a legal course at Chicago. 

Thomas John Stevenson has continued to live on the homestead. 
He attended the Stone School, built about 1850, and still in use. He 
assisted his father in clearing off the farm, and broke the land with four 



878 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

or five yoke of oxen, and dug ditches for draining it, in fact more than 
bore his part in putting it in its present high state of cultivation. By- 
drainage, he has reclaimed forty acres of overflowed land, on which he 
has since raised sixty bushels of barley per acre. Devoting considerable 
attention to dairying, he keeps from twenty to twenty-five cows, but he 
also does general farming. His residence, about three-quarters of a mile 
off the road, is reached by a private road he built himself. This house was 
erected in 1854, while the barn was built in 1866, and both are in good 
condition. Both he and his father found in the Republican party their 
political ideals. 

When Mr. Stevenson was thirty-five years of age he was united in 
marriage with Christina Bierlein of Chicago, and they became the 
parents of the following children: Anchrom C; Lancing C; Anna B., 
who lives at Arlington Heights, 111., is a teacher; and Genevieve, who is 
a teacher at St. Charles, 111. Both the daughters attended the DeKalb 
Normal School, and Anna B. taught for a time in the old Stone School 
of her home district, where she and her father before her, had attended. 
Since she was graduated from the normal school, she has been connected 
with the schools of Arlington Heights. The sons attended the Stone 
School, and they are both at home. Both were in the first draft, but 
were so classified that neither saw service. They are unmarried, and in 
partnership with their father in working the farm. Like him they vote 
the Republican ticket. 

The Stevenson family is closely identified with the history of the 
Presbyterian church at Harvard, the elder Anchrom Stevenson being 
one of its founders, and all of the family belong to it. The three genera- 
tions of Stevenson belong to the Masonic lodge at Harvard. It would 
be difficult to find a finer or more representative family than this one 
in McHenry or other counties of this part of the state, and the name 
has long stood for integrity and uprightness of no mean order. 



EDWARD M. STEWART. 

Edward M. Stewart, sole proprietor of the Nippersink Garage, and 
sole agent for the Ford cars at Richmond, also handles farm machinery, 
and is one of the leading business men of his section of McHenry County. 
He was born in Hebron Township, October 9, 1870, a son of John 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 879 

Stewart, a native of New York, who came to McHenry County at an 
early day, and became a prosperous farmer. 

Edward M. Stewart attended the local schools and moving to 
Richmond Township engaged in farming, being thus engaged for over 
a quarter of a century. He then moved to Richmond, and started 
his present business, and later took Mr. Richardson in as partner. 
Later he bought Mr. Richardson's interest, and has since continued 
alone. He owns his commodious garage, 48 x 162 feet, built of hollow 
tile, and carries a stock of $20,000. He holds the agency of the Ford 
cars for Richmond and Burton townships, and does a very large business 
in them and farm machinery, as well as in the repairing of automobiles 
and the handling of automobile accessories. 

In 1895 Mr. Stewart was married to Miss Cora Cotting, a grand- 
daughter of Richmond's pioneer settler, C. G. Cotting. Mr. and Mrs. 
Stewart have one son, Charles C, who is attending school. Mr. Stewart 
is a Mason. In politics he is a Republican. Both he and his wife 
belong to the Congregational church. A man of high principles and 
excellent business sense, he has been able to make a considerable material 
advance, and win and hold the confidence and respect of his associates. 



JOHN J. STEWART. 



John J. Stewart, now living retired at Hebron, belongs to one of 
the most important families of McHenry County, is himself a dis- 
tinguished figure in the life of this section, having been associated with 
extensive agricultural interests, and industries, and was instrumental, 
with others, in organizing the drainage district of this region which 
has done so much to reclaim land that would otherwise be still lying 
useless, instead of yielding up magnificent crops. He is a son of Robert 
W. and Susan Ann (Ross) Stewart, the former dying in March, 1876, 
and the latter in 1896. They had the following children: Eunice Jane, 
who married Prentis Bowman, died in young womanhood; Mary, who 
married Thomas Charles, also died in young womanhood; Harry E. 
Stewart, is a farmer of Elmore, Minn., who has just refused $300 per 
acre for his land; and John J., whose name heads this review, who lived 
to maturity; Nellie, who died at the age of sixteen; and Charles and 
James, who died in infancy. 

John J. Stewart owns 320 acres of land, a portion of the 900-acre 



880 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

tract of his father, which is divided into two farms, now operated by his 
sons. He was engaged in conducting these farms until 1913 when he 
retired to Hebron, where he has a very pleasant home. After the 
death of his father Mr. Stewart succeeded to the former's interest in 
the Stewart cheese factory, he and William H. Stewart had organized, 
and he conducted it for several years. There are now about 100 cows 
on the two farms, of which about fifty are kept for dairy purposes. 
While he has served on the village and school boards he is not very active 
in politics, his father having taken much more interest in these affairs 
than he. Mr. Stewart helped to organize the drainage district and 
was one of the first commissioners, his associates being Charles Haw- 
thorne and Theodore Hamer. The ditch was built at a cost of $50,000, 
thus giving property owners an outlet which enables them to successfully 
tile their land and cultivate thousands of acres that formerly were 
covered with swamps. This project at first met with opposition from 
the reactionaries on account of the initial cost, requiring some effort 
on the part of the men broad-minded enough to see what the results 
would be, but they overcame this and their work stands as a monument 
to their public spirit and sound, common sense. 

On September 22, 1880, Mr. Stewart was married to Frances E. 
Nichols, and they became the parents of the following children : Mary N., 
who married George Mathison, a farmer of Walworth County, Wis., 
has four children, Elizabeth Jean, Alice, George Stewart, and Dorothy 
May; Robert W., who married Beth Fellows, has the following chil- 
dren: Robert John, Fred Fellows, Frances May, Elsie and Charlotte 
Fellows; and Donald H., who married Dot Fellows, sister of Robert's 
wife, and their children are: May Elizabeth, who is known as Bettie, 
Ruth, Edith Georgia and John James. Mr. and Mrs. Stewart are both 
members of the Presbyterian church. 



ROY J. STEWART. 



Roy J. Stewart, sheriff of McHenry County, and one of the men who 
deserves more than passing mention on account of the valuable service 
he has rendered his community in aiding in the preservation of order, 
and the detection of criminal practices, is a native of the county, having 
been born within its confines, January 18, 1881. He is a son of Judson 
and Mary (Mayo) Stewart, who had nine children, of whom six survive. 



HISTORY OF McIIEXRY COUNTY 88] 

Judson Stewart was a farmer of MeHenry County, but now resides in 
San Diego, Cal., and was one of its substantial men. 

Roy J. Stewart was reared and educated in this county, and after 
completing a common and high school course, he learned the trade of a 
barber, which he followed for three years. He then became identified 
with the Oliver Typewriter Company, and remained with that concern 
until his appointment as chief deputy sheriff. So competent did he 
prove that he was the logical candidate of the Republican party for 
sheriff in 1918, and was elected to that office on November 4, and is 
still serving. 

Mr. Stewart was married to Miss Beulah E. Halderman, a daughter 
of Marshall Halderman. Mr. and Mrs. Stewart have one son, LeRoy 
William. The family belong to the Congregational church. Mr. 
Stewart is a member of the Odd Fellows, and of the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks and the Loyal Order of Moose. An efficient 
public official and upright man, MeHenry County is proud of him and 
the record he is making for himself and his section of the state. 



WILLIAM STILL. 



William Still, one of the prosperous farmers of Dorr Township, 
resides one mile south of Woodstock, and is a man widely and favorably 
known. He was born in Lincolnshire, England, December 20, 1851, 
a son of William and Hannah (Briggs) Still. In June, 1852, he was 
brought to the United States by his parents who joined friends at Ring- 
wood, this county, where the father obtained employment at $13 a 
month. Later he bought an undeveloped farm in MeHenry Township, 
and spent about fourteen years upon it. In 1869, he bought the Barber 
farm east of Woodstock, where he died in 1900. The mother died 
January 6, 1900. 

William Still had scarcely any schooling, but grew up on the home- 
stead where he remained until 1875, at which time he rented a farm 
across the road from his old home, and remained on it for two years. 
He then went on another farm and continued as a renter for seven years, 
and has owned in all four farms, buying his present place of 120 acres, 
in 1908. 

On November 25, 1875, William Still was married to Mary Susan 
Frame, who died four years later. On January 26, 1890, he was mar- 



ssl> HISTORY OF McIIENRY COUNTY 

ried second to Cynthia Frame, a younger sister of his first wife, and a 
daughter of John and Rachael (Knight) Frame, natives of Virginia, 
who settled in Dorr Township, where Cynthia Frame was born February 
26, 1856. By his first marriage Mr. Still had one daughter: Zella, who 
is Mrs. Arthur Ellis of Salem, Wis. By his second marriage Mr. Still 
has the following children : Francis Roy, who married Lillian Coffman, 
has one son, Kenneth William, and is associated with his father in farm- 
ing; and belongs to the local school board; Lura Mae, who is at home. 

William Still is a Republican, and has served as a tax collector, and 
for thirty years has been a member of the school board. He is a director 
of the Dunham-Chemung Farm Mutual Fire Insurance Company, 
and has been instrumental in building up the volume of business of this 
company now averaging .$3,000,000. The Methodist Episcopal church 
has in him a faithful and influential member, and he is serving it as 
trustee. 

Mr. Still is a man who has always taken the stand that it pays to 
develop land, and use improved and modern methods in operating it. 
Whenever necessary he has put in tile and otherwise drained his farm, 
put up the buildings he has needed, and bought and installed machinery 
and appliances. His premises show that the one in charge not only 
understands his work, but also takes a pride in keeping everything up 
to standard. He stands well in his neighborhood, and many times his 
experiments have resulted in an improvement in neighborhood farming. 
Such men as he always do constructive work, and aid materially in 
advancing the standards of their community. He can be counted upon 
to give active support to all measures looking toward increasing the 
welfare of Dorr Township and McHenry County. 



GEORGE A. STILLING. 

George A. Stilling, owner of the garage which bears his name, is one 
of the substantial business men of McHenry. He was born in McHenry 
County, May 20, 1892, one of the six children of Benjamin and Margaret 
(Miller) Stilling. Benjamin Stilling is engaged in handling real estate 
at McHenry, and is one of the leading men of his community. 

George A. Stilling was reared in his native county, and after attending 
the common and high schools, took a course at Notre Dame University, 
from which he was graduated in 1912. Immediately thereafter, he 



HISTORY OF McHENKV COCNTY 883 

opened his garage, and is sole agent in his locality, for the Studebaker 
automobile, having been appointed as such in 1916. He has three men 
in his employ, and renders a most efficient service. His garage was 
erected at a cost of $7,000, and is thoroughly equipped for the purposes for 
which it was intended. He carries a stock valued at $5,000, and is 
rightly numbered among the most alert of the city's young business men. 
In 1916 he was married to Miss Grace L. Moehnann of Chicago, a 
daughter of Dr. E. 0. Moelmann of Chicago. Mr. and Mrs. Stilling 
belong to St. Patrick's Catholic church. In politics he is a Republican. 



SIMON STOFFEL. 



Simon Stoffel, district and special agent of the Fidelity-Phenix 
Insurance Company, and representative of eleven other very strong 
companies, is one of the leading business men of West McHenry, as well 
as vice president of the McHenry State Bank. He was born in Lake 
County, 111., January 13, 1856, one of the ten children of John and 
Elizabeth (Weingart) Stoffel. John Stoffel was born in Germany, but 
came to the United States at an early day, locating in Lake County, 
111., where he was engaged very profitably in farming until his death, 
which occurred in 1890. His widow survived him for many years, 
dying March 29, 1913. 

Simon Stoffel attended the common schools of his native county, 
and remained on his father's farm until he was twenty years old, when 
he embarked in a general merchandise business, continuing in it until 
1902, when he established himself in his present line, and has built up 
a valuable connection. In addition to handling insurance, Mr. Stoffel 
deals in real estate and is a leader in both lines in McHenry County. 
He was one of the chief organizers of the West McHenry State Bank, 
of which he has continued vice president, his connection with this 
institution giving it added prestige. A staunch Republican, he was 
supervisor of his township, a member of the school board, and has 
been mayor of McHenry, giving to all these offices the same efficienl 
supervision that his business receives. Mr. Stoffel and his family belong 
to St. Mary's Roman Catholic church, and he belongs to the Knights 
of Columbus connected with that parish. 

On December 18, 1883, Mr. Stoffel was united in marriage with 
Miss Anna G. Bonslett, a daughter of Leonard Bonslett, and they have 



88-4 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

the following children: Dorothy E., who is Mrs. C. C. Westfall of 
Chicago, 111.; Helena M., who is employed by the Illinois Telephone 
Company at Chicago; Clara V., who is bookkeeper for her father: 
Julia L., who is the wife of C. J. Reihansperger, a hardware merchant 
of West McHenry; and M. Esther, who is associated with the Fidelity- 
Phenix Insurance Company in Chicago. Few men stand any higher in 
public esteem than Mr. Stoffel, and his prosperity is deserved, for it is 
self-acquired. 



HENRY GILBERT STREET. 

Henry Gilbert Street is a horticulturist living on the old farm of his 
family in Hebron Township, one and one-half miles east of Hebron. 
He was born on this farm May 10, 1865, a son of Selden G. and Mary D. 
(Sanford) Street, and she was born in Orleans County, N. Y., in 1828. 
They were married in New York state. Selden G. Street was a son 
of Chapin Street, who was born in 1797, and in 1855 came to McHenry 
County and bought a farm in Hebron Township for his son, Selden, 
who located on it about 1855, and resided upon it until he died. Chapin 
Street also came to Hebron Township and passed the remainder of his 
life on the farm. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Dolly Brown, 
died in 1880. 

Selden G. Street and his wife had the following family: Sarah 
Adelaide, who is Mrs. Porter C. Bliss, lives at Albion, N. Y. ; Carrie L.. 
who married Russell Holmes, a farmer of Hebron Township; Ella T., 
who married Edward P. Greeley of Richmond Township, a sketch of 
whom appears elsewhere in this work; and Henry G., whose name 
heads this review. 

Henry G. Street has a portion of the original farm, and all of his build- 
ings have been erected since 1900, his house being one of the most 
modern in the township, and supplied with electric lights and other 
conveniences. After buying out the